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Old 12-18-2009, 01:51 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
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I saw a post in the Canada sub-forum where someone asked what do the Quebecois think of France and French people, and it got me thinking, how do people in France see the rest of the Francophone world, and vice versa? Are there any contentious issues or stereotypes that are widely held? Do people in the "colonized" world see France as a good, bad, indifferent thing, or just something that happened in distant history?

Of particular interest to me (though all points are welcome) are how the Quebecois, the Cajun, and French people see each other. Opinions from former colonies including Vietnam, NW and central Africa including Algeria, the Carribean, and who can forget French Guiana are welcome too.
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Old 12-20-2009, 09:10 AM
 
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I'm a French guy (from Paris) and to tell the truth, the only francophone countries that interest me (but then it's my personal tastes) in the francophone world ara the French speaking part of Belgium (Wallonie), the French-speaking part of Switzerland (Romandie), Quebec and the Maritimes.
I don't care either for the tropical French oversea teritories since most of their populations are racist towards us, we are nicknamed zoreilles (a n-word).
All high cultured, interesting places, more civilized (my opinion at least) than France itself.
The "francophone" countries of Africa (which are not only French speaking since they have their national languages dubbed langues vernaculaires that are becoming more and more important since they are independent, like Arabic, Tamazight (Berber), Wolof, etc.) are very, very different from the rest of francophonia and unfortunately still very primitive and underdeveloped (Niger is the poorest country in the world).
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Old 12-20-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Sudcaroland
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I'm French and I must say I'm delighted to know my native tongue is spoken in many other countries in the world.
Apart from this, no special feeling, I don't love them more than the others, but I don't hate them either.
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Old 01-19-2010, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Francophones from other countries (be they European, African or Middle Eastern) are generally well-regarded in Quebec because they are deemed to be "easier to integrate" into Quebec society.

Keep in mind that a significant proportion of immigrants that come to Quebec, in spite of free language classes and other measures, end up using English rather than French in their new lives here. (Almost everything in Quebec is viewed through the prism of the language issue.)

Haitians in particular are very much seen as "part of the family" in Quebec, and the recent tragedy in Haiti has led to a huge outpouring of support here. Our all-news channels have been all-Haiti for the past week, and even regular TV and radio stations have been interrupting their regular programming with updates on Haiti.

Fundraising for Haiti is all over the place, from the media, supermarkets, schools, colleges, restaurants, telethons, etc.
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Old 01-19-2010, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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I forgot to mention that judging from what I hear from immigrants from poorer francophone countries, Quebec has in recent years emerged as a/the prime destination for francophone immigration.

I know of many people from Lebanon, Algeria, Cameroon, Congo, Senegal, Mauritius, etc. who have moved here after initially immigrating to France. But I know of almost no one who has moved to France after initially immigrating to Quebec (in spite of the fact that France has much better weather).

There seems to be a perception on the part of many immigrants that France (and Europe in general) is increasingly hostile towards immigrants.

Now I am not saying that this perception is accurate - just that it is out there and seems quite strong.

If I look at France I nonetheless see many immigrants or children of immigrants that have been very successful there, starting with the president himself (though he is still of European descent). There are also many other successful people in France who are of non-European origin, and not just in sports and entertainment (sectors traditionally more open to minorities), but also government ministers like Rachida Dati and Rama Yade.
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Old 01-19-2010, 04:48 PM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
Of particular interest to me (though all points are welcome) are how the Quebecois, the Cajun, and French people see each other. Opinions from former colonies including Vietnam, NW and central Africa including Algeria, the Carribean, and who can forget French Guiana are welcome too.
I know Louisiana is often considered part of the Francosphere, but it's not quite to the extent as Quebec and other countries. I still find it kinda of funny, though, to include Cajuns in this question. The stereotype that most Americans hold of Cajuns is that they are simply whitetrash rednecks with French names, so what do you think the French are gonna think of them?
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Old 01-19-2010, 06:46 PM
 
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Most of Louisiana is NOT francophonie!!! Most of Louisiana is English-speaking where no French is heard. You have to go out into the small towns in southwestern Louisiana (the swamps) to find towns were a significant minority still speaks Cajan...but that's it.

Note: There are more Americans of French or French Canadian descent in New Hampshire, where almost a quarter claim that as their heritage. However, French is spoken by a small minority of the people in that state as well.
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Old 01-19-2010, 06:48 PM
 
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By the way...I heard from my French Canadian friend that Quebecois see themselves as Quebecois NOT French. He told me they felt the French abandoned them centuries ago. Hence, a new identity was born that was rooted in France but unique...almost like how Canada and the USA are rooted in the UK but developed a unique and separate culture over time.
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Old 01-19-2010, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
Most of Louisiana is NOT francophonie!!! Most of Louisiana is English-speaking where no French is heard. You have to go out into the small towns in southwestern Louisiana (the swamps) to find towns were a significant minority still speaks Cajan...but that's it.

Note: There are more Americans of French or French Canadian descent in New Hampshire, where almost a quarter claim that as their heritage. However, French is spoken by a small minority of the people in that state as well.
I totally agree. It's such a stereotype. There's no french is LA. I don't even think it's a "significant manority". Probably have some French livingt there in LA, but I don't think that counts
According the the last census, the largest group was people of german ancestry. I know lots of people think you still got some german speaking people in some little towns in Texas, but I also think that's not true. Might have been true 50 years ago, and that stereotype just got carried over.
Dunno.
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Old 01-20-2010, 01:11 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
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Cajun French is a pretty small dialect these days. Looking it up it seems to have around 17,000-19,000 speakers, many of them elderly.

Ethnologue report for language code: frc

Now if you include all forms of French then it's around 3% of Louisianans. In Louisiana Cajun specifically ends up below Vietnamese at .46%.

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