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Old 01-18-2024, 08:47 PM
 
Location: In the north country fair
4,928 posts, read 10,593,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by howard555 View Post
I don't.
-------------------------
It's beyond my comprehension. If I was given 250 words in Spanish and asked to learn their meaning in English and how to pronounce them. I could not remember all of that.
You’re making a lot of assumptions here. How do you know? Have you already tried? Most people who learn a language are able to do so because what they are learning is meaningful to them. I agree that you probably wouldn’t be able to memorize 250 random words in Spanish but that is not (generally speaking) how languages are taught.

Quote:
Take this simple sentence: Hi Jose do you have a computer? Hi Jose is good but the rest requires learning and memorizing 5 other words. For a hour long sermon likely looking at an unlimited vocabulary unless the speaker is not fluent in the language and the people hearing it know it's broken Spanish but they are afraid to tell the person.
Again, you’re making a lot of assumptions. For example, do you have a computer? is actually only three words in Spanish.

My advice is to just start studying the language. You seem to be defeating yourself before you even start or try by telling yourself how impossible it will be. Is it difficult? Yes. Does it require a lot of work? Yes. Impossible? No.
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Old 01-19-2024, 01:24 AM
 
Location: Washington state
6,972 posts, read 4,807,330 times
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OP, I've had 6 years of German, a year each of Spanish and French, all in high school, and I've tried to learn some Russian on my own.

When you start out in any language, you'll learn the basics first and then build on them. You learn the verbs and how to conjugate them. And you learn the grammar as you go along. You don't learn all of it at once in one long unending lesson.

You'd be surprised at how many words are related to each other and how easy it is to go step by step. And actually, "do you have a computer?" is only two words, if you like. "Tienes computadora?" You'd learn to conjugate the word "tener" meaning "to have" in Spanish. It's a very common verb so you'd use it a lot. It doesn't take much guessing to understand what "computadora" is, so there you go. Your first couple of words in Spanish and it took hardly any work at all, did it?

Tomorrow you can tell someone in Spanish "Tengas un buen dia!" Have a nice day!
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Old 01-19-2024, 10:14 AM
 
12,579 posts, read 8,809,297 times
Reputation: 34395
Quote:
Originally Posted by howard555 View Post
A local pastor gives sermons in Spanish. How does one go about learning the 1000's and 1000's of words to be able to do that. There's spelling, meaning, definitions, how to pronounce, etc. Not to mention the memory needed to recall all the words and their meaning when compared to the English word for the same.

Thanks.
If that's your only reason for learning Spanish, find a different church that does services in English.
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Old 01-19-2024, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
17,106 posts, read 56,712,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by howard555 View Post
I don't.
-------------------------
It's beyond my comprehension. If I was given 250 words in Spanish and asked to learn their meaning in English and how to pronounce them. I could not remember all of that.

And then try to speak a sentence or two most of the words in a sentence might not be in those 250 words.
That might require a few thousand much less a few hundred.

Take this simple sentence: Hi Jose do you have a computer? Hi Jose is good but the rest requires learning and memorizing 5 other words. For a hour long sermon likely looking at an unlimited vocabulary unless the speaker is not fluent in the language and the people hearing it know it's broken Spanish but they are afraid to tell the person.

I think you are going about it wrong. My first suggestion is to get a copy of "Spanish in 10 Minutes a Day" and work through that. It starts with the "who, where, what, when" words and takes a "rough and ready" approach to get you talking and listening with partial effect rather than memorizing vocabulaty.

It should not be difficult to find a native Spanish speaker who will tutor you in Spanish if you tutor them in English.

Spanish is a relatively easy language to learn from English.
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Old 01-21-2024, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Argentina
123 posts, read 19,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post

Spanish is a relatively easy language to learn from English.
Yo podría decir lo mismo desde mi perspectiva. El inglés es una lengua relativamente fácil de aprender para los nativos de habla hispana.


If you are capable to understand the words above, then you're able to learn Spanish.
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Old 01-21-2024, 01:12 PM
 
14,359 posts, read 20,424,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
Yo podría decir lo mismo desde mi perspectiva. El inglés es una lengua relativamente fácil de aprender para los nativos de habla hispana.
If you are capable to understand the words above, then you're able to learn Spanish.
I took Spanish in high school and my final grade was D- or one notch above F+
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Old 01-21-2024, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
17,106 posts, read 56,712,890 times
Reputation: 18365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
Yo podría decir lo mismo desde mi perspectiva. El inglés es una lengua relativamente fácil de aprender para los nativos de habla hispana.


If you are capable to understand the words above, then you're able to learn Spanish.
I agree, the languages are pretty easy for native speakers of one to learn the other. And of course as you start to learn, you can understand what someone is saying but you can't readily reply.
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Old 01-21-2024, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
2,141 posts, read 1,413,542 times
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Generally much easier for younger people to become fluent in another language.
Australia is actually regarded as a language graveyard as most languages are lost in a generation or two. Our non English speaking immigrants come from a constantly changing range of countries so there is no major second language even though something like 245 languages are spoken here.
Our Italian cousins have much better English than our Italian. The kids started English in kindergarten and had daily lessons. One is now attending an English immersion high school. Here we cannot produce enough language teachers for even high schools to offer extensive language courses and there are very few immersion schools.
You need a lot of practice, and a need to speak the language. Japan and China both include English in the school curriculum but the standard of English there is nothing like that which is found in much of Europe. I think they usually simply do not have the opportunity to practice.
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Old 01-21-2024, 05:27 PM
 
Location: The Triad
34,091 posts, read 82,438,418 times
Reputation: 43642
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
Yo podría decir lo mismo desde mi perspectiva.
El inglés es una lengua relativamente fácil de aprender para los nativos de habla hispana.
If you are capable to understand the words above, then you're able to learn Spanish.
Am I correct that the 'manner' of Spanish is rather different IN Spain vs the former colony countries?
If so... does that style have a name? Catalan? Galician?
Thanks
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Old 01-21-2024, 05:30 PM
 
14,185 posts, read 11,431,159 times
Reputation: 38736
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Am I correct that the 'manner' of Spanish is rather different IN Spain vs the former colony countries?
If so... does that style have a name? Catalan? Galician?
Thanks
Castilian (castellano) is what the Spanish spoken in Spain is called.

Catalan and Galician are separate languages closely related to Spanish.
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