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Old 11-23-2013, 07:28 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
13,692 posts, read 15,778,970 times
Reputation: 13262

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Females: Gertrude, Bertha, Lovely
Males: Elmer, Dick
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,903 posts, read 61,310,179 times
Reputation: 55090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
A name you hardly ever hear is Joan. I've never known another one besides my sister. Here's another thing you don't hear much now - my mother was Catholic and gave all seven of her children the names of saints. That was very typical in Catholic families back in the day and if you didn't have a saint's first name you certainly had one for a middle name! All those Annes and Marys as middle name.
I think it's still pretty common, even if a lot of people will use variants of the basic names -- Andrea is a feminine variant of Andrew, Evan is a variant of John, etc. I know plenty of Joans -- and my first name is a variant of Joan, along with the middle name Anne. I wasn't named after saints, though; I was named after my grandmothers, but no doubt they were named after saints.

Quote:
Originally Posted by geebabe View Post
I love my name, LORRAINE along with the traditional spelling.
Very nice.

Quote:
A fun thing to do is pick out a name for yourself if you had to change it. I wouldn't want to change mine but if I had to the only name I could come up with is Claire.
I would have been Elizabeth; it's regal, and there are a number of nicknames and diminutives that go along with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Not to mention Bertha from "Troglodyte":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCV6paTXyCU

"Cave men. Cave women. Neanderthals."
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Temporarily, in Limerick
2,898 posts, read 5,337,690 times
Reputation: 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Au contraire, I think considering the meaning of the name, either in general (David means "beloved") or to the person, as in naming someone for a relative, is a nice thing. I honestly find it much better than this Aiden, Braden, Caden stuff that is totally (IMO) meaningless.
No name is meaningless & derivations of names will always exist. In your example, David, an oft-heard name may not be to one's liking, for that simple fact... it's far too common. As you said, in Hebrew it means beloved, but he's also the Patron Saint of Wales. Some may be drawn to it for either reason or not, or simply like the sound.

Aiden can mean small fire in Gaelic, as well as other meanings. Braeden can mean, son of Aiden in Gaelic or wide, roving fields in Welsh & has other Gaelic meanings. Caeden is son of Braeden & has other meanings, as well.

Those names are important cultural/familial names to some... fine, proper names, all. Others may have no idea of the meaning behind it, but the sound is pleasant to them. They all sound like fine names to me. None are made up, unless we consider that at some point, all names were made up.

Heritage bashing isn't necessary. If you don't like Laquisha, don't use it. Out of curiosity, I looked it up. It can be considered a derivation of Kezia, a Hebrew name meaning cassia tree, as well as many other derivations of names in different cultures... French, Arabic. Maybe one's parents met where a cassia tree was common or met at Cassia Lake.

I'll bet many don't like your given name, whatever it is, as with mine & everyone else's. I like my name. Never met another with it. It might sound made up to some... ah, but it has great meaning if one would dare to explore the derivation.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:39 AM
Status: "Happy New Year!" (set 16 hours ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
88,550 posts, read 104,881,764 times
Reputation: 34100
Calm down there, will ya? When did I bash anyone's heritage? When did I say anything about Laquisha? Do note, upthread, another comment about "Jayden". Please note thread title, too.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 11-24-2013 at 12:49 AM..
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Old 11-24-2013, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Ohio
15,496 posts, read 13,932,160 times
Reputation: 21447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Not to mention Bertha from "Troglodyte":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCV6paTXyCU

"Cave men. Cave women. Neanderthals."
LMAO!

Since you are from Ohio, you may remember this version, as I do. Remember "Lil John and Big Chuck" WEWS Channel 5 out of Cleveland?

Here is their version, starring Lil John....and yes......I always think of it when I hear the name Bertha.



Troglodyte 1974 Jimmy Castor Bunch RetroDan@GMail - YouTube
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Wallace, Idaho
3,354 posts, read 6,031,345 times
Reputation: 3547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie53 View Post
That's why I just don't understand why anyone would pick a name based on what it means. No one you meet is going to care what your name means.......except possibly, your mother.
Yes, but *I* care. Names are not just random strings of letters thrown together. They have histories and actual meanings (well, other than the modern made-up ones). And I would much rather give my child a name with a pleasant meaning than one that may sound nice but have an unpleasant definition. "Mallory" means unfortunate, "Claudia" means crippled, "Cameron" means crooked nose, "Kennedy" means misshapen head. Why would I want to name my child something that literally means "crooked nose"? What do you do if your kid ever asks what his or her name means? I want my kids to have names they'll be proud of.

That's why all these "-son" names and "Mc/Mac" names are ridiculous on girls. They're patronyms. McKenzie means "son of Coinneach." Madison means "son of Maud." Son, not daughter.
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Old 11-24-2013, 01:26 PM
 
Location: SF CA, USA
4,188 posts, read 4,488,797 times
Reputation: 4953
Chelsea or Tracey are names that annoy me for some reason.
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Old 11-24-2013, 03:05 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
7,319 posts, read 4,856,740 times
Reputation: 9489
Names I don't like? Anything ukneeque or trendeigh. I'm all about classic, timeless names.
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Old 11-24-2013, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Northern Minnesota
30,501 posts, read 2,693,032 times
Reputation: 9977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian71 View Post
Yes, but *I* care. Names are not just random strings of letters thrown together. They have histories and actual meanings (well, other than the modern made-up ones). And I would much rather give my child a name with a pleasant meaning than one that may sound nice but have an unpleasant definition. "Mallory" means unfortunate, "Claudia" means crippled, "Cameron" means crooked nose, "Kennedy" means misshapen head. Why would I want to name my child something that literally means "crooked nose"? What do you do if your kid ever asks what his or her name means? I want my kids to have names they'll be proud of.

That's why all these "-son" names and "Mc/Mac" names are ridiculous on girls. They're patronyms. McKenzie means "son of Coinneach." Madison means "son of Maud." Son, not daughter.
I agree and am happy to say that my grandchildren were all given names where both the meaning and the sound were taken into consideration.
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Old 11-24-2013, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,086 posts, read 12,295,812 times
Reputation: 9724
My heritage is Russian and I married a Jewish man. We speak English at home, but we live in a French environment. When I had my son, the name had to be Russian-Hebrew-French-English, which was rather challenging.
I settled on Simon, which is a name I love. You don't hear it too often in North America.
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