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Old 08-31-2009, 07:32 PM
 
27,306 posts, read 34,220,446 times
Reputation: 35108

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twinkle Toes View Post
No law against it. Sure, it may be low class and not something most of us would wear, but the man has a First Amendment right to freedom of speech.
Actually that would be against the law here. We DO have profanity laws at the beach - it's a family place, and both printed and spoke profanity could actually get you a ticket. I don't think it's enforced often, but the cops will definitely give you a talking to.
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Old 08-31-2009, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
756 posts, read 1,738,554 times
Reputation: 926
The only one that has said anything insightful here (I didn't read the legal posts) is JanuaryGirl.

While I and my husband would never choose to wear a shirt like that, I don't automatically condemn the father's children to a horrible life.

As dream girl pointed out, how many "decent looking" people go home and beat or sexually abuse their children?

A lot of the descriptions of unacceptable parents on this post seem to revolve around social/economic classes. These people may live in a really tough area where things including language, to which I personally would never subject my children, are par for the course. Therefore, even the best intentioned parents think it normal.

Get out of your ivory towers and try to understand that not all people have been afforded the opportunity to move up and out.. I am sure your ancestors were considered crass, ignorant and uneducated at one time as well.
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Old 08-31-2009, 08:12 PM
 
27,306 posts, read 34,220,446 times
Reputation: 35108
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1984vt View Post
Get out of your ivory towers and try to understand that not all people have been afforded the opportunity to move up and out.. I am sure your ancestors were considered crass, ignorant and uneducated at one time as well.

I don't think there is anything "ivory tower" about being respectful of others, or NOT being crass and ignorant.

Good grief!
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Old 08-31-2009, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
756 posts, read 1,738,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I don't think there is anything "ivory tower" about being respectful of others, or NOT being crass and ignorant.

Good grief!
and there you go.
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Old 08-31-2009, 09:44 PM
 
1,343 posts, read 4,727,007 times
Reputation: 847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Okie_Dokie! View Post
I was shopping the other day and saw a couple with three small children. The man was wearing a t-shirt that said "F*** em" in big letters on the front.
Aren't there laws against profanity in public places?
I felt so sorry for those little girls.
I just can't imagine my mom or dad wearing something like that at all!
What is wrong with people today?! No class at all!

Okie
So sad this has become the norm and people are defending this guy's attire. What about the rights of other people and their children who have to witness this?

How much do you want to bet that family's on welfare and has a python for a pet?

Grrrrrrr
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Old 08-31-2009, 10:28 PM
 
27,306 posts, read 34,220,446 times
Reputation: 35108
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1984vt View Post
and there you go.
Exactly.
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Old 08-31-2009, 10:29 PM
 
3,755 posts, read 7,635,263 times
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Freedom of speech - yes - idealogically you can argue all day long- but it is unacceptable - particularly for a parent.
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Old 09-01-2009, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Texas
44,134 posts, read 54,250,117 times
Reputation: 72889
So sad this has become the norm and people are defending this guy's attire. What about the rights of other people and their children who have to witness this?

How much do you want to bet that family's on welfare and has a python for a pet?

Grrrrrrr




There is no such thing as 'the right to not have to look at something you don't want to see." Nice try.
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Old 09-09-2009, 07:04 AM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,531,705 times
Reputation: 4579
Twinkle Toes I've waited for you to show me something in writing that shows I am wrong about the private property thing. I don't see it here, did I overlook it?

Here's what I have been able to come up with.

Freedom of Speech in the Mall

Court decisions concerning non-commercial expressive activity date back to 1980, when the U.S. Supreme Court set the boundaries for what has become a continuing debate. In the case of Robins v. Pruneyard Shopping Center, the Supreme Court said that first amendment free speech rights guaranteed under the U.S. Constitution do not guarantee individuals the right of access to private property for the purpose of keeping people informed through traditional free speech activities.

In other words, the U.S. Constitution protects free speech on public property, but not private property.

Twenty-some states have examined the issue and decided that their constitutions do not protect public access rights on private property.
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Old 09-09-2009, 07:10 AM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,531,705 times
Reputation: 4579
And here is the state law part I was talking about......that you said I was wrong on..

Why can shopping malls limit free speech? - By Dahlia Lithwick - Slate Magazine

The magic bullet in Pruneyard? The high court found that state constitutions may confer upon citizens broader speech rights than the federal Constitution, and the broadly worded California Constitution gave citizens the right to speak freely, even in private malls. The court dismissed the shopping center's claims that such a rule infringed on its free speech rights, by forcing it to tolerate unwanted speech on private property, and rejected the argument that forcing them to open up to public debate constituted an unconstitutional "taking" of private property.
Pruneyard was an invitation from the high court to the states to amend and interpret their own state constitutions to permit free speech in private forums if they so desired.

But 23 years later, only six states have joined California in recognizing a state constitutional right to speak and assemble on private property: New Jersey, Colorado, Oregon, Massachusetts, Washington, and Pennsylvania (and several of them have waffled after doing so).

Even the states conferring these broader speech rights do so only on two types of private property—shopping malls and non-public universities—and the only speech protected there is political speech.
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