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Old 08-17-2014, 10:47 AM
 
1,692 posts, read 1,753,164 times
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Do Europeans share this view with me?

If I took an average piece of country in any nation in Europe and stacked it next to the US/Canada equivalent, I find the US one comes in very boring and dull-looking
Most depressing for charm anyone would tell you is a flight from Paris back to Atlanta and then switching from the more charming Air France carrier to connecting to a plain ole mediocre Delta flight with crowded ugly airport lines and mediocred American average-ism
The loss of the long European summer days and comfy temperatures and millennia old landscapes

To a land filled with Walmarts and quizno and Starbucks and humid 90-degree stagnant air and nothing of Any real charm

Most architecturally impressive for the US I find to be the towns around Boston Harbor and Newport Rhode Island, but even those wane in impression next to real harbor towns in Scotland, Ireland, England

I find very little resemblance ANYWHERE in US to real Dutch, Belgian country and architecture

Very mild resemblance between some Midwest towns and Germany,

Perhaps a touch of Barcelona and Nice in San Francisco

Scenic wise the most impressive unmatched US scenery would be the red rocks of the Colorado River in Desert Southwest and Zion national park

But it takes but one European town to capture the charm unfounded in 90% of the US
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Old 08-17-2014, 10:49 AM
 
1,692 posts, read 1,753,164 times
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Maybe it can be argued that some of New England beats the charm in England when it comes to autumn foliage
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
852 posts, read 863,836 times
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It's all about personal preferences. Myself, I enjoy each place I visit for its uniqueness and not for how much it resembles Europe. If the whole world would be like Europe -a beautiful continent nonetheless- it'll be a really boring world.
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:23 AM
 
1,350 posts, read 2,575,794 times
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You're mostly correct. This was observed as far back as the 1970s in an editorial in the New York Times, no less.

"Because the air conditioner, the airplane and television have smoothed out harsh differences in climate, nearly abolished distance and homogenized popular taste, Americans are become much less regionally diverse.”

http://www.salon.com/chromeo/article...odern_america/

That, and the fact that this is by far the most corporation-dominated society on the planet means that the sameness you've observed all over the US was inevitable.

Although the same forces were at work in Europe, I suspect the fact that European cultures are so much older and the people have such pride in their own cultures that they managed to prevent this from happening as quickly as it did in the US. They're also less capitalistic so that might have played a role. I'll submit, though, that there might well have been many other things responsible...
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
84,446 posts, read 77,616,808 times
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Dude, to what extent do you think that simply the novelty of Europe to your experience makes the difference? Causing everything old and familiar to seem stale? There are places in the US where Wal-Mart isn't allowed, and the most popular coffee shop hangouts are locally-owned. Maybe that's why you like San Francisco (also check out Berkeley, and the small towns in Marin County). For uniqueness, check out Santa Fe, NM, with its historic adobe-style architecture, art galleries, and local Native American ceremonies.

Europe is great, but so is the US. If you know where to look, there's a lot in the US to fascinate the visitor. Maybe you should move away from Atlanta, and try something new. The West coast doesn't have 90-degree humid, stagnant air.

Just some food for thought.
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,010 posts, read 37,648,417 times
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Aren't there enough threads about the U.S. in the Europe forum already?
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Old 08-17-2014, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Macao
16,010 posts, read 37,648,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricS39 View Post
Do Europeans share this view with me?

If I took an average piece of country in any nation in Europe and stacked it next to the US/Canada equivalent, I find the US one comes in very boring and dull-looking
Most depressing for charm anyone would tell you is a flight from Paris back to Atlanta and then switching from the more charming Air France carrier to connecting to a plain ole mediocre Delta flight with crowded ugly airport lines and mediocred American average-ism
The loss of the long European summer days and comfy temperatures and millennia old landscapes

To a land filled with Walmarts and quizno and Starbucks and humid 90-degree stagnant air and nothing of Any real charm

Most architecturally impressive for the US I find to be the towns around Boston Harbor and Newport Rhode Island, but even those wane in impression next to real harbor towns in Scotland, Ireland, England

I find very little resemblance ANYWHERE in US to real Dutch, Belgian country and architecture

Very mild resemblance between some Midwest towns and Germany,

Perhaps a touch of Barcelona and Nice in San Francisco

Scenic wise the most impressive unmatched US scenery would be the red rocks of the Colorado River in Desert Southwest and Zion national park

But it takes but one European town to capture the charm unfounded in 90% of the US
It sounds like you've only lived your life in an Atlanta suburb....the U.S. doesn't all look like that, nor is it all hot and humid uniformly across the entire country.

You can go to the Grand Canyon, Sequoia, New Orleans, San Francisco, Portland, Boston, New York City, Alaska, Hawaii, Miami, on and on and on and on....way too many to list...none of which are dull and boring.

Europe is great, the U.S. is great, Asia is great, Africa is great. It's just a matter of going out to see it, so you know that.
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Old 08-17-2014, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Holland
824 posts, read 1,105,168 times
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I have a hard time to grasp what the OP is trying to say. The great lakes of Michigan, we don't have those in Europe. We have lakes, lots of them in Scandinavia, but none as big as those between Canada and the US. Grand Canyon, we don't have that in Holland. Manhattan, not even London is like it.

What exactly is the point of reference? Dutch town centres are seeing an increasing amount of shops being the same as in every other town, you'll find the same shops everywhere.

Or is the OP talking about architecture? Well, that'll happen when something is referred to as the Old World. Small closely confined cities are very quaint, but there is a lot to be said for the size of the towns in de US.
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Old 08-17-2014, 12:58 PM
 
4,035 posts, read 4,088,883 times
Reputation: 5323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
It sounds like you've only lived your life in an Atlanta suburb....the U.S. doesn't all look like that, nor is it all hot and humid uniformly across the entire country.

You can go to the Grand Canyon, Sequoia, New Orleans, San Francisco, Portland, Boston, New York City, Alaska, Hawaii, Miami, on and on and on and on....way too many to list...none of which are dull and boring.

Europe is great, the U.S. is great, Asia is great, Africa is great. It's just a matter of going out to see it, so you know that.
It sounds like the OP hasn't seen the US much, and is idealizing Europe. There def are places in Europe that are duller than a lot of parts of the US. Some countries in Europe are very conformist, too. The US allows much more freedom of expression. There are pluses and minuses on both sides of the pond.
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Old 08-17-2014, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong / Vienna
4,557 posts, read 5,403,317 times
Reputation: 3942
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbiePoster View Post
It sounds like the OP hasn't seen the US much, and is idealizing Europe. There def are places in Europe that are duller than a lot of parts of the US. Some countries in Europe are very conformist, too. The US allows much more freedom of expression. There are pluses and minuses on both sides of the pond.
I read that quite a lot, still don't get it.
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