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Old 04-01-2010, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
321 posts, read 962,449 times
Reputation: 404

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I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Mauritius, the only country in the world where French is overtaking English as the national language (undoubtedly due to the proximity of Réunion).
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Old 10-12-2010, 10:24 PM
 
75 posts, read 91,672 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

However, the myth about Louisiana being reasonably French persists in the francophone world especially.
Perhaps one reason is because the best-known Cajun, Zachary Richard, who is a star in both French-speaking
Canada and Europe, speaks French fluently.

So people imagine that all Cajuns are like him.
(Raises hand, blushes)

J'avoue, j'avoue...
No seriously I knew the way he spoke was closer to "New-Brunswick french"
albeit the typical Cajun's mix of frenglish/creole was rather... incomprehensible? to the untrained ear I mean.

Still I started searching for Cajun forums; the two I found were 99% english, and pretty much deserted anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Cajun French is a pretty small dialect these days. Looking it up it seems to have around 17,000-19,000 speakers, many of them elderly.
Now I know why.

This is a C-Data thread about the french-speaking Cajuns in Louisiana

I guess only the music can keep "Cadien" alive for a couple more decades. Music can, while CODOFIL is trying...


Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
what do the Quebecois think of France and French people
Personally I don't care much about the French because they're not precious, as weird as it sounds.
There are millions of 'em, they're not likely to go extinct any soon. But -
I'd be listening if the topic was France's endangered provincial dialects.


I'm only glad I'll be long gone by the time le joual disappears
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Old 10-13-2010, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,929 posts, read 38,245,301 times
Reputation: 11679
Quote:
Originally Posted by minidelle View Post
I'm only glad I'll be long gone by the time le joual disappears
While joual is not in danger of disappearing entirely, many of its terms are fading into disuse, and being replaced with more standard international French terms.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:38 PM
 
75 posts, read 91,672 times
Reputation: 85
Je l'sais ben. Did you have specific ones in mind?

Presently I can only think of "la champlure". Seems like robinets are winning, ha
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Old 10-13-2010, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,929 posts, read 38,245,301 times
Reputation: 11679
Quote:
Originally Posted by minidelle View Post
Je l'sais ben. Did you have specific ones in mind?

Presently I can only think of "la champlure". Seems like robinets are winning, ha
I have francophone kids growing up in Quebec and I am not sure they know what a champlure is. They say robinet. They and their friends tend to use soutien-gorge as well instead of brassière for a bra.

Zing for sink is completely gone, as is bâdrer for bother. They would never say litte for lit or nuitte for nuit.

Assir appears to be losing the battle with asseoir (to sit). They never use char for car, and generally say voiture or auto instead.

But some joual words are still very commonly used by people of all social classes and origins in Quebec: pantoute (pas du tout / not at all), and the fantastically versatile verb pogner (get, catch, grab, hook, obtain, win, seduce, land).
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Old 10-14-2010, 05:17 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 2,248,213 times
Reputation: 840
Zachary Richard?


His name used to be Ralph back in High School.
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:04 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,774 posts, read 26,632,462 times
Reputation: 6790
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerouac2 View Post
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Mauritius, the only country in the world where French is overtaking English as the national language (undoubtedly due to the proximity of Réunion).
This is from long time back, but I mentioned Mauritius in a list on post 21.
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Old 10-16-2010, 11:45 AM
 
75 posts, read 91,672 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

Zing for sink is completely gone, as is bâdrer for bother.
That's a good one. It ain't definitely gone since my father and his boomer pals still use it.

My grand-father once told me how his parents said Nordà and Sudà (North-East, South-East)


I also remembered two TV series where I could find a bunch of obsolete terms:
"Un Homme et son Péché" and "Le Temps d'une Paix"
("A Man and his Sin" ................ "A Time of Peace")

One of my favorites is manquablement (doubtless) - a popular phrase-starter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

They never use char for car, and generally say voiture or auto instead.
I'm not too worried about char, I'm positive it'll be one of the last soldier standing ...
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Old 10-21-2010, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,929 posts, read 38,245,301 times
Reputation: 11679
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacalaitWhisperer View Post
Zachary Richard?


His name used to be Ralph back in High School.
Just to illustrate how big a star Zachary is in Quebec, he just had a stroke down in Louisiana. It made the national news up here today. I heard about
it while having breakfast this morning.

Thankfully, it looks like he will be OK.
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Old 10-23-2010, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,373 posts, read 3,138,023 times
Reputation: 573
is there a lot of French-world cross-culture?
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