Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-11-2024, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Suburbia
8,826 posts, read 15,314,403 times
Reputation: 4533

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
20 is a stretch. Ten is probably closer to the mark in the states where I've worked (Texas and Washington). But if we use 20 that gets us to 200 days or 40 weeks of work. Out of a 52 week year, that leaves 12 weeks off, which is roughly 3 months.

Look, I'm a teacher and generally defend teachers. But the notion that teachers don't get a lot of time off (around 3 months) is absurd. Most teaching contracts are for 39 weeks which means teachers are not paid for 13 weeks out of the year. School districts typically take salaries and pro-rate them for 12 months so you get 12 paychecks. But summers and even Christmas break is not actually paid time off. You were never paid for that time to begin with. My wife is not a teacher and I have a good idea of what a normal professional working year is like.

It is entirely accurate to say that teachers get 3 months off per year. But technically it is unpaid time off, not paid time.

And yes, there are some teachers who do professional development or other duties in the summer. There are summer AP workshops and such. But you technically don't need to do those things. There are usually plenty of professional development activities during the school year with which you can get your required hours. And if teachers are actually working in the summer such as teaching summer school, then they get paid for it.
Yes. I know the math. I never said teachers don’t get a lot of time off. I was just pointing out in my state of VA the contract is typically 15-20 days longer than the student calendar.

When I first started teaching I taught summer school. Of course I got paid for it. After about my 10th year or so in 2003 I stopped. After that I never did a thing for school after our contract ended in June and when it started back up in August.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2024, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Suburbia
8,826 posts, read 15,314,403 times
Reputation: 4533
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
20 is a stretch. Ten is probably closer to the mark in the states where I've worked (Texas and Washington). But if we use 20 that gets us to 200 days or 40 weeks of work. Out of a 52 week year, that leaves 12 weeks off, which is roughly 3 months.

Look, I'm a teacher and generally defend teachers. But the notion that teachers don't get a lot of time off (around 3 months) is absurd. Most teaching contracts are for 39 weeks which means teachers are not paid for 13 weeks out of the year. School districts typically take salaries and pro-rate them for 12 months so you get 12 paychecks. But summers and even Christmas break is not actually paid time off. You were never paid for that time to begin with. My wife is not a teacher and I have a good idea of what a normal professional working year is like.

It is entirely accurate to say that teachers get 3 months off per year. But technically it is unpaid time off, not paid time.

And yes, there are some teachers who do professional development or other duties in the summer. There are summer AP workshops and such. But you technically don't need to do those things. There are usually plenty of professional development activities during the school year with which you can get your required hours. And if teachers are actually working in the summer such as teaching summer school, then they get paid for it.
The standard 10-month contract shall include 200 days, including (i) a minimum of 180 teaching days or 990 instructional hours and (ii) up to 20 days for activities such as teaching, participating in professional development, planning, evaluating, completing records and reports, participating on committees or in conferences, or such other activities as may be assigned or approved by the local school board.

https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/...tees%20or%20in
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 06:11 PM
 
Location: WA
5,439 posts, read 7,730,554 times
Reputation: 8549
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
The standard 10-month contract shall include 200 days, including (i) a minimum of 180 teaching days or 990 instructional hours and (ii) up to 20 days for activities such as teaching, participating in professional development, planning, evaluating, completing records and reports, participating on committees or in conferences, or such other activities as may be assigned or approved by the local school board.

https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/...tees%20or%20in
Which gives you 12 weeks off or nearly 3 months if they go the full 20 days of inservice training. Which usually doesn't happen except perhaps for new teachers going through new teacher orientation which can add a few additional days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Southern California
12,767 posts, read 14,966,979 times
Reputation: 15331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
Where is this happening?
Nothing like that anywhere near me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Primarily in the Midwest and Mountain states. In some cases it's due to a lack of staff, in others a lack of students.

Advocates say that the financial savings are enormous.
What?! Where was this the entire time I was a student in school AND then a teacher myself? I sure would have loved it both times, but oh well! I've been out of school now & done being a teacher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Suburbia
8,826 posts, read 15,314,403 times
Reputation: 4533
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Which gives you 12 weeks off or nearly 3 months if they go the full 20 days of inservice training. Which usually doesn't happen except perhaps for new teachers going through new teacher orientation which can add a few additional days.
Yes. I'm not sure why the part keeps getting repeated. Obviously, if the contract is for 40 weeks there remains 12 weeks that are not under contract.

My district's contract is 195 days. Teachers work those 195 days. There are 5 work days before students start. Non-student contact days are all designated as teacher workdays, school planning or staff development days.

New teachers have 199.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,770 posts, read 24,277,952 times
Reputation: 32913
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
Yes. I'm not sure why the part keeps getting repeated. Obviously, if the contract is for 40 weeks there remains 12 weeks that are not under contract.

My district's contract is 195 days. Teachers work those 195 days. There are 5 work days before students start. Non-student contact days are all designated as teacher workdays, school planning or staff development days.

New teachers have 199.
As I recall (perhaps incorrectly), you're in FFX, and that is exactly the way it was when I was there for 22 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 08:28 PM
 
19,717 posts, read 10,114,371 times
Reputation: 13074
Our local districts went back after Labor Day for many years. That let farm kids help with harvest. I helped with the corn harvest every fall, and did not live on a farm. Now school resumes the middle of August.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 09:24 PM
 
Location: WA
5,439 posts, read 7,730,554 times
Reputation: 8549
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
Yes. I'm not sure why the part keeps getting repeated. Obviously, if the contract is for 40 weeks there remains 12 weeks that are not under contract.

My district's contract is 195 days. Teachers work those 195 days. There are 5 work days before students start. Non-student contact days are all designated as teacher workdays, school planning or staff development days.

New teachers have 199.
I'm just pushing back on the notion (often promoted by teachers) that teachers get nowhere near 3 months off work. You hear this vigorously repeated again and again. Even by teacher unions. I'm a teacher and have been for 17 years and I've always had around 3 months off when you add it all up including Christmas and Spring Break and the other holidays and snow days scattered through the year. I also know what it is like to work a regular professional job when you are lucky to get 3-4 weeks off. I didn't get into teaching until about 40 years old.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,770 posts, read 24,277,952 times
Reputation: 32913
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
I'm just pushing back on the notion (often promoted by teachers) that teachers get nowhere near 3 months off work. You hear this vigorously repeated again and again. Even by teacher unions. I'm a teacher and have been for 17 years and I've always had around 3 months off when you add it all up including Christmas and Spring Break and the other holidays and snow days scattered through the year. I also know what it is like to work a regular professional job when you are lucky to get 3-4 weeks off. I didn't get into teaching until about 40 years old.
If 'they' are going to ask teachers to work at 48-50 week year, then add in some more $$$.

Back before I became a principal, and was still teaching, I was the assistant wrestling coach. And people would say, "Well, gee, you get a good emolument for that". So the second year I kept track of time spent versus emolument. It came out to 4 cents an hour.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2024, 12:19 AM
 
Location: WA
5,439 posts, read 7,730,554 times
Reputation: 8549
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
If 'they' are going to ask teachers to work at 48-50 week year, then add in some more $$$.

Back before I became a principal, and was still teaching, I was the assistant wrestling coach. And people would say, "Well, gee, you get a good emolument for that". So the second year I kept track of time spent versus emolument. It came out to 4 cents an hour.
I coached my 3 daughters in youth soccer for 15 years. Which was fun and if you are going to take them back and forth to practice anyway, might as well run things the way you want to run it. I got sick of watching other dads botch the job.

But I would never in a million years coach anything HS. Not that stupid. When 3:45 rolls around I'm gone like clockwork (I arrive around 7:30 am so that is a full 8 hour day).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top