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Old 12-18-2008, 03:28 PM
 
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Where I live, there is a long tradition of having Charter Schools. They also tend to outperform regular public schools. So the question I have is, if the charter school models work so well, why don't we convert all of our schools according to these models?

[On the other hand, if you don't think charter schools work, why not? And if so, is there any reason why we should keep them around?]
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Old 12-18-2008, 06:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwynn View Post
They also tend to outperform regular public schools. if so, is there any reason why we should keep them around?]
Do you have antying to back up this statement? My understanding was that they do worse than public schools with similar student populations.
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Old 12-18-2008, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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I would evaluate each school individually, as I would any school.
Some private schools sucks, some private schools shine.
It's all about the kind of education you want for your child and what lengths you will go to in order for them to receive it.

I attended a charter school in 8th grade, I didn't really see it any differently than my other schools besides the fact that we got out about an hour-90 minutes later than everyone else. Most of this time was taken up by electives. I would have rather they used it by allowing students to take an extra math class, reading class, etc or whatnot if that was a subject they needed extra help in. If you didn't need extra help, you can take an elective class. I made straight As all through it but looking back on it...I bet some of my classmates would have benefited from having an extra math or reading class.
Granted it was the first year of the charter school so...I'm sure they learned a lot after the first year.
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Old 12-18-2008, 08:25 PM
 
268 posts, read 982,930 times
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Originally Posted by Sam82 View Post
Do you have antying to back up this statement? My understanding was that they do worse than public schools with similar student populations.
Four charter high schools grant diplomas to their first graduates : City & Region : The Buffalo News (http://www.buffalonews.com/102/story/381651.html - broken link)
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Old 12-19-2008, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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I did an evaluation of some charter schools and I can tell you that the ones that I evaluated were NOT performing better than general public. Perhaps we should focus on making all public schools better rather than trying out all these other ventures.
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Old 12-19-2008, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessiegirl_98 View Post
I did an evaluation of some charter schools and I can tell you that the ones that I evaluated were NOT performing better than general public. Perhaps we should focus on making all public schools better rather than trying out all these other ventures.
I agree. I see nothing wrong experimenting in public schools. It's better than doing nothing at all.
I think if we see success in charter schools that use a certain model, we should implement it in public schools rather than keeping that success strictly for the charter schools.
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Old 12-19-2008, 02:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by coldwynn View Post
Four charter high schools grant diplomas to their first graduates : City & Region : The Buffalo News (http://www.buffalonews.com/102/story/381651.html - broken link)
The article does not really talk about charter schools as a whole. It was not too helpful.

There are some very successfull public schools. There are some very successful charter schools. There are so many factors that determine a school's success.

I have to say that we have a charter school right near my school (which is public). We have had a lot of transfers from the charter school. To my knowledge, we have had very few students transfer out of our school to the charter school.

Charter schools do not require their teachers to be liscened or even have degrees in education or the subjects that they teach. They usually cannot offer all of the extra services that public schools can. One of my students told me that he transferred to our school from the charter school because they did not offer the services he needed (I didn't ask what the services were).

Overall, I think it is nice for parents to have choices. If they want to enroll their children in a charter school that appeals to them, I say go for it.
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Old 12-19-2008, 05:00 PM
 
268 posts, read 982,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam82 View Post
The article does not really talk about charter schools as a whole. It was not too helpful.
I was trying to point out that in my city, charter schools in urban settings do much better than urban public schools. We therefore need to seriously look at why they do better and see if what they do is portable to public schools in the same setting.

But if you want more data, try these:
New Research Brings Good News About Charter Schools

The data by the noted Harvard economist has been debated and questioned, however, to my mind that only seriously points out that we need to see what these schools are doing well because it seems that radical, out-of-the-box solutions are needed to fix our ailing public schools.
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Old 12-19-2008, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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In Colorado, the Charter School Act was supposed to encourage innovative education programs for poor kids. In the implementation, it has spawned a lot of "high academic" type programs of various types (Core Knowledge, Montessori, Denver High School of Science and Technology), and some special schools such as the Denver High School for the Performng Arts (I am not sure these are the exact names).

There have been some charter schools that have failed, including a middle school organized by some middle school teachers. Although admission is by lottery, people are at times "counseled out" of certain programs. A poster on the Colorado forum said his kids did better after they were pulled out of their charter school and went back to regular public school.

So, I guess you could say, results are spotty. People who think they can run schools better than the adminitrators have sometimes found out they can't. Also, a lot of people send their kids to these charter schools, especially the "high academics" schools to "straighten their kids out", so the population is similar to what you'd find in the PS anyway.
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Old 12-20-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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I do agree though that you need to evaluate each school for what it is. There are probably charter schools that are better than some public, many public better than private, private better than public, public better than charter... OK, I'll stop ;-)
Seriously though, it just depends on the school.
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