Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Fish
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-04-2015, 06:44 AM
 
4,366 posts, read 4,603,539 times
Reputation: 2957

Advertisements

I live in an apartment where I'm not allowed to have pets, but the rent is low enough, so I might just stay here and make do. They will allow me to have aquariums, but I'm not great with fish. I treat them like decoration, usually, because, what can you really do with them? Okay, maybe you can teach them cute tricks, but I imagine that's difficult and rare.

Anyway, I was thinking about getting a salt water aquarium, because they offer very colorful fish and other marine life. Plus, it would be a new experience, but I don't want a particularly fragile set of new pets. I'm looking for resilient pets. As for looks, the weirder the better. I love tiny sea monsters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-06-2015, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
10,399 posts, read 8,077,926 times
Reputation: 27871
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Anyway, I was thinking about getting a salt water aquarium, because they offer very colorful fish and other marine life. Plus, it would be a new experience, but I don't want a particularly fragile set of new pets. I'm looking for resilient pets.
Then you DON'T want a saltwater tank! Saltwater tanks require significantly more maintenance than freshwater tanks (particularly if you want to keep invertebrates). They are not easy to set up and maintain (especially if you like to go on vacation - good luck finding a pet sitter who's competent to manage a reef tank). And the smaller the tank, the more work it is, ironically, because small volumes of water are more prone to big swings in temperature, pH, etc. (and this is true of freshwatrer as well).

I'd suggest doing a lot more research on saltwater setups before you decide to get a tank, lest you bite off more than you're willing to chew.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2015, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Tejas
7,599 posts, read 18,456,097 times
Reputation: 5252
Aredhel hit the nail on the head with that reply.

Fresh has a lot of colour too, there are some great colours that contrast with live green plants etc in a planted tank. Theyre a lot to setup but require very little when done.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2015, 02:01 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 24,934,210 times
Reputation: 9685
I agree, salt is not a good starting point for someone who wants beginner friendly easy maintenance...

if you want color, look into an all male peacock cichlid tank, peacocks are peacefull compared to many cichlids (especially in an all male tank) and fantastically colorful!
while still not "easy" theres no such thing as easy with fish, they require regular water changes and a good filtration setup at minimum.

you might consider an all male guppy tank too don't get much more colorfull than male guppies!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2015, 03:07 PM
 
4,366 posts, read 4,603,539 times
Reputation: 2957
Okay, so clownfish, bio-luminescent crab, and sea anemones are a bad idea?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2015, 04:47 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 24,934,210 times
Reputation: 9685
probably...if you want to stick with the "low maintence" thing at least.

how about glo-fish (genetically manipulated Danios) they look pretty dang cool under a blue antic or even uv/black light! active, hardy, easy keepers...

some people don't like them due to the whole genetic manipulation (jellyfish DNA) but there just as hardy as standard zebra and leopard danios and you don't get much better if your looking for color and cool!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 05:28 PM
 
Location: East Bay Area
1,986 posts, read 3,610,120 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
I live in an apartment where I'm not allowed to have pets, but the rent is low enough, so I might just stay here and make do. They will allow me to have aquariums, but I'm not great with fish. I treat them like decoration, usually, because, what can you really do with them? Okay, maybe you can teach them cute tricks, but I imagine that's difficult and rare.

Anyway, I was thinking about getting a salt water aquarium, because they offer very colorful fish and other marine life. Plus, it would be a new experience, but I don't want a particularly fragile set of new pets. I'm looking for resilient pets. As for looks, the weirder the better. I love tiny sea monsters.
Consider the below quote:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Then you DON'T want a saltwater tank! Saltwater tanks require significantly more maintenance than freshwater tanks (particularly if you want to keep invertebrates). They are not easy to set up and maintain (especially if you like to go on vacation - good luck finding a pet sitter who's competent to manage a reef tank). And the smaller the tank, the more work it is, ironically, because small volumes of water are more prone to big swings in temperature, pH, etc. (and this is true of freshwatrer as well).

I'd suggest doing a lot more research on saltwater setups before you decide to get a tank, lest you bite off more than you're willing to chew.
Freshwater tanks are significantly easier to maintain than saltwater tanks. (I have both, 55+ gallons each)

With freshwater tanks, you can find a colorful assortment of fish, like South African Cichlids. If it's weird, ugly, and monstrous you want, then a Flowerhorn Cichlid, or maybe a Oscar fish. Both get really big and aggressive. With saltwater tanks, the ugly and weird fish are generally the most expensive fish. And if your water parameters aren't ideal, then they'll just die and you'll lose your investment. The size of your tank will determine the type of fish and number of fish you can successfully house.

In order to figure out what makes sense for you:
How much are you willing to spend on an aquarium? How much time are you willing to devote to the aquarium?

Last edited by Stephen1110; 05-10-2015 at 05:42 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 05:46 PM
 
Location: East Bay Area
1,986 posts, read 3,610,120 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Okay, so clownfish, bio-luminescent crab, and sea anemones are a bad idea?
what size tank?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2015, 08:36 PM
 
Location: California
124 posts, read 142,748 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Okay, so clownfish, bio-luminescent crab, and sea anemones are a bad idea?

If you must go with a saltwater tank, a clownfish is a good choice.

If you go on vacation, there are automatic feeders and vacation food.








I used to have a mated pair of clownfishes in a 28 gal nano-cube. They thrived and gave me lots of babies, which I traded to a local aquarium store in exchange for store credit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2015, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
10,399 posts, read 8,077,926 times
Reputation: 27871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen1110 View Post
what size tank?
Remember, your landlord may have restrictions on permitted tank sizes. (And for good reasons - water is HEAVY, and a large tank could exceed the load limit of the floor. Plus bigger tanks mean a bigger mess if a leak occurs.)

Sea anemones are some of the most difficult invertebrates to keep alive (unlike clownfish, which are hardy by saltwater standards).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Fish

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top