Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-10-2024, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Northern California
4,597 posts, read 2,988,358 times
Reputation: 8349

Advertisements

1) Nutrition / Food Shopping / Meal Preparation

2) Personal Finance -- not only "balancing a checkbook," but the ABCs of leases, loans, insurance, etc.

3) Basic "around the house" skills.

4) Work -- how to apply for a job, what say at the interview, what to do on the first day, etc.

5) Media Savvy -- deconstructing deceptive political statements, crafty sales ads, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-10-2024, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
10,062 posts, read 7,229,638 times
Reputation: 17146
What I wish I'd learned was sewing, cooking, and some basic mechanics/how to fix stuff. Especially cooking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 07:46 AM
 
9,848 posts, read 7,712,566 times
Reputation: 24480
I employ teens and these are the things that I see lacking in many of them, things they should be able to do by this age:

1. Be polite, good manners
2. Listen carefully and follow directions
3. Clean up after yourself, you don't come to a job and leave a mess
4. Be able to write legibly
5. Know how to address an envelope and tell time
6. Know how to use a broom, mop and vacuum
7. Be friendly to coworkers and customers
8. Be able to put your phone away
9. Show up to work when scheduled and on time
10. Communication - be comfortable asking and answering questions, be honest
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 08:44 AM
 
17,597 posts, read 17,629,777 times
Reputation: 25655
Food prep-include the basics of food preparation and food safety. I took home ec in high school and the basics of cooling helped me when I was a single adult. By the time I took the class I had already been cooking eggs (boiled, fried, scrambled), home made burgers, and other light cooking meals. Having this course gave me some more knowledge and made me realize how many of my classmates never cooked anything in the kitchen. If you want to become an independent adult you need some basic cooking skills.

Personal finance/budget. Had this lesson in an elective I took in high school, most important lesson was the difference between a NEED and a WANT. Teacher really stripped it down for us to fully understand what each meant. A need was something you physically needed to survive and a want is something you could do without to survive. Examples of need included shelter (home, apartment, and utilities), food, transportation, and clothing. After leaving the Navy I was so poor that I was living in an efficiency apartment that didn’t have a stove and I had no cable tv, no satellite tv, no internet, no cell phone, and my only communication was a basic landline phone. Restaurants were a luxury. But I survived.

Home maintenance. Start with explaining basic tools and how to use them. Move on to DIY home maintenance. Toilet (unclog, replace flapper valve, replace flushing valve, replace toilet seat, replace wax seal), sink (unclog, faucet repair), water heater (flushing and adjusting), washer/dryer service, and home safety (fire, electricity, and don’t mix cleaners).

Sadly many young people today lack communication skills, both verbal and writing. While they can communicate with their classmates, their abbreviated speech and writing does not translate across other generations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
4,507 posts, read 2,651,635 times
Reputation: 12990
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
So budgeting then, not balancing checkbooks.

My kids all learned that fairly easily without having to take a class in it during middle school or high school in lieu of an elective that they would rather have taken. Actual life has a way of quickly teaching you lessons.
It's not just budgeting, and it certainly isn't about balancing an old-fashioned checkbook. What's needed, since a very large number of parents aren't communicating this, is "personal finance - how money works in the real world".

What are wages? How is your income taxed? Why is "writing it off on your taxes" almost always NOT the advantage people claim it is?
How do you go about saving some money? How do you open a bank account?
How do credit cards work, both in the Pay-it-off-every-month mode and in the carry-over-the balance mode?
How much of an impact does interest on debt have to your finances?
What is a mortgage and how does it work?
How do you set up a budget for your income, to cover necessities, desires, and savings for the future?
What is investing, how does it work, and what are the kinds of investment vehicles suitable to a young person with a typical young person's income and expenses?
How do car loans work? Leases?
What is insurance, what is it for, how does it work, and why do you need it for some things and not for some others?

Many other subjects could be added to these.

A second one would be something like "Relationship Advice".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 09:49 AM
 
Location: USA
9,111 posts, read 6,155,520 times
Reputation: 29884
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
What's with the obsession with balancing a checkbook?

I have 3 daughters ages 18, 21, and 25. None of them ever bother to balance a checkbook because they don't actually use checks. They have checking accounts linked to ATM/Debit cards and most of the transactions we used to do with actual checks (rent, bills, etc.) are done electronically. My 25 year old daughter who is a marketing executive and makes good money has never owned printed checks. They aren't needed in today's digital world.

All transactions are virtually instant and their banks have phone apps that let them see all their transactions instantly. They can set the account to pay overdrafts via a savings account, or just to not pay any overdrafts in which case the transaction is declined at the cash register.

The main point of balancing a checkbook is so that you know how many outstanding checks you have written that have not been cashed so that you know what your true checking balance is and can avoid writing bad checks. Neither of those two things happens anymore.

Learning how to live within a budget, sure. But balancing a checkbooks is so "boomer" to today's HS students. It isn't something they are ever going to do.

"Balancing a checkbook" is a metaphor for ensuring you and the bank agree on how much money is in your account.

At the end of each day, I open my bank's app and look at the transactions that occurred in all my accounts, both banking and credit cards. If they are correct and I agree with the bank's records, I have effectively "balanced my checkbook".

Don't get your panties in wad because some of us use outdated nomenclature.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
23,656 posts, read 13,964,967 times
Reputation: 18855
Two things and then one more I have learned in life, granted perhaps from interesting sources, that can't be put into one sentence.

1. "What could mess this up?". In freshman chemistry, the tests were multiple choice Various chemistry word problems that one had to work through and pick the correct answer. So the way they wrote down the answers was to go through the problem, put down the correct answer, and then sit back and ask the question, "How could one proceed through this problem wrong? Ahhh," and then work the problem wrong and put down that answer as a possible, and repeat the wrong question, work through the problem in correctly, and put down those answers.

So, when I have a major project, I look at various steps and ask, "What could mess this up?", figure that out, and go off to solve the problem before it happens.

On a different approach, I call this "Mission Offence, Mission Defence, Mission Support". Offence is what you are there for, what is the goal. Support are all the things to help you accomplish the goal. Defence is figuring out what could mess this up and solving it before it happens.

2. "Devil's Advocate": a process where one sits back and asks themselves, "Okay, show me that I am interpreting the data incorrectly and present me with another plausible analysis of the data." A and B. A: This is something we DON'T SEE so often in TV and movies. There, they present only one possible answer which is the correct answer even though there are other possibilities. Some movie where there is a rogue sniper who knows rappelling, HtH, camouflage, and is a crack shot: Movie conclusion, they have to be a SEAL and never bother with other sections that have those skills, too. Or in Star Trek: TNG, "Time's Arrow" where they have Data's head and only move on the possibility that it is either Data or Lore and never consider that there are others. Our movies teach us not to be open minded.

B: For this method of the mind, it helps to have some level of multiple personality ability....such as what an actor might have. That is, "Okay, Julia, play "Esmeralda" but not as the kind angelic person but a vindictive drunk."--the director

3. A protection ability where to prevent someone from hurting me emotionally, I shift my personalty points to one side or another, essentially changing the characteristics of the receptors the enemy is attacking so the receptors can no longer receive the attack.

BUT, there are risks. Usually, it is a temporary condition that has to be actively applied and after the attack, I go back to being "human". If the state remains on, however, well as Amundsen (Sean Connery) said in "The Red Tent", "A man who becomes indifferent to his own unhappiness becomes indifferent to everything.". I take that quote as "If you are indifferent to your own pain, you become indifferent to the pain of others.".

Last edited by TamaraSavannah; 03-11-2024 at 10:07 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 09:56 AM
 
1,197 posts, read 527,858 times
Reputation: 2812
1. Emotional Intelligence: Emotional regulation, self-soothing
2. Values Assessment
3. Myers-Briggs, Enneagram for self-awareness, awareness of others
4. Trouble-shooting, problem-solving skills, methods
5. Balancing Physical, spiritual, emotional, community issues, needs, resources, practices
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 10:38 AM
 
206 posts, read 134,321 times
Reputation: 551
  • 4 days school
  • One day Life skills (community based, not school based)
  1. Informative interviews with businesses they are interested in.
  2. Volunteering in Community services (from seniors services to cleaning up and trimming / planting in the parks they use.
  3. Learning to effectively communicate across generations and cultures.
  4. Shopping (for value) - What does your SNAP payment buy as far as nutrition value?
  5. Basic finance. "Here is your parent's paycheck;, this is where each dollar goes". THIS is what remains! (nothing? minus?)
  6. Banking / investing (TVM, FVM, Taxation, school levy funding)
  7. Cooking / serving at the homeless shelter.
  8. Basic skills - (like the Menz Sheds in NZ) Engage the community to help, and the community benefits
  9. Life long learning and reflections on the future quality of life. (Follow some of the exhaustive sociology studies) Cradle to grave. "Here is how your choices are likely to turn out."

BTW, This cannot be accomplished by, or within the school, or those who are career educators. Or should it be.

Look into a comprehensive 'life' model. That is NOT school, fortunately once out of school, you never again are stuck age segregated (unless your church still does that) Youth groups, senior saints, young married, College and career age... (That's only 1-2 hours / week rather than 40+)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2024, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
4,507 posts, read 2,651,635 times
Reputation: 12990
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
I employ teens and these are the things that I see lacking in many of them, things they should be able to do by this age:

1. Be polite, good manners
2. Listen carefully and follow directions
3. Clean up after yourself, you don't come to a job and leave a mess
4. Be able to write legibly
5. Know how to address an envelope and tell time
6. Know how to use a broom, mop and vacuum
7. Be friendly to coworkers and customers
8. Be able to put your phone away
9. Show up to work when scheduled and on time
10. Communication - be comfortable asking and answering questions, be honest
11. Speak UP! Don't mumble at top speed while facing away from the person who asked you a question!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top