Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Fish
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-11-2011, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,016 posts, read 12,582,425 times
Reputation: 9030

Advertisements

I just picked up a nice 30 gallon aquarium. The main purpose for it was going to be to keep my pond goldfish in for the winter. The tank came with 12 nice tropical fish and right now the goldfish and the tropical fish are swimming around happily. I read though that you can't keep these fish together because the goldfish produce too much amonia. I figure there must be some way of either removing the amonia or neutralizing it. Does anyone have any experience or ideas along this line? I woulds really like to be able to keep these fish together. They look great right now. Thanks for any help or ideas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-11-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,187 posts, read 11,933,459 times
Reputation: 3514
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
I just picked up a nice 30 gallon aquarium. The main purpose for it was going to be to keep my pond goldfish in for the winter. The tank came with 12 nice tropical fish and right now the goldfish and the tropical fish are swimming around happily. I read though that you can't keep these fish together because the goldfish produce too much amonia. I figure there must be some way of either removing the amonia or neutralizing it. Does anyone have any experience or ideas along this line? I woulds really like to be able to keep these fish together. They look great right now. Thanks for any help or ideas.
Only way is water change frequently and a lot of it. Tropical fish and gold fish don't go together because they are not the same biotype. Tropical fish will require warmer water as well. They need to be in separate tanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 02:26 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,585 posts, read 81,225,683 times
Reputation: 57822
It will not hurt the goldfish to be in warmer than usual water as long as you get them accustomed to it gradually, I'd be more concerned with their hardiness compared to tropicals, and the possibility that they could introduce diseases that they can tolerate but will kill the others.

Does your pond freeze solid? Mine is 12" to 18" deep, and my goldfish have survived many winters with 4-6" of ice on top. They stop eating about this time and don't resume until spring. If your pond does freeze solid, they'd probably be better off in an unheated garage or shed where
they can stay in hibernation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,016 posts, read 12,582,425 times
Reputation: 9030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
It will not hurt the goldfish to be in warmer than usual water as long as you get them accustomed to it gradually, I'd be more concerned with their hardiness compared to tropicals, and the possibility that they could introduce diseases that they can tolerate but will kill the others.

Does your pond freeze solid? Mine is 12" to 18" deep, and my goldfish have survived many winters with 4-6" of ice on top. They stop eating about this time and don't resume until spring. If your pond does freeze solid, they'd probably be better off in an unheated garage or shed where
they can stay in hibernation.
Well they seem to be really happy swimming around in their new house that is 76F. My pond does freeze solid to the bottom. If it didn't I would leave them in it. You would need a 4ft deep pond around here to be sure it wouldn't freeze to the bottom.
My wife found another beautiful 60 gallon curved front aquarium on line today. It has a great stand and comes with everything but fish. She put in a bid of $200. I hope we get it. The tank I bought the other night was a steal. 30 gal. with everything. Fish, plants and all the accessories for $60.
I think we have decided we will need to keep the gold fish in their own tank. That solves the problem the easy way I guess!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 06:08 AM
 
5,064 posts, read 15,904,022 times
Reputation: 3577
I think it's great that you might get that 60 gallon tank. Thirty gallons is not very big, and goldfish need lots of room. How big are they, and how many? That is very important. A mature comet can reach 12" or more in length. Unless they are really young and you have only a few, 30 gallons wouldn't work. Even 60 gallons could be tight depending on what you have and how many. Goldfish produce lots of waste, and need lots of space so they don't get physically stunted. It's not just a matter of ammonia resulting from mixing goldfish and tropicals, putting them with most tropical fish is just not a good idea. You didn't say what kind of tropical fish you had, but if you are going to keep them separate it's a moot point now. Seventy six degrees is a little cool for some types of tropical fish, too. And some tropical fish have different food needs than goldfish. It would be better all around to have two separate tanks. I currently have six plus a goldfish pond. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,016 posts, read 12,582,425 times
Reputation: 9030
I bought the goldfish just to control the mosquitos in the pond. They are just feeder fish but they are acrually quite beautiful. They grew over the summer from abput 1 inch to two inches. I have 9 of them to bring inside for the winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 07:22 AM
 
5,064 posts, read 15,904,022 times
Reputation: 3577
Ahhh, feeder fish are the common Comet variety. They'll eventually reach 12" in length, maybe in 5 years or so. I just want to point out though, it's an old wive's tale that fish will only grow to the size of their tank/pond. If their tank/pond is too small it will adversely affect their health, which of course you wouldn't want. You will eventually have to make some decisions on how to over-winter them, but for now enjoy.

Here's just a little info on goldfish, describing the need for proper filtration/feeding/tank size. Since your fish will become quite large if they are healthy it's helpful to do the research now:

http://www.peteducation.com/article....+1922&aid=2650

Last edited by andthentherewere3; 10-12-2011 at 07:35 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Fish
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top