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Old 11-20-2013, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,915 posts, read 61,344,286 times
Reputation: 55134

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Bessie and Mamie are very old names both were my Grandmothers' names. Although I loved my grandmothers, well the names , hmmm.....
Bessie is an old-fashioned nickname for Elizabeth, if that helps any.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Furthermore, Soledad & Yasmin are not that unusual of names
I love the name Soledad. And Pilar as well, another beautiful Hispanic feminine name.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
I have a long Slavic name, which my sister chose to keep after marrying... she likes having that ethnic identity, especially since her husband has a "bland Anglo" name. I don't mind it, except for the fact nobody can spell it correctly!
I have one of the most common Polish surnames in existence -- everyone has heard it, there is more than one famous person with that name. Yet when I give someone my name, they ask me to spell it -- and then, invariably, they exclaim: "Oh, just like it sounds!"
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Old 11-20-2013, 10:56 AM
 
132 posts, read 256,433 times
Reputation: 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
For girls, McKenzie is by far the worst IMO. Hope, Destiny, Faith, Quinn, Molly, Claire, Madeleine, Katelyn, Abigail, Jenna, Heather, Cathy, Caitlyn, Hannah, Grace, Demi, Katie, Chloe, Gertrude, Margot, Olga, Bertha, Bridget, and anything that ends in -lynn.

For guys, Caleb is the worst, followed by Jayden, Brayden, Ayden, Caden, Sladen, Kaden, Rayden, Skyler, Tanner, and Logan.

On the flip side, I think Penelope, Sofia, Olivia, Sveta, Yesenia, Yelena, Yasmin, Yardenia, Izabela, Natalia, Kseniya, Graciela, Consuela, Marisol, Soledad, and Ariana are beautiful names.

For guys, I love names Maksim, Andrei, Ismael, Tyshawn, Aleksei, Salvador, Miguel, Bautista, Cristobal, Volodya, Vitaly, Fernando, Yaroslav, Miroslav, Nikolai, Gabriel, and Andres.
Beatrice, Hazel, Ruth, Heather, Katie, Mary Ann, Gertrude, Gretchen, Bill, Bob, Tom, Ken, Mike, Justin, John, Jason, Todd, Brad. Hate them all.
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Middle America
37,223 posts, read 43,464,057 times
Reputation: 51926
I have never met a Grandison...apparently, the places it's trendy don't include places I've lived.
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,919 posts, read 6,262,458 times
Reputation: 6146
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
[/b]


Archer and Hunter are surnames which one might assume occurred in earlier generations of families. As you note, this naming pattern is quite common in the South, particularly among families who've been around for a while.

I like this custom - there are many examples in my own family - but I very much dislike giving a child a surname (as a first name) which does not occur anywhere in the family tree. All those McKenzies and McKennas and Grandisons and Reagans - who have absolutely no connections whatsoever to the McKenzie, McKenna, Grandison, and Reagan families! Almost all families have interesting, attractive, and perfectly functional surnames in their previous generations - why not use those??

Gunnar is a Scandinavian given name, often misspelled as "Gunner", and it's becoming more popular these days, it seems. There's a "Gunnar" featured on ABC's "Nashville", in fact, who may be inspiring some new parents to give their baby boys this name.
I was going to post almost everything in the post and I am glad you did it first. Good post and true.
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Old 11-20-2013, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
59,736 posts, read 57,202,309 times
Reputation: 71171
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I have never met a Grandison...apparently, the places it's trendy don't include places I've lived.
Lol. Same here. First time I've seen that one.
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Old 11-20-2013, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,919 posts, read 6,262,458 times
Reputation: 6146
I have a traditional name. I like traditional names. My children have traditional names, though I struggled with one of the grandparents being named Thelma. Used the middle name as a compromise. All my southern family has traditional, no double names and no weird spellings.

I really enjoyed this thread.
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Old 11-20-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,223 posts, read 43,464,057 times
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I think I mostly prefer traditional names that aren't currently enjoying a wave of being popular or trendy. It's a good mix of not-super-out-there without being incredibly dull and common (case in point on the "common" front...I had, at one point, NINE Jacob/Jakes in my classroom. It was getting pretty close to half the boys being named Jake or Jacob, and this was even PRE-"Twilight," I'm sure it got even worse for a bit after that) Looking to previous generations for non-oddball, traditional names that aren't big in the current rotation seems like a pretty reasonable way of achieving this.
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Old 11-20-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
11,882 posts, read 11,543,759 times
Reputation: 6331
Very common names pronounced in a lousy manner like John, Mike, and Joe are boring.

I like German names (Ex: Hans & Bach) on guys when pronounced firmly with the accent of fully pronounced English names with a Scottish slang (Ex: James & Gavin).

For women, Russian names when pronounced with the accent threaten my sense of security. Sorry, you ladies are too tough for me.
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Old 11-20-2013, 01:59 PM
 
1,592 posts, read 1,677,700 times
Reputation: 3111
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I think I mostly prefer traditional names that aren't currently enjoying a wave of being popular or trendy. It's a good mix of not-super-out-there without being incredibly dull and common (case in point on the "common" front...I had, at one point, NINE Jacob/Jakes in my classroom. It was getting pretty close to half the boys being named Jake or Jacob, and this was even PRE-"Twilight," I'm sure it got even worse for a bit after that) Looking to previous generations for non-oddball, traditional names that aren't big in the current rotation seems like a pretty reasonable way of achieving this.
Jacob is a family name in my husband's family so even if I hated it, I'll still have to name my son it if we ever have a son.
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Old 11-20-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Temporarily, in Limerick
2,898 posts, read 5,340,861 times
Reputation: 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adi from the Brunswicks View Post
Very common names pronounced in a lousy manner like John, Mike, and Joe are boring.
What does that mean?

Quote:
I like German names (Ex: Hans & Bach) on guys when pronounced firmly with the accent of fully pronounced English names with a Scottish slang (Ex: James & Gavin).

For women, Russian names when pronounced with the accent threaten my sense of security. Sorry, you ladies are too tough for me.
Wow. You're going to give yourself a headache & confuse yourself & others if you wander around pronouncing names in the accent from the culture in which a name derived. You're also assuming that person is a particular nationality or perhaps religion based on their given name, which isn't necessarily true. People might just assume you're mocking them.

Sharon is originally a Hebrew name. No one I've ever met with the name is from Israel, Jewish or even speaks a hint of Yiddish. Have seen a plethora of very un-Irish looking Seans... or Shawn, Shaun & however else they now spell it, including girls. I'm assuming their parents just liked the sound of the name & in many cases, don't even know it's Gaelic in origin for John. Why would you want to fake a brogue to pronounce their name? I've lived in some 'hoods where you'd better be prepared for a good sprint, if that were the case.

And, I suppose we all make assumptions when we hear names. If someone were breaking into my home & the dispatcher said she's sending over Officer Mary Lou or Lonnie... I'd feel better if s/he said Officer Rocco or Damien.
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