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Old 02-22-2014, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Paris
8,199 posts, read 8,120,263 times
Reputation: 3530

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Quote:
Originally Posted by amaroW View Post
extra day off (RTT) in France:
if you work more than 35 hours a week, the rest it is extra day off (free days or paid days)
extra day off in Germany:
you have to work more than 39hours...it is a BIG BIG BIG difference
I assume the OP would be a "cadre". Be it in France, Germany or planet Mars, she'll stay at the office till the work is done. Looks like Germans work less hours on average anyway:
Average annual hours actually worked per worker

I've briefly worked in Germany and France and know people who have done the same. It's more frowned upon to leave early in France than it is in Germany. Btw who takes 2 hours to eat? Between 30 minutes and one hour is the norm in my experience. Most people would rather leave earlier than take such a long lunch break.

Last edited by Rozenn; 02-22-2014 at 01:20 PM..
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:42 PM
 
821 posts, read 872,394 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
I assume the OP would be a "cadre". Be it in France, Germany or planet Mars, she'll stay at the office till the work is done. Looks like Germans work less hours on average anyway:
Average annual hours actually worked per worker

I've briefly worked in Germany and France and know people who have done the same. It's more frowned upon to leave early in France than it is in Germany. Btw who takes 2 hours to eat? Between 30 minutes and one hour is the norm in my experience. Most people would rather leave earlier than take such a long lunch break.

LOL ofcourse Germans work less hours on average because 20% are on part time job!

German worker contract "39h"
French worker contract "35h" (so like many French who work 39 or 40h, you have 30 extra days off more than Germans..)

But in Germany many people also have 10hours contracts that is why unemployment rate is low and that is why on average they work less than French.......

and here again, the fact they work less on average than French, unemployment rate is lower...

Not really hard to understand...


PS: if you want to compare two same jobs between France and Germany
you need to be paid 30%/47,23% more in Germany to have the same (real) income.
-20% regarding the difference between Gross and net
-10%/27,23% regarding the 30 extra days off (you can ask to have your days off paid) and regarding your retirement!
And it is also the reason why we are less competitive than Germans but we don't want to change it just for being more competitive lol.
The only reason which could be in favor of Germany is that the cost of living is higher in France.
But the final result is that French become richer and Germans poorer.
Just take a look at the patrimony per adult (median and average) and the % of people under the poverty line...
The average patrimony in France is 429 000 euros, the highest in the world after some countries like Switzerland.
Le patrimoine moyen net des Français est de 380.000 euros - Challenges

I am specializing in that kind of comparison at the French central bank so I know it by heart

Last edited by amaroW; 02-22-2014 at 02:22 PM..
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:30 PM
 
821 posts, read 872,394 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
As I said, amaroW is a French propagandist. He lives in the naive belief that France is some sort of shining utopia of how a country is supposed to be (because, you know, people there choose to be unemployed because being unemployed is better than being in employment - that is the ideal scenario! Viva la France). It speaks volumes that everyone else is trying so hard to knock some sense into this bonehead - and nobody is actually in agreement with the drivel he is coming out with.

I've also responded to his previous posts on other threads (identical to the above one), correcting him on the sh*t he posts about the UK economy (why was the UK even involved?!) and zero-hour contracts (which make up a fraction of UK jobs, btw), but he still seems to believe what he is posting. Ignorance is bliss.
The most incredible things about economy and economies are often the real ones. The reality is always hard to accept and I can understand your point.
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Old 02-23-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Paris
8,199 posts, read 8,120,263 times
Reputation: 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by amaroW View Post
LOL ofcourse Germans work less hours on average because 20% are on part time job!

German worker contract "39h"
French worker contract "35h" (so like many French who work 39 or 40h, you have 30 extra days off more than Germans..)

But in Germany many people also have 10hours contracts that is why unemployment rate is low and that is why on average they work less than French.......

and here again, the fact they work less on average than French, unemployment rate is lower...

Not really hard to understand...
Fair enough.

Here are the stats for full-time jobs only (select full-time right of "job type"):
Average usual weekly hours worked on the main job

Apparently 41 hours per week in both countries. Since workers work less hours in France (mandatory 35h), wouldn't "cadres" work longer hours than in Germany so it evens out? It's been my experience.
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Old 02-24-2014, 02:48 AM
 
821 posts, read 872,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
Fair enough.

Here are the stats for full-time jobs only (select full-time right of "job type"):
Average usual weekly hours worked on the main job

Apparently 41 hours per week in both countries. Since workers work less hours in France (mandatory 35h), wouldn't "cadres" work longer hours than in Germany so it evens out? It's been my experience.
Yes, the "cadres" work more hours in France (40/42h) vs 39 hours in Germany but in France they are on 35h or 37h hours contract therefore they can ask for 26/30 more extra days off.

German contract 39h and they work 39h
French contract 35h and they work more than 40hours (so 5h per week ==> paid or for vacations).
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Old 02-24-2014, 02:15 PM
 
2,257 posts, read 5,230,694 times
Reputation: 2040
Default no sources...made up yourself?

All this nice talk and yet the Titanic still sank.

But I'm gonna stop feeding the troll.
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Old 02-24-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 27,733,180 times
Reputation: 8789
Quote:
Originally Posted by amaroW View Post
I live and work in France so I can tell you better than you though.
I live in and work in the UK - do not lecture me about the realities of the UK labour force or the state of the UK economy.

France: the only country in the world where an 11% unemployment rate is good, and being unemployed is preferable to working - apparently. Super efficiency indeed.

Last edited by dunno what to put here; 02-24-2014 at 02:34 PM..
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Old 02-25-2014, 03:29 AM
 
821 posts, read 872,394 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I live in and work in the UK - do not lecture me about the realities of the UK labour force or the state of the UK economy.

France: the only country in the world where an 11% unemployment rate is good, and being unemployed is preferable to working - apparently. Super efficiency indeed.

Yes it is efficient because people who don't work contribute to growth in France and are not victim of austerity. Consumer spendings is increasing as opposed to other countries.
We don't have inflation, our income are also increasing.
Germany incomes -0.2% in 2013. Not necessary to speak about inflation and incomes in UK...Workers in Uk and Germany become poorer each year.
The economy is to serve the people, not the people to serve the economy. In Germany the people serve the economy!
Many Nobel Prize like Paul Krugmann or popular economists like Manfred Max-Neef mention it quite often.
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Old 02-25-2014, 07:53 AM
 
2,257 posts, read 5,230,694 times
Reputation: 2040
Default too much wine?

BBC News - Which country has the highest tax rate?
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Old 02-25-2014, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 27,733,180 times
Reputation: 8789
Quote:
Originally Posted by amaroW View Post
Yes it is efficient because people who don't work contribute to growth in France and are not victim of austerity. Consumer spendings is increasing as opposed to other countries.
We don't have inflation, our income are also increasing.
Germany incomes -0.2% in 2013. Not necessary to speak about inflation and incomes in UK...Workers in Uk and Germany become poorer each year.
The economy is to serve the people, not the people to serve the economy. In Germany the people serve the economy!
Many Nobel Prize like Paul Krugmann or popular economists like Manfred Max-Neef mention it quite often.
Incomes in the UK are falling because inflation is higher than wage growth. This is not a permanent situation, and will probably change this year as inflation continues to fall (1.9% currently) and wage growth accelerates. Indeed, wages are set to grow in real terms this year for the first time in years, so don't get ahead of yourself - the squeeze on the average Brits' finances will end soon enough, and we'll have a growing economy, low unemployment and falling prices/rising incomes. Things have taken a while to get going, and we were in the doldrums until the past year or so, but we're really taking off now, and the situation is pretty good overall. We still have a few structural problems to attend to, such as the imbalance between between exports, imports and our over-dependence on finance, but those problems exist in all countries to varying degrees.

Too little inflation is not necessarily good either, and deflation is not a desirable situation (ask Greece). As long as inflation remains below wage growth, it isn't a big deal, and it's better to have some inflation than to have deflation.

I don't know enough about the German economy to make an accurate comment. I will leave the Germans to do their part.
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