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Old 01-12-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,446 posts, read 16,133,530 times
Reputation: 6958

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
Greece got into the situation they are in because the government accumulated too much debt. This has nothing to do with the amount of hours worked per year.
The Greek are, apparently, working quite a bit. Now, if they all would pay their taxes...

Surprised France was able to hold onto the 35 work week for so long.
The 35 hour week has been a painful thorn in the butt of Western capitalists for a long time. It's no wonder that American businesses want to generate contempt for France.
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Old 01-12-2012, 06:38 PM
 
2,234 posts, read 5,465,136 times
Reputation: 2081
Default Nah...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
The 35 hour week has been a painful thorn in the butt of Western capitalists for a long time. It's no wonder that American businesses want to generate contempt for France.

France Drops 35-Hour Work Week - CBS News

Quote:
Most concede, however, that the original 35-hour workweek — introduced on a voluntary basis in 1998 and made compulsory two years later —has failed to create the promised millions of jobs.

A parliamentary committee chaired by conservative deputy Herve Novelli last year claimed the shorter workweek had cost the state upward of euro10 billion (US$13 billion) a year. It also disputed a labor ministry report that it had created 350,000 jobs in its first five years. Novelli welcomed Tuesday's vote, saying the 35-hour law had brought a "salary stagnation that is now difficult to emerge from."

The French International Investment Agency also says the 35-hour law was often cited by overseas executives as a reason not to operate in France.
Here, they talk about what they can learn from the "German model", the inflexibility for the job market, inflexibility that crippled the purchasing power etc.

Relation de travail et compromis social : les leçons du modèle allemand


They don't have a higher output per hour that makes up for the hours missing. Basically, they just lowered their economic output. While I am a liberal, I think a 35 hour work week law is a stupid idea. I don't think a law should limit it to 35. 40 is perfectly fine, and it's more competitive. Especially when your unemployment rate is hoovering around 10%.
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Saint Maur des Fosses - France
120 posts, read 166,602 times
Reputation: 89
Don't mistaken about French refusing to speak English, we don't mean to be rude, haughty or anything like that, most of us are just ashamed of our accent and scared not to be understood.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:51 PM
 
Location: The Netherlands
2,920 posts, read 5,220,476 times
Reputation: 3425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivieroma View Post
Don't mistaken about French refusing to speak English, we don't mean to be rude, haughty or anything like that, most of us are just ashamed of our accent and scared not to be understood.
I find it funny that you can go to most countries in the world where people barely speak English and people are fine with it, but when it's the French all of a sudden it's because they "refuse" it or are too "arrogant" for it Why aren't people complaining about Spain or Italy or Latin America? I doubt people there speak English better than the French do.
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Old 01-13-2012, 04:06 PM
 
690 posts, read 1,196,926 times
Reputation: 472
The french dont like old buildings. Or at least the english think they dont, so the english go and buy massive old chateaux's as holiday homes because the french prefer to live in new places.

Also they dont like paying road tolls. Their toll roads are empty because they wont pay.
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:58 PM
 
1,264 posts, read 3,848,981 times
Reputation: 798
Quote:
Originally Posted by LondonAreaWeatherSummary View Post
The french dont like old buildings. Or at least the english think they dont, so the english go and buy massive old chateaux's as holiday homes because the french prefer to live in new places.

Also they dont like paying road tolls. Their toll roads are empty because they wont pay.
France is known for their expertise in restoration of heritage buildings. In fact, they have 5-year training program in "Master Conservation-Restauration des Biens Culturel" and others.

Selling off old chateaux has more to do with pecuniary concerns than taste.
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Old 01-13-2012, 08:11 PM
 
6,334 posts, read 11,495,469 times
Reputation: 6304
J'aime La France, especially the cute villages. It is my fondest dream to go walking from village to village on a Grande Randonee. Any suggestions which ones to take to get the most scenery and villages without too much trekking through big scale farms and industrial zones? A chambre de hote, hotel, or gite d'etape every 10-20 KM would be much appreciated. Is this possible?
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Old 01-13-2012, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Earth
24,620 posts, read 28,189,305 times
Reputation: 11416
Quote:
Originally Posted by LondonAreaWeatherSummary View Post
The french dont like old buildings. Or at least the english think they dont, so the english go and buy massive old chateaux's as holiday homes because the french prefer to live in new places.

Also they dont like paying road tolls. Their toll roads are empty because they wont pay.
Not my experience.
At all.
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Old 01-14-2012, 05:02 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
11,154 posts, read 29,156,719 times
Reputation: 5479
What do I think about france..while as of late I been thinking you need to cut your debt levels ASAP because every Economist in Canada is watching your next move after the S&P credit downgrade from AAA to AA+..

Your economy is way to huge to bailout that the best thing we are hoping for is you and Germany kick greece out of the euro and let them default to save your own country and only keep the strong economic heavy hitters in the euro zone.

Anyways best of luck and Frnace can not default and either can germany or the US and Canada will also be in trouble...Remember we are all in this together and failure is not an option and Canada will try to get our countries economy in order as best we can also.
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Old 01-14-2012, 05:06 AM
 
6,334 posts, read 11,495,469 times
Reputation: 6304
It's selfish, but I'm glad to see the Euro slide as that make a visit more affordable.
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