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Old 06-25-2020, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
11,685 posts, read 8,376,428 times
Reputation: 14944

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Quote:
Originally Posted by boy3365 View Post
Yes, of course there is a difference between physical and online teaching as there is with physical vs online everything. While some people in all professions are counting down the days when they can go back to the office, mainly for the social aspects, others have found that they increased their productivity working from home (i.e. completing the same work in less time). Yet no one would say that the engineer, lawyer, accountant, etc. in that camp "aren't working."

With all due respect, your family's COVID-19 school experience isn't reflective the quality and/or quantity of work of all teachers and schools. From what I've read, yes, there have been some comments about some teachers who appeared to "phone it in," sending links to YouTube/Khan videos and giving digital worksheets. However, there are plenty of other stories about teachers who created all of their own content, whether it was live through Zoom-type software or pre-recorded videos they made for families to complete on their own schedule. Even if it is pre-recorded, I'd imagine editing would take more time than recording the videos themselves.

A whole cottage industry/community of Facebook groups, blogs, Esty store type stuff have exploded since March with teachers sharing resources and ideas. Mr. Google gave me these.

https://www.businessinsider.com/teac...utdowns-2020-5

https://www.weareteachers.com/virtual-classroom-pics/
You’re right: It could just be that my kids were attending a very sub-par school (they were.)
I do know that the Odyssey software and the grading involved, which is what was used as a state requirement for grade promotion, was state-mandated. But it’s nice to know that some teachers went above and beyond to ensure that students were getting the right level of teaching.
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Old 06-27-2020, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Venice, FL
9,685 posts, read 2,717,306 times
Reputation: 5913
I was for an increase, but I think he went a bit to far with it. I won't lose sleep over it. I'd rather see just good teachers get huge raises than across the board for new hires.

I'd have used 1/2 the cash for new hire base increase, and 1/2 to bonus high performers.

Florida's cost of living is lower than many places, so we dont need to be salary equal, or better than places with state income taxes and higher cost of living.
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Old 06-27-2020, 11:38 AM
 
2,011 posts, read 1,265,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beach43ofus View Post
I was for an increase, but I think he went a bit to far with it. I won't lose sleep over it. I'd rather see just good teachers get huge raises than across the board for new hires.

I'd have used 1/2 the cash for new hire base increase, and 1/2 to bonus high performers.

Florida's cost of living is lower than many places, so we dont need to be salary equal, or better than places with state income taxes and higher cost of living.

I'm not generally in favor of legislative mandates regarding wages, but it's difficult to ignore the data in the county I live in (current as of March of last year):
  • Per-capita income increased 11% from $10.93 to $12.11 ($22,734/yr to $25,188/yr) in 7yrs (+ $2,454/yr).
  • Median home values have increased 100% (from $82k to $162k) in 7yrs
  • Avg rent costs have increased at least 50% (from $725 to $1,100) in 7yrs
  • Food inflation is 11% over 7yrs
  • Health Insurance premiums increased 50% - 300% in 10yrs
  • Avg new car price went from 30k to 37k in 7yrs
  • Forget the new car; over the same period of time:
    • Incomes went up by $204.50/month
    • Mortgages went up by $600 - $800/month (avg $700) (factoring in property taxes, homeowners, PMI where applicable)
      • For renters, monthly rates increased $400/month instead
    • Health Insurance premiums went up $50 - $1,300 (up to 4-person household) per-month (depending upon extent of coverage, employer contribution (or lack thereof), whether plan is self or group-insured, as well as the number of persons covered by a particular policy, and excluding subsidization for most low-income beneficiaries).
Similar stats abound around the state, albeit perhaps not uniformly. I only mention the above info because it's clearly difficult to reconcile it with the historical notion that Florida's cost of living is (or at least, still is) inherently 'low,' which implies that the rather obvious problem illustrated above doesn't exist. It does exist however, and it admits of negative long-term prospects that need to be considered soberly.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:54 PM
 
2,015 posts, read 2,807,553 times
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OpinionInOcala is spot on.

This ongoing notion that the typical salaries for jobs in Florida for any profession are acceptable solely because of the tax structures and/or cost of living in other places are supposedly higher just doesn't work anymore. It's like the people still chastising poor people for having smartphones when significant discounts such phones are everywhere. An iPhone in 2008 was a luxury item. An iPhone SE, 8, or X(10) can be found at bargain prices and may very well double as the family computer.

When it comes to cost of living, the typical comparisons are California, the Northeast, etc. The major cities of Texas are conveniently always missing from the list, possibly because they are also without a state tax and they are more affordable, with Austin being the possible exception.

Distributing raises based on the COL of each county is fine and probably a good idea. $47K is probably still tough in Miami.

Florida has had numerous bonus schemes over the past 20 years among other things, and they have not brought the academic results or teacher retention the citizens were promised.
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