U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > El Paso
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-29-2021, 08:18 PM
 
5,900 posts, read 13,761,685 times
Reputation: 6412

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I find that city data extremely overstates the level of Mexican-Americans anywhere speak in Spanish
Even in the Texas border towns, education is conducted in English.
I have nieces, nephews, even first cousins who cannot speak one word of Spanish. They look the part, but do not understand, or speak it. It is weird to witness, but totally understandable.

I recall in the first grade, I was in school in El Paso and was speaking to my friends (boys) in Spanish... the teacher broke us up, and I was reprimanded because I was speaking in Spanish to my friends... in the courtyard, on our recess!

Maybe someone can relate... I will say, I went to Kindergarten, and my teacher was Mrs. Bilderback in Del Norte Elementary! I hated that witch. When I progressed to the 'First' grade, guess what, I had that bytch agian! She was a racist, hated us Mexican/American kids.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-30-2021, 01:33 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA>Tijuana, BC>San Antonio, TX
5,167 posts, read 5,312,364 times
Reputation: 4930
I would say there is a good amount of truly bilingual folks in El Paso as opposed to somewhere like San Antonio.

15% of Mexican Americans that only speak English
35% of Mexican Americans that can speak some or at least broken Spanish.
25% of Mexican Americans that are fully bilingual.
and the other 25% are Mexican immigrants or Mexican Nationals (that live in Juarez but shop/work in El Paso) that speak only Spanish.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-30-2021, 04:28 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
1,472 posts, read 2,442,535 times
Reputation: 1803
Quote:
Originally Posted by malcorub16 View Post
I would say there is a good amount of truly bilingual folks in El Paso as opposed to somewhere like San Antonio.

15% of Mexican Americans that only speak English
35% of Mexican Americans that can speak some or at least broken Spanish.
25% of Mexican Americans that are fully bilingual.
and the other 25% are Mexican immigrants or Mexican Nationals (that live in Juarez but shop/work in El Paso) that speak only Spanish.
This is true, but San Antonio still surprised me. It actually has a very low foreign-born population compared to the other major cities in Texas, but plenty of locally born Tex-Mex folks seem to converse in Spanish anyway, or their "version" of it. But yes, in all fairness, there is obviously way more Spanish spoken in EP than SA.

One of my friends is a teacher for the North-East ISD and he commented how a lot of the new arrival parents of students from Coahuila, Nuevo León and Central America find it much easier to just try Spanish-only with "Mexican-looking" locals than really strive to learn English. Juarenses may be the same way in El Paso. It doesn't bother me, but it's something to note when you compare the migration experiences of a family there compared to settling in, say, Middle America.

Last edited by aab7855; 04-30-2021 at 04:38 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-30-2021, 08:33 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA>Tijuana, BC>San Antonio, TX
5,167 posts, read 5,312,364 times
Reputation: 4930
Thx... for others my numbers are a pure "guestimates". The official numbers would be hard to come by.

I think in SA a Mexican American might be more likely to attempt to speak to a country side Mexican national/immigrant in Spanglish and vice/versa so they will get along just fine.....as opposed to a wealthy lighter skin Mexican from Monterrey who will forcibly speak in broken English to the Mex American with no Spanish to prove a point. Again, this is just my experience....experiences will vary.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2021, 12:40 PM
 
88 posts, read 66,128 times
Reputation: 134
I can't provide stats but I can say with great confidence El Paso is VERY bilingual. More than anywhere I have ever been in the US.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2021, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Irvine, California
156 posts, read 190,668 times
Reputation: 191
I'm not sure I'd call what El Pasoans speak "Spanish"...it's more like a proprietary blend of both languages.

I am a fluent, native-level Spanish speaker and it's definitely not a dialect that could be understood by the hispanophone world at large. I met a lot of people who could only speak Spanish with family members, which I thought was odd. Among family they speak it, but they go out into the street with their friends—even other Spanish speakers—and they never spoke the language outside the home, it was always English.

Seems like everyone I met there had a grandparent who spoke only Spanish and that was the primary use of it. When I showed them Spanish-language movies they insisted on English subtitles and none of them listened to any Spanish music or watched any Spanish-language TV except Sabado Gigante with their grandma lol

To say that El Paso is a "Spanish-speaking" town is kind of a stretch imo...your daily life is lived in entirely in English unless you have Spanish-speaking family...or you're waiting for your order number at Chico's Tacos.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2021, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
13,577 posts, read 8,528,247 times
Reputation: 8181
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildWestDude View Post
Bilingual could be nice unless it stops one from being employed while in the US!
That is a problem for some who are monolingual or speak another language other than Spanish.

English required should be in the job descriptions IMO.
Why would bilingual ability stop one from being employed? It's a plus in one's career, not a minus.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2021, 08:24 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
1,472 posts, read 2,442,535 times
Reputation: 1803
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Why would bilingual ability stop one from being employed? It's a plus in one's career, not a minus.
I think what the poster was trying to say is that while having a bilingual region could be a real plus, it's "wrong" to require bilingualism (if the candidate only speaks English) in order to get hired in said region.

I know this is an issue in Miami, but I'm not sure about El Paso. Probably depends on the job as well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2021, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
13,577 posts, read 8,528,247 times
Reputation: 8181
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
I think what the poster was trying to say is that while having a bilingual region could be a real plus, it's "wrong" to require bilingualism (if the candidate only speaks English) in order to get hired in said region.

I know this is an issue in Miami, but I'm not sure about El Paso. Probably depends on the job as well.
I think it depends on the job, and it's not wrong if it is a bona fide job requirement - example - if you work in Customs & Immigration at the border, or if you work for a business or agency that serves many people who speak Spanish. If you're in Honolulu, it's a plus to know Japanese - and I think most of the airport immigration and customs officials can speak it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2021, 05:37 PM
 
Location: City of North Las Vegas, NV
11,622 posts, read 8,429,202 times
Reputation: 3208
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Why would bilingual ability stop one from being employed? It's a plus in one's career, not a minus.
Bilingualism shouldn't stop you but also shouldn't be required. English should be the language of trade. In other words, if one is monolingual English speaking he should not be discriminated against if looking for a job something that does happens in El Paso.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > El Paso

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top