U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Independence Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Fashion and Beauty
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-31-2019, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Texas
12,843 posts, read 5,267,991 times
Reputation: 24869

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by celticseas View Post
It seems that a black person from Africa/of African descent who admits to bleaching their skin faces far more stigma than a Chinese, Korean person who does it. They'll be typically called a "self hater", "mentally ill" (referring to body dysmorphia). The same however doesn't apply to Asia. There is criticism but not to the same degree..
Not trying to be disagreeable but actually, I have heard the term self-hatred in relation to Asians bleaching their skin. I wasn't aware it was common in African countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-01-2019, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Elysium
7,899 posts, read 4,373,428 times
Reputation: 5638
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Not trying to be disagreeable but actually, I have heard the term self-hatred in relation to Asians bleaching their skin. I wasn't aware it was common in African countries.
Was that actually in Asia or outside of Asia with the person raised under a different set of cultural norms? For the person of Asian ancestry to see the whitener advertising from their forefather nation can be a mind trip. Thus they revert to the indoctrinated response that this is the result of a European colonizer when it may have a local class status symbol as the root.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2019, 10:09 AM
 
587 posts, read 263,242 times
Reputation: 838
I think it's far fetched for a Black to expect their skin to "turn white"

I do know there is a spectrum of "perceived attractiveness" OFTEN WITHIN the African-American community where the "lighter skinned" Blacks are held at a higher regard. I have AA acquaintances and they often talk about skin tone on the spectrum of colors (never about "bleaching" their skin though).
I don't know if the Blacks in other places such as Africa or UK think about the spectrum the same way, as we know in the USA it is because there are just more diversity and inter-relations between races so there are more variations in "color spectrum"

As for Asians. Speaking for myself in California, and lots of Americanized Asians that I know. The tanner, the better.
The Asians in Asia with the whitening products. Different cultural mindset towards beauty- they associate lighter with being more beautiful. I don't think those Asians who use it in Asia are even exposed enough to Western culture to indicate they are using such products to "look more like whites"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2019, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,502 posts, read 6,598,696 times
Reputation: 3713
The OP's question presumes that Africans, African Americans, Blacks, hold themselves to different standards of authenticity than other races/cultures. And there would be some truth to that. The reasons why are complex though, and there is not enough time, nor room, on this thread to fully examine the topic. Colonialism is almost an oversimplification, if not a dismissive, lens through which to view our own colorism, which is why it is almost better to not even discuss the issues at hand than to insult anyone's intelligence.

The question really does not belong in fashion and beauty, IMO, and should probably be moved. So that it can be explored in a way that does greater justification for the arguments presented.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: New to the BA & l o v e it
4,076 posts, read 1,003,607 times
Reputation: 2955
Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
How about it makes no sense to me when any race does this kooky idiocy!?!?!?
It doesn’t have to make sense to you.....adults make their own decisions about this stuff.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2020, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Elysium
7,899 posts, read 4,373,428 times
Reputation: 5638
It looks like Johnson and Johnson is putting their western image and market share above their Asian market.
NPR- Johnson and Johnson to stop selling 2 lines of skin lightening products popular in Asia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2020, 08:07 AM
 
1,310 posts, read 767,908 times
Reputation: 2093
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Agree and disagree.

1. It depends on which Asian. On average, for East Asians, since they tend to be lighter, it is less obvious lightening efforts are happening. It is easily camouflaged as trying to improve evenness. And while some mild lighteners are used, it is more common to see really active sun avoidance stuff - hats, umbrellas and religious use of sunscreen.

2. For South East and South Asians harsher lightening products are common and prevalent. And this behavior is criticized.

3. As for the lightening, it is not always related to colonial ideas. For South Asia, yes. For East Asia* it is mores about class - darker people had physical jobs like farming and rice production. Light skin was a sign of wealth. For South East Asians, both the class and the colonial influence play into it.

In general, society is just starting to recognize colorism in its various forms and impacts.

*The eyelid surgery thing is a recent invention - a leftover from the Korean War. Not colonial times.
Is that so? How about the contrast between fair skin against dark hair may also just be viewed as biologically more attractive for many? I think it looks striking and added to the beauty of ‘black Irish’ such as Dolores O’Riordan, the lead singer of The Cranberries. (However, when taken too far, it can produce the opposite effect by giving a more ghoulish appearance.)

Take a look at ancient pictures and descriptions of the native cultural ideals of beauty in some East and SE Asian cultures, independent of any colonial White influence. It includes fairer skin tone. Any tie-in to class is due to the fact those depicted were important, high class women.

Yes, there is a correlation between skin tone, class, and perception of beauty resulting from it. But I believe there is also a biological drive as well. In fact, fair-skinned women have been known to jump class when their beauty resulted in them marrying higher-classed males (also a world-wide phenomenon).




Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
It looks like Johnson and Johnson is putting their western image and market share above their Asian market.
NPR- Johnson and Johnson to stop selling 2 lines of skin lightening products popular in Asia
Sad, and a sign of the times. Stop dictating or shaming people for their perceptions of beauty, and removing their ability to act on it by projecting your standards on them. What happened to “to each their own”? What happened to the classic business model of supply and demand?

ETA: I don’t use skin bleaching products, yet will defend the rights of those who want to for whatever reasons. Choice.

Last edited by mingna; 06-24-2020 at 08:36 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,855 posts, read 31,414,968 times
Reputation: 27695
Quote:
Originally Posted by mingna View Post
Is that so? How about the contrast between fair skin against dark hair may also just be viewed as biologically more attractive for many? I think it looks striking and added to the beauty of ‘black Irish’ such as Dolores O’Riordan, the lead singer of The Cranberries. (However, when taken too far, it can produce the opposite effect by giving a more ghoulish appearance.)

Take a look at ancient pictures and descriptions of the native cultural ideals of beauty in some East and SE Asian cultures, independent of any colonial White influence. It includes fairer skin tone. Any tie-in to class is due to the fact those depicted were important, high class women.

Yes, there is a correlation between skin tone, class, and perception of beauty resulting from it. But I believe there is also a biological drive as well. In fact, fair-skinned women have been known to jump class when their beauty resulted in them marrying higher-classed males (also a world-wide phenomenon).
Poorer people have to work outdoors, getting darker. Wealthier people got to stay inside unexposed. So fair skin was a sign of privilege. That is where class is tied in. If you were wealthy enough not to work in a rice paddy or other agriculture - that was significant.

I don't buy into contrast as being a primary driver. A lot of the status tied to appearance is learned, not innate (beyond things like symmetry).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:11 AM
 
1,310 posts, read 767,908 times
Reputation: 2093
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Poorer people have to work outdoors, getting darker. Wealthier people got to stay inside unexposed. So fair skin was a sign of privilege. That is where class is tied in. If you were wealthy enough not to work in a rice paddy or other agriculture - that was significant.

I don't buy into contrast as being a primary driver. A lot of the status tied to appearance is learned, not innate (beyond things like symmetry).
The class factor is a correlation, not causation. Meaning, people wanted paler skin not as an aspiration to be higher class (or it’s not the primary motivation), but because they consider paler skin more attractive, both on others and for themselves. I’ve also seen this preference displayed by young children who had not been exposed to Western cultural influences, as well as other demographics and both sexes.*


* My 0.02 as a person familiar with both the cultural influences of both my SE Asian birth country, as well as first hand experience and some historical knowledge of some East Asian countries. At least for the culture of my SE Asian country, which is similar to some East Asian countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Fashion and Beauty
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top