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Old 05-11-2024, 12:34 PM
 
822 posts, read 552,071 times
Reputation: 2329

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This was in response to my suggestion that our leaders decided in the 1980ss to deliberate4ly dumb down the education of the masses.


I suggested two motives:
1) in order to increase the percentage of the population that was literate, it was necessary ot lower the standards.
2) A less educated populace is easier to control and govern.



Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I don't believe it's this. While I pretty much disagree with most of the educators on here, I don't doubt their sincerity about what they believe. I think they honestly believe they are being kind and helpful.

I'm so used to talking to an echo chamber, that I forget that not everyone has the same background information. A good place to start is https://www.amazon.com/dp/0814713653, The Crisis of Democracy, published by the Trilateral Commission in 1977 or so. It was a high-level overview of how to handle the demonstrations and riots that were so endemic in the 70s. One suggestion, among others, was to pivot from using education to build an educated citizenry to simply be job training,



Key to doing that was to wrest control from the locals to the feds. Reagan created the Dept of Education. Charlotte Iserbyt, one of the first people in the newly created Dept of Education, was appalled by what she saw. She was an old-fashioned educator, and was totally opposed to the agenda of dumbing down the citizenry. She wrote several books and hosted a website with an overwhelming amount of material. She's dead now, but her website lives on, (for a while).
If you care about this material, I suggest you download and save it. https://deliberatedumbingdown.com/ddd/


I've no doubt about the sincere motives of the average worker bee, but most have no idea what the upper echelon is planning, and most really don't care. They just want to get on with their lives. The fact that they don't know what the leadership at the international level has in mind is irrelevant, unless they want to get engaged, and most do not.
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Old 05-11-2024, 01:51 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
45,579 posts, read 60,955,074 times
Reputation: 61314
Quote:
Originally Posted by margaretBartle View Post
This was in response to my suggestion that our leaders decided in the 1980ss to deliberate4ly dumb down the education of the masses.


I suggested two motives:
1) in order to increase the percentage of the population that was literate, it was necessary ot lower the standards.
2) A less educated populace is easier to control and govern.






I'm so used to talking to an echo chamber, that I forget that not everyone has the same background information. A good place to start is https://www.amazon.com/dp/0814713653, The Crisis of Democracy, published by the Trilateral Commission in 1977 or so. It was a high-level overview of how to handle the demonstrations and riots that were so endemic in the 70s. One suggestion, among others, was to pivot from using education to build an educated citizenry to simply be job training,



Key to doing that was to wrest control from the locals to the feds. Reagan created the Dept of Education. Charlotte Iserbyt, one of the first people in the newly created Dept of Education, was appalled by what she saw. She was an old-fashioned educator, and was totally opposed to the agenda of dumbing down the citizenry. She wrote several books and hosted a website with an overwhelming amount of material. She's dead now, but her website lives on, (for a while).
If you care about this material, I suggest you download and save it. https://deliberatedumbingdown.com/ddd/


I've no doubt about the sincere motives of the average worker bee, but most have no idea what the upper echelon is planning, and most really don't care. They just want to get on with their lives. The fact that they don't know what the leadership at the international level has in mind is irrelevant, unless they want to get engaged, and most do not.
No, that was Carter, at least its modern iteration.
https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/f...of%20Education.
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Old 05-11-2024, 04:21 PM
 
822 posts, read 552,071 times
Reputation: 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
No, that was Carter, at least its modern iteration.
https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/f...of%20Education.

Thanks for the correction. I didn't feel like looking it up, I'm glad you did.
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Old 05-12-2024, 10:29 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,308 posts, read 108,461,911 times
Reputation: 116360
Quote:
Originally Posted by margaretBartle View Post
I'm not talking about people posting comments, or social media or other informal writing, I'm talking about headline writers and authors of mainstream news organizations who are being paid as professionals.



I just saw a headline talking about "Millenials and Hire Education" I don't see this kind of error every day but I see it often enough by professionals that I have to wonder what it portends.


I'm an elder now, and I remember when I was a teenager, the laments of the older crowd concerned that formal manner and education were being eroded, and I sneered at those comments. Now I feel my comuppance, as I make similar observations.


I feel like it goes along with lowering the standards of admission, and lowering the requirements for graduation - a part of the dumbing down of America.



On the other hand, this may be the inevitable result of expanding the student base. After WWII, the decision was gradually made over a few decades to deliberately expand the literacy rate in the US, and populations that traditionally were not educated became more educated. The percent of the population that could read increased, but the average reading level dropped.



I remember reading in the 70s and 80s that too much education made it more difficult to control the population, and so our leaders starting dumbing down the educational system. Charlotte Iserbyte, in the new Dept of Education int he Reagan administration talked a lot about that.



Maybe lower level of professionalism is just an expansion of that process - only instead of expanding the literacy rate in the US while lowering the average, they are expanding the literacy rate for global population, with a result lowering of the average.


It's a slow process, I don't know if I'll be around long enough to see how it ends.
I think it's due to a lack of proofreading one's work, for whatever reason. I find, that posting online and using a computer keyboard that allows for much faster typing than on an electric typewriter (remember those?), I make similar errors, which I'd never do if writing something out by hand or working on a slower keyboard. Sometimes I don't proofread my posts, so those errors get permanently posted. (cringe)

Still, people working for news outlets should take more care, you'd think. So I don't really have a complete answer to your concern.
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Old 05-12-2024, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
51,132 posts, read 24,617,542 times
Reputation: 33152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I think it's due to a lack of proofreading one's work, for whatever reason. I find, that posting online and using a computer keyboard that allows for much faster typing than on an electric typewriter (remember those?), I make similar errors, which I'd never do if writing something out by hand or working on a slower keyboard. Sometimes I don't proofread my posts, so those errors get permanently posted. (cringe)

Still, people working for news outlets should take more care, you'd think. So I don't really have a complete answer to your concern.
There's a lot to what you say.

A couple of days ago a headline on either CNN or MSNBC website caught my eye. I can't remember the topic now, but it was about something that happened in some city here in Untied States. There was only one problem...in the whole article it didn't mention what city it had happened in.
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Old 05-12-2024, 01:58 PM
 
19,755 posts, read 10,199,632 times
Reputation: 13137
It is easy to "think a word" and forget to type it.

The Weather Channel has some awful headlines.
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Old 05-12-2024, 10:41 PM
 
11,666 posts, read 12,775,793 times
Reputation: 15834
What about TV anchors who can't decode? During a recent interview with Mark Critch, the anchor mistakenly pronounced Newfoundland as New Finland. He mispronounced the word twice. The little speaker in his ear with the director's voice didn't correct it and neither did Newfoundland native Mark Critch, no doubt to avoid embarrassing the anchor. Then on CNN, another anchor mispronounced dais as die-is. She mispronounced it several times throughout the segment. Again, no one corrected her-except me, but she couldn't hear me through the screen.
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Old 05-13-2024, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
8,152 posts, read 7,537,350 times
Reputation: 16448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I think it's due to a lack of proofreading one's work, for whatever reason...
I sometimes type "there" instead of "their" and vice-versa. I do try to proofread my internet posts and my work memos, and I'm thankful C-D gives us a window to edit posts. Though there are times when I spot a typo I've made, days later, and I wonder how I could have missed it.
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Old 05-13-2024, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Southern MN
12,128 posts, read 8,523,626 times
Reputation: 45083
Made me laugh. Mom, who taught for forty years and whose English was stellar, used to read my letters with red pencil in hand and later I got a chance to "check my work." When we buried her we rented an old wooden school desk and put a brass bell and a red marking pencil on it along with the bouquet.

Needless to say when I see what passes for grammar on the internet, I grit my teeth and it grates on my figurative ears. I do tend to use a sloppy conversational style for tone but I can write a professional article if need be. That's my personal qualifier for atypical.

The one that really gets me is "Me and him." That's ignorance and rampant online and over the airwaves.

But sometimes the result is hilarious or outrageous and when it is the folks in our basement here, down in the Writing Forum under "I Can't Take it Anymore," have provided a spot to quote the fun ones and have a little levity with the mess.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/writ...l#post66709735
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Old 05-13-2024, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
8,152 posts, read 7,537,350 times
Reputation: 16448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
The one that really gets me is "Me and him." That's ignorance and rampant online and over the airwaves.
A variant is "Please see Principal Jones or myself...". As if using a longer word must be correct, because the writer has a vague idea that "me" is too informal and is erring on the side of formality. Don't get me started on "it's".

The internet is a pretty informal place overall. I frequently use the word "gonna" and I call people "dude" now and again. Of course it depends on the context. I wouldn't do that if I was writing headlines for Fox News or CNN.
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