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Old 12-06-2007, 01:02 PM
 
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I dont remember the origin of this thought that popped up in my head, i dont remember if this is a true fact or something somebody told me playing, but have any of you heard this before, i remember hearing something that stated that mt franklin, used to be an active volcano, & that if you hike up theirs supposed to be a big crater.
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Old 12-06-2007, 01:17 PM
 
Location: El Paso
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I don't remember hearing anything about it being a volcano but Hondo Pass (at the foot of the mountain in the Northeast) is where a fault line is located.
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Old 12-06-2007, 06:08 PM
 
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No the Franklins are not a dormant volcano, but I've heard that Picacho Peak in Las Cruces was, I myself dont think so, but yet if you google earth up the upper valley between Anthony and Las Cruces alongside the valley and desert you will find something that does resemble an ancient dormant vocano with a crater and what appears to be melted magma, you'll see alot of green growth around it and the soil looks pretty red and Martian looking.
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Old 12-06-2007, 06:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HIGH!Lonesome View Post
No the Franklins are not a dormant volcano, but I've heard that Picacho Peak in Las Cruces was, I myself dont think so, but yet if you google earth up the upper valley between Anthony and Las Cruces alongside the valley and desert you will find something that does resemble an ancient dormant vocano with a crater and what appears to be melted magma, you'll see alot of green growth around it and the soil looks pretty red and Martian looking.
can i get a link?
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Old 12-07-2007, 03:52 AM
 
Location: The Coldest Place
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Actually, if memory serves me, the whole area is a huge rift valley (a continental plate tearing itself in two), from Colorado, down through New Mexico all the way along the Rio Grande down through to El Paso and on into Chihuahua. So whoever said that may be somewhat right, as there has been major volcanic activity in the area in the distant past, especially the further north you go up the river valley (there are still hot springs and verified dormant volcanoes in NM and CO).

That said, if my college geology courses gave me any sort of insight, I'd guess that the Franklins are not volcanoes, but rather layers of sedimentary rock (El Paso area was on the edge of an ancient sea, some 500 million years ago, well before the Franklins or the rift were formed) that have been pushed up due to buckling, which is why they have that angled, layered look. There have been periods of intense volcanic activity in the area since the rocks that make up the Franklins were formed, which have intruded into the existing strata, so this may be where your rumor has it's origins, and in that case, it's probably more truth than rumor.

I read a geologic history of the area once, I'll see if I can dig it up again.

Edit:

I found this from Wiki:

The Franklin Mountains of Texas are a small range (23 miles long, 3 miles wide) that extend from El Paso, Texas north into New Mexico. The Franklins were formed during the Laramide mountain-building period in late Cretaceous time, 60 million to 70 million years ago.

The highest peak is North Franklin Mountain at 7,192 feet or 2,192 meters. Much of the range is part of the Franklin Mountains State Park. The mountains are composed primarily of sedimentary rock with some igneous intrusions. Geologists refer to them as tilted-block fault mountains and in them can be found billion-year-old Precambrian rocks, the oldest in Texas.


The rift started about 30 million years ago, so the Franklins are older than the rift valley.

Then here I found:

Volcanism in New Mexico is not "extinct," but is dormant. The record of volcanism in New Mexico is continuous over tens of millions of years, and there is no reason to think it stopped magically 3000 years ago with the eruption of several cubic kilometers of basalt (McCartys lava flow, El Malpais). New Mexico has one of only three large mid-crustal active magma bodies (Socorro) in the continent. (The others are Long Valley, California and Yellowstone, Wyoming.) The Socorro area is one of the few areas where there is a dearth of young volcanoes, so perhaps the Rift is working on filling out its volcano landscaping.

Every major type of volcanic landform (composite volcano, shield volcano, volcanic caldera, major ash-flows, pahoehoe and aa lava, maar crater, fissure eruptions, cinder cones) occurs in New Mexico.


More info on the rift valley & the Franklins:

(This first link discusses Plutons, which are sort of like baby volcanoes that never quite became volcanoes. Cristo Rey is one and there are others in the area)

Brief Geological History: El Paso-Juarez Region

Franklin Mountains (Texas) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rio Grande Rift - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Rio Grande Rift

Rio Grande Rift F.A.Q.

Last edited by Guero; 12-07-2007 at 04:44 AM..
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Old 12-07-2007, 09:35 PM
 
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Aren't the Franklins the tip of the Sangre De Cristo Mtn. range?
Here in Albuquerque we have 5 dormant volcanos stradling the west side of the city limits.
I live in a community called Ventana Ranch which was built ontop of ancient lava flows, the ground has to be filled with about 10 feet of dirt in this part of town to build on it, because it would be too expensive to remove the 30 feet deep of lava flow.
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Old 12-13-2007, 07:58 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Lightbulb old rumors:mt franklin is a dormant volcano!

Maybe what you're referring to is the Thunderbird formation that's visible on the west side of the Franklins. It's the remains of an old volcano from about a billion years ago - buried and now resurfaced by the uplift.
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Old 12-13-2007, 05:05 PM
 
Location: El Paso, TX
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Someone mentioned the red scorch marks near El Paso, do you mean these?

http://maps.google.com/maps?ie=UTF8&...&t=h&z=10&om=1

But this out near McNary sure looks like a volcano too me..

http://maps.google.com/maps?ie=UTF8&...&t=h&z=10&om=1
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Old 12-13-2007, 05:39 PM
 
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Thats pretty much volcano to me, is'nt that Rocks New Mexico west of El Paso, nothing but lava beds, as a kid we went there once to retrive volcano rocks, very interesting area, I hope to explore it more in the near future.

But also taking this old country road going from Canutillo to Las Cruces when you arrive close to Stalman Farms I did see what look very much like an ancient volcano, it resembled Carny Park in Naples Italy, crater and greenery all over.
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Old 12-14-2007, 12:11 AM
 
Location: The Coldest Place
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As I understand it, almost all of south central New Mexico is volcanic.

"Sierra Blanca is a massive complex of volcanic rocks including pyroclastic materials, lava flows, and intrusions. An ancient and heavily eroded volcanic pile, it is the largest mid-Tertiary volcanic complex east of the Rio Grande with an estimated volume of erupted products of 185 cu mi (770 km³). Eruptions began about 38 million years ago, and extended over a 12 million year period. Most of the eruptions produced volumnious lava flows and breccias, with numerous intrusive dikes emplaced throughout the complex. The final activity produced the intrusions which form the present-day Sierra Blanca Peak. Erosion and block faulting after volcanism ceased exposed the intrusions and produced the mountain range's current form, modified somewhat by Pleistoceneglaciation."

Note: By "Sierra Blanca", the don't mean just Sierra Blanca peak, they mean the whole range in Lincoln and Otero counties.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_Blanca
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