U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-17-2014, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Macao
16,079 posts, read 37,991,136 times
Reputation: 9774

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbiePoster View Post
The US allows much more freedom of expression.
Quote:
Originally Posted by viribusunitis View Post
I read that quite a lot, still don't get it.
Yeah, I don't get that one either. It's one of those things Americans continually perpetuate, leftover of Cold War propaganda politics, that doesn't apply much at all outside of that very narrow context.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-17-2014, 01:52 PM
 
18,313 posts, read 15,373,856 times
Reputation: 8040
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbiePoster View Post
It sounds like the OP hasn't seen the US much, and is idealizing Europe. There def are places in Europe that are duller than a lot of parts of the US. Some countries in Europe are very conformist, too. The US allows much more freedom of expression. There are pluses and minuses on both sides of the pond.
Yeah, provided you have something left to "express"
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,698 posts, read 10,481,314 times
Reputation: 11299
Sure, for quaintness and history you can't beat the Old World. For cuisine, you can't beat Europe, especially France and Italy.

And for natural beauty, well, beauty is found world-wide and the U.S. and Canada have their fair share.

Tour the national parks in Canada and the U.S., and you'll see beauty that's awe-inspiring.

But I can sure understnd the cultural shock of re-entering sprawling Atlanta after the quaintness and cuisine of France.

We in the U.S. live in such a car culture. Much of Europe, in the smaller towns and villages, is more of a walking culture. Tiny, ancient roads make sure of that. It's just more...human...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Holland
824 posts, read 1,112,858 times
Reputation: 1342
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
We in the U.S. live in such a car culture. Much of Europe, in the smaller towns and villages, is more of a walking culture. Tiny, ancient roads make sure of that. It's just more...human...
Really? Small villages and towns sound great, until you live there. If Americans love it so much, why don't they build them? It seems to me that based on what you and the OP wrote here, there must be a huge market for it. But they are not being built, Americans prefer the big houses, the big cities. So I conclude that the nice small quaint towns are great to look at as a tourist, but less so to build, buy and live in.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Macao
16,079 posts, read 37,991,136 times
Reputation: 9774
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyAndRugby View Post
Really? Small villages and towns sound great, until you live there. If Americans love it so much, why don't they build them? It seems to me that based on what you and the OP wrote here, there must be a huge market for it. But they are not being built, Americans prefer the big houses, the big cities. So I conclude that the nice small quaint towns are great to look at as a tourist, but less so to build, buy and live in.
Actually, there are a ton of quaint small towns all across the United States.

But, a lot of these Americans who live in American suburbs, are completely unaware of their existence as well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 02:04 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
85,933 posts, read 79,112,132 times
Reputation: 88170
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyAndRugby View Post
Really? Small villages and towns sound great, until you live there. If Americans love it so much, why don't they build them? It seems to me that based on what you and the OP wrote here, there must be a huge market for it. But they are not being built, Americans prefer the big houses, the big cities. So I conclude that the nice small quaint towns are great to look at as a tourist, but less so to build, buy and live in.
Not necessarily. California is full of small towns that are very popular, for example. New Mexico, as well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Holland
824 posts, read 1,112,858 times
Reputation: 1342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Not necessarily. California is full of small towns that are very popular, for example. New Mexico, as well.
That may be true, but they are still much larger in terms of geographical size compared to those "nice quaint acient European towns". With wider roads, larger houses and so on.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 03:05 PM
Status: "Tell your loved ones you love them." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
54,425 posts, read 42,603,601 times
Reputation: 75809
I have traveled all over Europe and the US. Both regions of this world have their share of natural and man made beauty. I like parts of both of them, and dislike parts of both of them.

I enjoy visiting Europe but I'm always glad to come home to Texas. And I hope that Europeans visiting the US feel the same way when they go home.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 05:36 PM
 
4,035 posts, read 4,130,539 times
Reputation: 5325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Yeah, I don't get that one either. It's one of those things Americans continually perpetuate, leftover of Cold War propaganda politics, that doesn't apply much at all outside of that very narrow context.
I'm too young for the Cold War to cross my mind, lol. I was thinking more of some of the Germanic cultures, where conformity is important, and young people don't feel free to cut loose and have crazy fun.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2014, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,698 posts, read 10,481,314 times
Reputation: 11299
[quote=HockeyAndRugby;36122605]Really? Small villages and towns sound great, until you live there. If Americans love it so much, why don't they build them? It seems to me that based on what you and the OP wrote here, there must be a huge market for it. But they are not being built, Americans prefer the big houses, the big cities. So I conclude that the nice

Actually, if you follow trends (as I do for my work), a huge trend is building "Walkable Communities" and transit communties where cars are parked on the edge or behind houses and citizens can walk or bike (and in some cases, ride an electric golf cart) to all the amenities.

Seems many of us DO want out of our cars. Especially those who live in large cities and have long commutes. When we come home at the end of the day, we don't want to get back in our cars and fight for parking spaces to go out to grocery shop, eat out, go to entertainment venues...

So you see, many do want walkable areas and "walkable communties" are big news in modern urban design. Rails to Trails projects are other big news in towns and cities where people can cycle for recreation and in some cases to work.

With the cost of gasoline ever rising and roads clogged, it makes sense to get us out of our cars and into less pricey and polluting commuting and transportation modes.

Meanwhile we have Paris and New York-- two walkable cities with great public transporation. It's a liability to own a car in those two cities.

Another huge trend is smaller homes and downsizing. Google "tiny houses" to see what's wildly popular. Why do you think Americans want huge houses? That's yesterday's news. We're all going broke (except for the top 2% tier)--we cannot afford to maintain, heat, cool and furnish those McMansions any more.

Last edited by LittleDolphin; 08-17-2014 at 05:53 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:28 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top