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Old 01-26-2024, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Argentina
268 posts, read 56,291 times
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Ahhh... That makes sense. But only for the Northern Hemisphere. Are you an American? Because Pitt doesn't seem to have heard it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
not at all common!
Are you hearing that in Argentina? because it is not heard here in the US.
Pitt... in Argentina, only Spanish is heard.
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Old 01-26-2024, 04:49 PM
 
14,299 posts, read 11,673,706 times
Reputation: 39059
Yes, "it went sour" and "it went south" is not a confusion of "south" and "sour." It's just that these two phrases happen to mean roughly the same thing. "South" is perceived as being "down," the way it is shown on a standard map or globe.

I'm a very good speller, but I have become more tolerant of others' spelling mistakes over time. English is, frankly, horrible to spell, and some people no matter how hard they try are still going to make errors or be unsure if what they have written is correct or not.

It's actually a little easier for non-native English speakers because they tend to encounter the written language first, or at the same time as the spoken language. "Their," "there" and "they're" all look different, so if you first learn these words in written form in a classroom, they are clearly different and have different meanings.

But native speakers learn these words as nonliterate toddlers and they do all sound the same. Then we have to learn at age 5 or 6 to map three different spellings to this same sound and differentiate their meanings. It's not THAT hard, but some people are careless and others are just genuinely poor spellers.
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Old 01-26-2024, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Arizona
2,557 posts, read 2,215,576 times
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It's fairly common to see "gun site" instead of "gun sight".
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Old 01-26-2024, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Rural Wisconsin
19,796 posts, read 9,331,249 times
Reputation: 38302
"Insure" vs. "assure" are two other words often used incorrectly.

Ditto for "apprise" and "appraise".

And, in writing, "marshall law" instead of 'martial law'.

I am quite sure there are many other words are are often incorrectly exchanged for each other.
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Old 01-26-2024, 05:25 PM
 
14,299 posts, read 11,673,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
"Insure" vs. "assure" are two other words often used incorrectly.
You can add "ensure" to those.
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Old 01-26-2024, 06:03 PM
 
323 posts, read 135,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
In my opinion, both words have very different meanings.
Sour: bitter
South: is just a cardinal point (south; north, east, west).
I understand that "sour" can also be used figuratively: John thought that Sean had betrayed him and their relationship went sour

But saying "south" instead of "sour" sounds like a mistake to me.
Obviously, I'm not a native English speaker. So you can instruct me on that.
Confusing sour and south doesn't happen. Mistaking -r for -th and vice versa isn't a thing. Or, if it is, it's a vanishingly rare one.
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Old 01-26-2024, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
12,957 posts, read 9,467,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Affect-> Act on.

Effect -> the End result.
Effect can also be used as a verb. For instance, "His actions could affect changes to the outcome". When used as a verb, it means "to cause/influence something to happen".

However, as you say, 'effect' and 'affect' are often misused, perhaps by someone thinking they are interchangeable.
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Old 01-26-2024, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
12,957 posts, read 9,467,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Haven't heard of south/sour either. A couple of the others seem like typos or autocorrect issues. Autocorrect causes a lot of issues, some of them hilarious. Affect/effect however I've actually seen people at work get into arguments over.

I don't understand how people keep making the "would of" for "would've." It's such a common error that even when I was a kid, the English textbooks pointed it out specifically.

The one that I see a lot today is leaving out the verb "to be." As in "the clothes needs washed" instead of "the clothes need to be washed."

Because they never paid attention in English class.

Pronouncing "would've" sounds like "would-uv", which the misuser interprets as "of". But that's still no excuse.

I once saw someone type "pre-madonna" for "prima donna".
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Old 01-26-2024, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
12,957 posts, read 9,467,634 times
Reputation: 8943
Another one is using "advise" for "advice", e.g., "I need some advise ...."
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Old 01-26-2024, 06:27 PM
 
2,040 posts, read 986,706 times
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Modern English is sorely overdue for a makeover and simplification. China and Germany have revised their language standards, I think we should be next.

It has to be so frustrating to learn English as a non-native speaker, not to mention trying to teach ESL students. So many inconsistencies and odd pronunciations.

I've always struggled with lie/lay/laid.
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