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Old 01-26-2024, 07:34 PM
 
Location: USA
8,848 posts, read 5,882,543 times
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I was taught this handy sentence to remember the difference between "hung" and "hanged":

"The judge hung up his robes when he realized that he would be responsible for people being hanged."
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Old 01-26-2024, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Argentina
124 posts, read 20,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketDawg View Post
Another one is using "advise" for "advice", e.g., "I need some advise ...."
Yes, but that would be very difficult for me to detect, since several words change "S/C" according to whether it is American or British English.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
It's actually a little easier for non-native English speakers because they tend to encounter the written language first, or at the same time as the spoken language.
You don't think that non-natives are so arrogant to criticize native English-speakers and not self-incriminate.
It happens that being English the language that is spoken in the whole world, it becomes more remarkable. But that doesn’t implicate non-natives are free from sin. Something like "whoever is free from sins who throws the first stone".
We could make a similar thread with the mistakes of us, Hispanics, and I'm sure we would surpass those of English speakers.
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Old 01-26-2024, 07:53 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
15,941 posts, read 20,906,769 times
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'Weary, sometimes misspelled as 'weery.' It's often misused used as as some frankenstein concoction of 'leery' and 'wary' somehow run together into 'weary'.
Weary means tired, leery and wary mean cautious or suspicious.
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Old 01-26-2024, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
6,308 posts, read 4,767,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
I read a lot what people write in forums and stuff like that and I often come across mistakes made by natives. I’m not referring to grammar mistakes or using the wrong verb, which would be more understandable but rather wrong spelling.
Some of your examples are homophones (words that sound alike but have different meanings) which can confuse even the well-educated.

I'm a college graduate, an avid Scrabble player and a devout cruciverbalist.

I am proud of my command of the English language, yet I also have problems with "affect" and "effect."

Other examples for me are "inure" vs "enure," "principle" vs "principal."

I still have to look them up when I use them.
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Old 01-26-2024, 09:45 PM
 
19,485 posts, read 17,709,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
It's fairly common to see "gun site" instead of "gun sight".
Oh yea. The sight, site and cite thing is real.
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Old 01-26-2024, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Rural Wisconsin
19,438 posts, read 8,990,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
You can add "ensure" to those.
Absolutely.
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Old 01-26-2024, 10:50 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
216 posts, read 147,597 times
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Maybe not a spelling issue, but maybe it is: Just look on C-D every day and see so many (supposedly) native English-speakers who for some stupid reason think an apostrophe before "s" is needed to make a word plural. I am not talking about those rare cases where it's required, but rather with any random noun, e.g., "Many American's like to..." (Never mind the abomination with verbs like "get's" and "say's" that I have seen on C-D also.) Why do so many people do this? STOP IT!
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Old 01-27-2024, 01:52 AM
 
37,422 posts, read 45,609,203 times
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"I seen....."

OMG. Why do people say this? It makes me cringe every time I hear it. I really have to put my hand over my mouth to stop myself from correcting them.
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Old 01-27-2024, 03:58 AM
 
1,603 posts, read 681,085 times
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principal/principal
capital/capitol

And when/why did people start substituting “on accident” for “by accident”?

Also

desert, region of very dry land
desert, to abandon
dessert, the sweet course eaten at the end of a meal, I.e., cake, pudding, ice cream, etc.
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Old 01-27-2024, 04:35 AM
 
1,504 posts, read 1,006,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post

The one that I see a lot today is leaving out the verb "to be." As in "the clothes needs washed" instead of "the clothes need to be washed."
This is very common in Pennsylvania.
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