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Old 03-19-2024, 12:41 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
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As if the remote learning during covid didn't prove the exact opposite of what the researchers say.
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Old 03-19-2024, 12:55 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
45,379 posts, read 60,575,206 times
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Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
As if the remote learning during covid didn't prove the exact opposite of what the researchers say.
It doesn't matter. This research is done in very tightly controlled environments that are cherry picked to achieve the desired data result.

Just like the push for uniforms a couple decades ago. The schools that were studied were high need urban schools with almost out of control, mostly gang related, violence.

The kids had to wear the same clothes and what do you know? Fights over gang colors almost disappeared (although the kids found other ways to signify their affiliations) so that was extrapolated to all schools.

Hence solidly middle class and higher schools started to adopt uniforms. But their fighting problems didn't go down because they didn't have that many to begin with.

I saw that first hand and also had to become a member of the uniform police, which took up so much time. Instead of being able to pick out the dress code noncomplier you had to look at every single kid (for awhile we had to check their ****ing socks) to make sure the kid's shirt was black and not charcoal.
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Old 03-19-2024, 01:13 PM
 
Location: WA
5,444 posts, read 7,740,196 times
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Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
It reminds a bit of "middle school". I have worked in middle schools that were 5-8, 7-8, and 7-9. And my conclusion was that most districts decided on what "middle school" was by determining what existing buildings could best/most-efficiently be utilized for the middle school. It seemed to have little do with what was best from a purely educational perspective.
Around here in our district it is: elementary K-5, middle 6-8, and then HS 9-12

Back in Texas the district we were in was elementary K-4, intermediate, 5-6, middle 7-8, and then HS 9-12

And yes, mostly it is/was a consequence of the sequence in which they built buildings in a growing district.

Our current district (which is growing) is also considering building a 9th grade campus adjacent to the HS that will have separate admin, library, cafeteria, etc. and all the 9th grade core classrooms and teachers. But 9th graders will be able to walk over to the regular HS for electives, athletics, music, etc. Kind of an easing into HS that will all them to really focus on 9th grade. I think it makes a lot of sense. More sense than splitting into two separate comprehensive HS campuses that duplicate everything.
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Old 03-19-2024, 05:11 PM
 
12,847 posts, read 9,055,079 times
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Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Around here in our district it is: elementary K-5, middle 6-8, and then HS 9-12

Back in Texas the district we were in was elementary K-4, intermediate, 5-6, middle 7-8, and then HS 9-12

And yes, mostly it is/was a consequence of the sequence in which they built buildings in a growing district.

Our current district (which is growing) is also considering building a 9th grade campus adjacent to the HS that will have separate admin, library, cafeteria, etc. and all the 9th grade core classrooms and teachers. But 9th graders will be able to walk over to the regular HS for electives, athletics, music, etc. Kind of an easing into HS that will all them to really focus on 9th grade. I think it makes a lot of sense. More sense than splitting into two separate comprehensive HS campuses that duplicate everything.
The K-5 elementary, 6-8 middle, and 9-12 high is the model used around here. It may have started to fit the building, but now are new buildings around here are built to fit that model. A couple of districts have gone to the giant campus model with one elementary, one middle, and one high for the district all built on a huge campus.

Many have also gone to the 9th grade model that you mention. The jury still seems to be out on it's effectiveness overall. I know for my kids they felt it hindered rather than helped their transition to high school. And also created some schedule problems that popped up later during 10-12. The school took advantage of having all the 9th graders together to simplify the schedule so that all core classes were at the same time. Which meant that while they could take electives over in the regular high school, often they couldn't fit the schedules because there was no flex in the 9th grade schedule. Both wound up having to take summer courses between junior and senior year to compensate.
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Old 03-20-2024, 10:22 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,712 posts, read 58,054,000 times
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Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
As if the remote learning during covid didn't prove the exact opposite of what the researchers say.
Can't transport a failed burdensome educational system into the home, and expect different results than your trained, educated (?) professionals are taught (?) to deliver. Many students thrived during Covid (and many are never going back )

4 days / week of school, is 4 days too many in our household, and millions of our peers.
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Old 03-20-2024, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,809 posts, read 24,321,239 times
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Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Can't transport a failed burdensome educational system into the home, and expect different results than your trained, educated (?) professionals are taught (?) to deliver. Many students thrived during Covid (and many are never going back )

4 days / week of school, is 4 days too many in our household, and millions of our peers.
Public schools rarely miss those who leave. We tend to breath a sigh of relief and then get back to teaching all the kids that walk through the front door.
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Old 03-20-2024, 05:40 PM
 
Location: WA
5,444 posts, read 7,740,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Can't transport a failed burdensome educational system into the home, and expect different results than your trained, educated (?) professionals are taught (?) to deliver. Many students thrived during Covid (and many are never going back )

4 days / week of school, is 4 days too many in our household, and millions of our peers.
Failed education system? The US school system ranks among the best in the world when you do apples to apples comparisons. Compared to places like Sweden, what the US has is a poverty problem, not an education problem.

And homeschooling is really only an option for the affluent who can afford to have one or both parents at home. That is a small portion of the total population.
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Old 03-20-2024, 07:52 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
43,094 posts, read 18,259,632 times
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Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Public schools rarely miss those who leave. We tend to breath a sigh of relief and then get back to teaching all the kids that walk through the front door.
Not this time.
Over 1.4 million children left the system and the pandemic money ran out.

The news is full of districts all over the US cutting headcount.
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Old 03-20-2024, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,809 posts, read 24,321,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
Not this time.
Over 1.4 million children left the system and the pandemic money ran out.

The news is full of districts all over the US cutting headcount.
And that's fine. The question is whether it's a long or short term change. When it comes to anything related to covid I make no predictions.
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Old 03-20-2024, 08:48 PM
 
Location: WA
5,444 posts, read 7,740,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
Not this time.
Over 1.4 million children left the system and the pandemic money ran out.

The news is full of districts all over the US cutting headcount.
Yes, and the vast majority of those children are not engaged in quality home-schooling with stay-home parents.

They are doing things like staying home caring for young children when parents can't afford daycare, or just working rather than attending school. Or just doing nothing at all.
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