Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which of these European languages do you think is most likely to become extinct?
Gaeilge 6 35.29%
Malti 5 29.41%
Føroyskt 6 35.29%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-15-2017, 07:43 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,635 posts, read 16,707,457 times
Reputation: 5248

Advertisements

1. Irish language (Gaeilge)

According to Wiki has 140,000 native speakers and over 1.7 million second language speakers of varying degrees of proficiency. Official language of the Republic of Ireland alongside English and an official language of the European Union. As recent as the 19th century, many people in Ireland still spoke the language but it has largely been supplanted by English by most in Ireland.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_language


2. Maltese language (Malti)

According to Wiki has 520,000 native speakers and few second language learners. It is an official language in Malta alongside English and an official language of the European Union. Almost everyone in Malta today is bilingual with English with only a few monolinguals left. Maltese hasn't been an official language for most of Malta's history and only used as a vernacular language alongside first Italian and then English. It became co-official with English when Malta gained independence in 1964.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltese_language


3. Faroese language (Føroyskt)

According to Wiki has 66,000 native speakers and few second language learners. It is an official language in the Faroe Islands alongside Danish. Faroese has the fewest native speakers among these languages and is spoken primarily in a place that is not an independent country. It is still a territory in the Kingdom of Denmark albeit with much devolved powers due to home rule. Faroese was not even allowed in institutions for over three hundred years in favour of Danish starting in 1536 which changed after home rule. Today is not the case but still Danish is a language studied in school. English is also very widely spoken among the Faroese.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroese_language


If we look at the number of wiki entries today in each language, we can see which language has the most articles. It is certainly not a scientific method of looking at language vitality but it is interesting nonetheless.

Irish - 39,411
Maltese - 3,190
Faroese - 12,455

So which of these have the worst possible future and may become extinct and why? I like to hear what people think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-15-2017, 08:02 PM
 
3,326 posts, read 2,620,696 times
Reputation: 629
Maltese no doubt.

Nowadays the 1st economic sector from Malta is the tourism, and they adopted English as their official language when they were belonging to the British Empire, the biggest prevalence of tourists in Malta come from English speaking countries... and also it has lots and lots of foreign immigrants (counting British expats) which only speak English. In some decades the maltese language will be ko. And it's a pity...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Minsk, Belarus
667 posts, read 940,673 times
Reputation: 585
I think Maltese is much more alive than Gaelic...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 04:08 AM
 
Location: Estonia
1,704 posts, read 1,838,322 times
Reputation: 2293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Junter View Post
Maltese no doubt.

Nowadays the 1st economic sector from Malta is the tourism, and they adopted English as their official language when they were belonging to the British Empire, the biggest prevalence of tourists in Malta come from English speaking countries... and also it has lots and lots of foreign immigrants (counting British expats) which only speak English. In some decades the maltese language will be ko. And it's a pity...
I think you're wrong. Having tourists from mainly English speaking countries doesn't equate to not learning the official language anymore. And since Maltese is the preferred language over English in the EU, it's really not gonna happen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,128 posts, read 24,813,132 times
Reputation: 11103
Gaelic, because it's the only language which is not a integral part of the national identity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 09:25 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,635 posts, read 16,707,457 times
Reputation: 5248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Gaelic, because it's the only language which is not a integral part of the national identity.
How is it not part of the national identity? Irish schoolchildren learn Irish as a subject in school even if few are very proficient. If it wasn't part of the national identity, it would not be part of the curriculum at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,128 posts, read 24,813,132 times
Reputation: 11103
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
How is it not part of the national identity? Irish schoolchildren learn Irish as a subject in school even if few are very proficient. If it wasn't part of the national identity, it would not be part of the curriculum at all.
It's a part, but not an integral part. Most people speak English at home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 10:28 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,635 posts, read 16,707,457 times
Reputation: 5248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
It's a part, but not an integral part. Most people speak English at home.
True. I would be curious to know how many young Maltese speak English at home seeing that English is one of the official languages of Malta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 10:54 AM
 
6,112 posts, read 3,925,140 times
Reputation: 2243
90% of the Faroe Islands speak Føroyskt as their first language, the next most common first language is Danish, at just 3.1%. So Føroyskt is no danger, and doesn't really belong on this kind of list.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langua...#Faroe_Islands
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2017, 11:01 AM
 
6,112 posts, read 3,925,140 times
Reputation: 2243
The problem for Maltese is not simply survival, but also preserving its identity. It's so heavily influenced by English that currently up to 20% of the vocabulary is estimated to have been derived from English. Heavy word borrowing can chnage a language beyond recognition, just look at Old-English before it began to borrow heavily from Norman French, it was basically a different language, more closely related to German than it is to modern English.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top