U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Fashion and Beauty
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 11-29-2013, 02:54 PM
 
Location: SC
389 posts, read 583,900 times
Reputation: 611

Advertisements

I have a bachelor's degree that is useless and I am about to turn 30. Have worked very low-paying jobs throughout my 20s and am ready for a career, but don't want to spend the time and money getting a masters (and in this economy even masters-grads are having a hard time). However, I'm worried I don't have the makings of a cosmetologist in me. I'm not a girly-girl (though not a tomboy, either), would not even own make-up if it weren't for the fact I have terrible skin, am not into outlandish, trendy hairstyles or unnatural hair colors not found in nature, and shop at thrift stores for classically-styled clothes. I also consider myself a minimalist ( I own 4 pairs of pants, about 10 shirts, one skirt, 3 pairs of shorts, 3 pairs of shoes including one pair of snow boots -- you get the point), which seems to fly in the face of how I view the beauty community -- always having to buy the next new beauty product/more clothes/shoes/hair accessories/hair styling products, etc. I mean, I use natural baby shampoo on my hair and no other products AT ALL.

Will I fit into the cosmetology culture or not? Am I over-thinking this? I am drawn to the field because it's a skill that is always needed, even in tough economic times, and I can have my license in a year, maybe even a little sooner.

Thanks for any advice!

Note: Please move to the employment forum if this would do better over there.

Last edited by ThisIsMe123; 11-29-2013 at 03:09 PM.. Reason: added info
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-29-2013, 03:34 PM
 
13,223 posts, read 8,101,054 times
Reputation: 25599
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisIsMe123 View Post
am not into outlandish, trendy hairstyles or unnatural hair colors not found in nature, and shop at thrift stores for classically-styled clothes. I also consider myself a minimalist ( I own 4 pairs of pants, about 10 shirts, one skirt, 3 pairs of shorts, 3 pairs of shoes including one pair of snow boots -- you get the point), which seems to fly in the face of how I view the beauty community -- always having to buy the next new beauty product/more clothes/shoes/hair accessories/hair styling products, etc. I mean, I use natural baby shampoo on my hair and no other products AT ALL.

Will I fit into the cosmetology culture or not?
I would say no. I have a few friends who work at high end salons, and they are all very much into trendy hairstyles and the latest fashion. And since they are required to sell beauty products to their clients, they also use a lot of different hair styling products. They go to a lot of trade shows throughout the year, and are involved in the wedding conventions, fashion shows, and a lot of other beauty/fashion events in the area. I know I wouldn't want to go into a career that I have very little interest in, and especially one where you have to spend time outside the job going places and learning about the latest and greatest in hair care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-29-2013, 11:05 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,317 posts, read 21,446,800 times
Reputation: 27012
If you don't have any real interest in the career, and it's possible to get a license within a year, then there are probably already tons of people who are truly passionate about it who are already doing the job who are going to be more successful than you. Do you want to spend a year learning and getting your license, then end up selling hair color at Sally's?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2013, 01:00 AM
 
3,058 posts, read 6,742,812 times
Reputation: 2075
I went to school to be a manicurist and worked at a salon so know some hair dressers. At the salon I worked at it was high end and you had to be an assistant before you could get a chair. In the state I live you can also apprentice for I think 2 years at a salon and then take state boards. Not all states you can do that. In the long run at the salon I worked at it was better to be an apprentice because you saved the money of the school and if you went the school route that would be one year and then assisting till you got a chair would be a year. Not all salons are like that.
If you want to finish the school in less then a year it is full time working hour days. It is also expensive so you may want to look into the cost. Also if your area allows you to apprentice. This could give you a feeling if you are going to enjoy the job or if you are good at it. Some people are not trendy but I do feel you need to have a talent and a good eye.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2013, 06:08 AM
 
4,168 posts, read 5,029,373 times
Reputation: 11143
Also consider longer-term, if you might want to run a salon. You'll have to be good not only managing money & supplies, but managing people, both customers & stylists, and that's the trickier part of the job because there are some big personalities in the beauty biz. However, as you describe your style, there are lots of women out there who want a clean, classic look and will gravitate to stylists who have that look.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2013, 06:30 AM
 
11,624 posts, read 9,117,455 times
Reputation: 29646
Not to sound harsh but, your degree is not useless. People with all types of "soft" degrees get jobs everyday. If you can't find a job, I would suggest you re-consider how you are looking for a job.

You can go to cosmetology school if you want to but it won't be a guarantee of anything.

Put together a life plan and see what can be done with your current qualifications. You said you have been working low paying jobs. Why? Have you ever gotten a job at a company where you can apply for internal promotion? That's a quicker and better route to go to build a career.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2013, 07:26 AM
 
14,000 posts, read 62,555 times
Reputation: 21626
Stop at a cosme school or two in your area, ask to speak with the program director and explain your situation to him/her. You will probably walk away from the idea afterwards. Unless it is something you really want to do, are willing to work crazy hours on your feet, put up with strangers and their often unreasonable demands and life stories and scrape by until you have a reputation and steady clientele and can pay the tuition - take a long and hard look at it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2013, 06:27 PM
 
Location: SC
389 posts, read 583,900 times
Reputation: 611
Thanks for the replies! It seems most of you think it wouldn't be a good idea. I have decided to table the issue for now and not to pursue it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Fashion and Beauty
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top