Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-09-2024, 07:16 PM
 
7,272 posts, read 3,485,885 times
Reputation: 13833

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonMike7 View Post
Agreed. I'm not waiting for the schools to teach my kids these things. I'm teaching them myself.
If you live in California, you may need to add mathematics to the list of things you need to teach your kids.
California’s Weapons of Math Destruction
The state’s new teaching framework tries to ‘combat inequities’ and pushes ‘social justice work.’

https://www.wsj.com/articles/califor...hare_permalink

Quote:
The framework is voluntary, but it will heavily influence school districts and teachers around the Golden State. Developed over the past four years, it runs nearly 1,000 pages. Among the titles of its 14 chapters are “Teaching for Equity and Engagement,” “Structuring School Experiences for Equity and Engagement” and “Supporting Educators in Offering Equitable and Engaging Mathematics Instruction.”The guidelines demand that math teachers be “committed to social justice work” to “equip students with a toolkit and mindset to identify and combat inequities with mathematics”—not with the ability to do math...

To achieve equal outcomes, the framework favors the elimination of “tracking,” by which it means the practice of identifying students with the potential to do well. This supposedly damages the mental health of low-achieving students. The problem is that some students simply are better at math than others. To close the gap, the authors of the new framework have decided essentially to eliminate calculus—and to hold talented students back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-09-2024, 08:18 PM
 
Location: WA
5,286 posts, read 7,577,932 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
I think that, maybe, in some school systems that have a form of "silent tracking" that the students' schedules are so crowded that if they get off track the academic graduation requirements can't be met.
Not in any school or school district I have ever been associated with in any way.

One of the main jobs of counselors is to make sure that every student that is assigned to them based on last name or graduation year is on track to graduate. The VERY LAST thing any school administrator or counselor EVER wants to do is sit down in a meeting with parents of a student the spring semester of their senior year and explain: "Sorry, we Fu***d up. Your son is not on track to graduate with his class and so you can cancel those graduation tickets for grandma. Your child is going to have to do summer school and then we will mail his diploma in the fall.

If there is one thing at all that counselors are meticulous about it is making sure that such a conversation never happens. Kids who flunk a bunch of classes and then don't have enough credits? Sure, that conversation happens all the time. But telling parents that their child isn't going to graduate because they accidentally took wood shop instead of algebra back in 10th grade? Nope. That conversation doesn't happen. At least not if the counselor is remotely competent and does the job they were hired to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2024, 08:28 PM
 
Location: WA
5,286 posts, read 7,577,932 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
Boys today would never take gym class without a shirt on. There is no such thing as "shirts and skins" today. I have no idea why.

Today there would also be a substantial number of boys sitting out this gym class with a doctor's or parent's excuse that they had some kind of medical condition that didn't allow them to participate in the class. Also, on the pushups, half the boys today would be flat on their bellies after the second pushup. I know because I have taught PE many times and it is a joke to try to get boys to do pushups.
Maybe not the average kid. But athletes? HS athletes perform at a far higher level than their counterparts in the 60s. You can see this by things like school records in running, swimming, etc. And the top HS football and basketball teams from today would absolutely CRUSH their 1960s counterparts. They would make them look silly.

Student athletes today are on a whole different level. When I taught in Texas, football was a year-round sport. Athletes would be enrolled in football as their 7th period PE class and so would get coaching and weight training year-round in a manner that neatly steps around the prohibition on after school practice before August 10 or whatever the regulations say. And it was always 7th period so that they would stay after school and keep working out. Year-round. Then they would join 7 on 7 leagues and play all summer and go to special position camps in the summer hosted by all the top NCAA D1 programs.

Soccer and baseball is equally crazy with all the elite travel teams that play year-round.

There was none of that when I played HS football back in the late 70s and early 80.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2024, 09:00 PM
 
Location: A coal patch in Pennsyltucky
10,244 posts, read 10,491,670 times
Reputation: 12542
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
Something I always wondered too. My high school heavily pushed art and music classes, saying that colleges liked to see them, even if you didn't get an A. But home ec and shop, which have practical applications, were heavily discouraged if we wanted to go to college.
I've never seen schools heavily push art and music. The people who want to take these classes usually have talent in these areas. My three children dropped band in junior high despite my wife encouraging them to continue. One of the three took art as an elective in high school because she is talented in art.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
In elementary school, we did square dancing in class. One day, my assigned partner was a popular girl who hated me. She spent the hole class complaining about how much she hated me and didn't want to dance with me. One of the songs referred to your partner as your "Red River pal". I then told her "I guess you are my Red River pal", and she started cursing at me. I wonder if nowadays I'd be in trouble for sexual harassment for calling her my "Red River pal".
My high school would do square dancing in PR class for a couple months before Christmas break. On the last day before break, everyone could go to the gym and square dance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
But all those got included with the Math curriculum under Common Core.

Financial literacy....

IMHO they introduced complex financial issues at too early an age.

Whoever puts these curriculums together must think we have a nation of geniuses in the classrooms.

Here's CA's Math curriculum with the financial literacy part (last column $Jumpstart)

Why would a 7th grader need to be knowledgeable about "investment alternatives" ?
Why is anyone teaching that to a 12 year old ?

https://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ma/cf/docu...wappendixa.pdf
Agreed. No reason for 7th graders being taught about investments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Once you understand the school system isn't designed to create productive citizens, it all makes sense.

The people with power and influence want a dumbed down populace who lack any kind of practical knowledge or self control because it's easier to control people that way.
So what do you suggest to create productive citizens? Or do you think productive citizens are not necessary?

Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
A statement that is beyond ridiculous. I had three advanced placement classes in high school that enabled me to earn 24 semester hours of college credit before I even set foot in the University. My son who earned in his degree in accounting and works a good job at a good salary for an accounting firm earned so many college credits in high school I couldn't keep track of them.

The problem is if you take a cross section of the population, the top 10% in skills and intelligence are likely to be the ones who reach the top 10% of high income earners. Schools can help bring talents out. I'm not convinced they make students more intelligent than they already are.
My local high school enabled my three children to graduate from college. My son graduated at the top of his HS class, went to an Ivy League school, graduated from medical school, and is now a triple board certified physician. He took as many (7) AP courses as he could possibly fit in his schedule. His Ivy League college did not give him college credit for the courses but it didn't matter. What was important was that his HS prepared him to be able to excel in college and get into medical school at a top school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2024, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,124 posts, read 23,785,288 times
Reputation: 32521
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Once you understand the school system isn't designed to create productive citizens, it all makes sense.

The people with power and influence want a dumbed down populace who lack any kind of practical knowledge or self control because it's easier to control people that way.
no
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2024, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Earth
957 posts, read 505,905 times
Reputation: 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
-High schools not offering many classes on the trades, driver's ed, or ANY skills on money management
-No classes on impulse control, self-discipline, conflict resolution, etc.
-University not offering job training or white-collar apprenticeships, forcing graduates into the catch-22 involving jobs and job experience (I'm sure you know exactly what I am talking about).

Why?

Serious question.
This is the parents job. It's not the states responsibility to teach your kid how to conduct themselves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2024, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,124 posts, read 23,785,288 times
Reputation: 32521
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCS414 View Post
This is the parents job. It's not the states responsibility to teach your kid how to conduct themselves.
I'm not sure that's completely true.

It depends on what level of 'behavior' we're talking about.

Our school had a business partner that was a VERY large, international corporation...one of the so-called "Beltway Bandits" of the Washington, D.C. area. Among its clients was the United States Military. We're talking 80 offices around the globe.

I was their guest one day for a half day that included lunch, a tour, and meetings with various department heads. They wanted to talk about how we prepared our students -- even at the middle school level -- to work in a business environment. And one of the reasons that they wanted to talk to me about it was because they had a number of our former students on their high-powered staff. All of their workers worked in work groups. Virtually no one had a private office with a solitary desk in it. How to conduct one's self is something that goes well beyond the home. And since so many parents fail to do a satisfactory job with that...well, let's just say that it's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2024, 12:55 AM
 
Location: WA
5,286 posts, read 7,577,932 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
-High schools not offering many classes on the trades, driver's ed, or ANY skills on money management
-No classes on impulse control, self-discipline, conflict resolution, etc.
-University not offering job training or white-collar apprenticeships, forcing graduates into the catch-22 involving jobs and job experience (I'm sure you know exactly what I am talking about).

Why?

Serious question.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCS414 View Post
This is the parents job. It's not the states responsibility to teach your kid how to conduct themselves.
Actually every good teacher from grades K-12 teaches those things in every class, every day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2024, 08:11 AM
 
17,471 posts, read 17,280,197 times
Reputation: 25438
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Maybe not the average kid. But athletes? HS athletes perform at a far higher level than their counterparts in the 60s. You can see this by things like school records in running, swimming, etc. And the top HS football and basketball teams from today would absolutely CRUSH their 1960s counterparts. They would make them look silly.

Student athletes today are on a whole different level. When I taught in Texas, football was a year-round sport. Athletes would be enrolled in football as their 7th period PE class and so would get coaching and weight training year-round in a manner that neatly steps around the prohibition on after school practice before August 10 or whatever the regulations say. And it was always 7th period so that they would stay after school and keep working out. Year-round. Then they would join 7 on 7 leagues and play all summer and go to special position camps in the summer hosted by all the top NCAA D1 programs.

Soccer and baseball is equally crazy with all the elite travel teams that play year-round.

There was none of that when I played HS football back in the late 70s and early 80.
I wonder how much money plays a part in this? Schools receive money and status from sports. Student athletes have the potential of earning many millions of dollars after high school if they play a certain sport well. Combine that with the regular advances in sport science and medicine and it’s understandable why such gains are made,…that and the potential issue of HGH & steroid use. Sadly, some schools prioritize athletics over academics when it comes to athletes of certain sports. While they’re required to meet a certain GPA, some schools will cut corners to help a great athlete to make the grade. I know of one such athlete. Though he graduated high school and spent four years at a major university playing football, he can barely read. He has at least one Super Bowl ring and yet he could not pass the test to become a high school football coach to officially coach the team his son was playing on in his hometown where I live. His teachers and principals didn’t do him any favors by letting him slide academically. For a great high school athlete, a sports career isn’t a guarantee nor is it a long career if they get in. One injury can end a career, either instantly or in a slow decline of a year or two. What are they going to do when their paying career is over while they’re in their 20s or 30s if they can barely read or write? Some turn to crime and drugs and alcohol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2024, 09:25 AM
 
7,272 posts, read 3,485,885 times
Reputation: 13833
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
-No classes on impulse control, self-discipline...
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Actually every good teacher from grades K-12 teaches those things in every class, every day.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCS414 View Post
This is the parents job. It's not the states responsibility to teach your kid how to conduct themselves.
A short anecdote from the local Nextdoor:
My 10 year old son just came to me and said “dad, I need to talk to you about something.” “Today I made a bad decision and was throwing snowballs at cars driving up pinebrook blvd”

Apparently a lady stopped and told him she was going to call the police.

I’m looking for this lady! If you are her, please let me know. My son wants (needs) to apologize to you.

This would have been in the afternoon on Friday Feb 2nd.

I’m proud of him for owning his mistake, but I’d also like him to be able to take it full circle.

TIA. It takes a village.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top