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Old 03-10-2024, 01:14 PM
 
24,396 posts, read 26,936,812 times
Reputation: 19962

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Seems it would. You know social workers, others who work with substance abusers have a term for those free needle, free other IV drug supplies, and other measures that look to allow people so inclined to continue addictive or other behaviors. It's called "harm reduction" or "harm mitigation". Their rationale, it would seem, is to mitigate the number of infectious diseases associated with the use of unclean needles, sharing IV drug supplies, unprotected sex involving people with HIV or other STDs, or bloodborne diseases, and pointers for minimizing infectious disease risk when injecting drugs. To this end they also encourage healthcare providers to train and be accessible ( for free, in some cases), be understanding and sympathetic to addicts to treat their illnesses, and of course money money money to fund all this. They really push the harm mitigation measures though. I'm not sure how successful those measures are towards curbing addiction, or homelessness in the long run, though.

I got this information from a book I read, "The Opioid Epidemic and Infectious Disease". I wasn't familiar with the information presented in the book, was, to put it mildly, flabbergasted at the liberal policies ( such as harm mitigation) and what looked like permissive, even encouraging perspectives towards the addictive behaviours ( for lack of a better way to put it) and looked around online to see if this was the prevailing perspective towards drug addiction among those who work with it, and it seemed to be that it was. Maybe it's just facing the realities of the drug addicted on their part, and going from there. I sure couldn't work in that field.
All it does it put non-addicts more at risk. You can look it up if you want, but these sites only get around 60% of the needles back… that means there are millions of used needles in parks, sidewalks, beaches thanks to these sites. I use San Francisco as my example because I moved from there and visit a couple times a year since I’ve moved because we have family there, so all these things I mention I’ve seen it with my own eyes. Not only do these sites put more used needles on the ground, they increase the overdose rate as well by ALLOWING these illegal drugs to be bought/sold/used. If you want to see some real sh*t, I can tell you a couple streets where you can probably witness someone overdosing if you just walk back and forth for an hour on any given day. The mentality of let’s enable these addicts their addictions that are the main reason for their mental illnesses and homelessness is so ridiculous. And once again, only puts the general public at higher risk of stepping on a used needle on the sidewalk, at a park, at the beach. Supporting this is literally KILLING people! So while your thinking might come from a good place, look in the mirror before calling others heartless. Witness it for yourself and maybe you will realize… enabling them, is only causing more harm.
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Old 03-10-2024, 02:41 PM
 
18,428 posts, read 8,262,327 times
Reputation: 13761
I still think it's hysterical that San Francisco bans plastic bags and straws....

...while at the same time

handing out...literally....millions of plastic syringes.....~400,000 a month....~5 million syringes a year X 60% = 2 million unaccounted for
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Old 03-10-2024, 03:33 PM
 
17,280 posts, read 22,006,628 times
Reputation: 29586
Many on this thread are confusing a few issues:

Homelessness is usually bundled with unemployment, substance issues, mental health issues. The state struggles to handle all of the issues as a whole. You can takeover a substandard hotel/motel and solve the homeless part but if they are unemployed/high and crazy then you really didn't solve anything.

A camp is really just a nuisance after a few days. The trash piles up, the restroom facilities are not there and they are still homeless. The issue needs to be divided: homeless singles/ homeless families. Of course if you do a really good job at helping you will soon be overwhelmed. Surrounding cities will be dumping their homeless on you!
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Old 03-10-2024, 03:47 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
14,928 posts, read 12,130,043 times
Reputation: 24777
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw335xi View Post
All it does it put non-addicts more at risk. You can look it up if you want, but these sites only get around 60% of the needles back… that means there are millions of used needles in parks, sidewalks, beaches thanks to these sites. I use San Francisco as my example because I moved from there and visit a couple times a year since I’ve moved because we have family there, so all these things I mention I’ve seen it with my own eyes. Not only do these sites put more used needles on the ground, they increase the overdose rate as well by ALLOWING these illegal drugs to be bought/sold/used. If you want to see some real sh*t, I can tell you a couple streets where you can probably witness someone overdosing if you just walk back and forth for an hour on any given day. The mentality of let’s enable these addicts their addictions that are the main reason for their mental illnesses and homelessness is so ridiculous. And once again, only puts the general public at higher risk of stepping on a used needle on the sidewalk, at a park, at the beach. Supporting this is literally KILLING people! So while your thinking might come from a good place, look in the mirror before calling others heartless. Witness it for yourself and maybe you will realize… enabling them, is only causing more harm.
I don't recall calling anyone heartless, I'll tell you I had to pull a major attitude adjustment to even read through that book without putting it down in disgust cussing about the what looked to me like coddling/enabling of the drug addicts in supplying them with their needs to continue their habits. The topic was timely and relevant to the personnel who would be using this book for continuing education credits to maintain their professional state licenses, the science and medicine was good so I stuck with it and wrote the multiple choice questions needed to make it a course. I just had a hard time with the "harm reduction" message pushed by the authors.

So as much as the authors touted the effectiveness of "harm reduction" measures, it sounds as though these needle and drug supply programs are just the opposite, enabling even worse behavior, increasing drug addiction, and more danger to the public. Somehow I'm not surprised, and I certainly believe what you're saying without having to look it up. Just wondering if the harm mitigation/reduction proponents can see this, or are they stuck on their own version of the facts. They certainly were critical in the book I mentioned of local and state governments who would not expand funding for these programs, and they advocated increases in these measures as *one of the best ways* to decrease incidence of infectious diseases in the addicted. Sounds as though that can't be true either.

Believe me, I'm on your side with this topic!
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Old 03-10-2024, 03:50 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
14,928 posts, read 12,130,043 times
Reputation: 24777
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Many on this thread are confusing a few issues:

Homelessness is usually bundled with unemployment, substance issues, mental health issues. The state struggles to handle all of the issues as a whole. You can takeover a substandard hotel/motel and solve the homeless part but if they are unemployed/high and crazy then you really didn't solve anything.

A camp is really just a nuisance after a few days. The trash piles up, the restroom facilities are not there and they are still homeless. The issue needs to be divided: homeless singles/ homeless families. Of course if you do a really good job at helping you will soon be overwhelmed. Surrounding cities will be dumping their homeless on you!

True enough.. So are solutions to homelessness that solve all the issues even possible? I have to admit I don't know....
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Old 03-10-2024, 05:05 PM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
3,428 posts, read 2,396,448 times
Reputation: 10024
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
True enough.. So are solutions to homelessness that solve all the issues even possible? I have to admit I don't know....
Socialism, in one form or another, "solves" the homelessness problem. When everyone is given a home, food, a clothing stipend, utility credits, 100% free medical help, rehab, etc - courtesy of ALL the citizens - then the problems are solved. But the USA is not a socialist society. So here, in the USA - no, there is no solution to homelessness.

There are many countries that have fewer homeless "per 10,000 people" than the USA. However, there are even more countries that have significantly more homeless "per 10,000" people than the USA. Our homeless rate is around 20/10,000. To compare, South Korea is less than 2/10,000, Japan less than 1/10,000, Switzerland is less than 3/10,000. Columbia is over 130/10,000, Saudi Arabia is almost 175/10,000, and Syria leads the pack with a whopping 2302 homeless per 10,000 people.
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Old 03-10-2024, 05:22 PM
 
85 posts, read 32,102 times
Reputation: 153
I mean, good? Places like Portland and SF are overrun with dope fiend zombies camping and sh*tting on every corner not because there’s enough shelter space but because they have no means of forcing the zombies to go to a shelter. There’s plenty of shelter beds available but zombies don’t want to go because they won’t be able get strung out on fentanyl.
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Old 03-11-2024, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Free State of Florida
25,694 posts, read 12,779,845 times
Reputation: 19266
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrampaNurgle View Post
I mean, good? Places like Portland and SF are overrun with dope fiend zombies camping and sh*tting on every corner not because there’s enough shelter space but because they have no means of forcing the zombies to go to a shelter. There’s plenty of shelter beds available but zombies don’t want to go because they won’t be able get strung out on fentanyl.
I agree...the stricter Florida is on them, the less of them we'll get. I'm for providing a free (taxpayers cost) bus ticket elsewhere one way one time...if they promise never to return. If they return, put them in jail for any law they break, for as long as possible.

I am for funding mental health centers for them to be treated full time, but not come & go as they please, & these places should be remote.
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Old 03-11-2024, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Boston
20,099 posts, read 9,003,220 times
Reputation: 18747
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjairo191 View Post
Another law that probably wont be enforced.
exactly. What would enforcement look like? Put them in jail? Fine them? lmao

such silliness. Sounds like something Biden would want to do.
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Old 03-11-2024, 08:25 AM
 
85 posts, read 32,102 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeddy View Post
exactly. What would enforcement look like? Put them in jail? Fine them? lmao

such silliness. Sounds like something Biden would want to do.
Contrary to the left's narrative keeping a fentanyl zombie or a violent gangbanger locked up is a lot cheaper than keeping them on the streets - frequent flyer zombie will rack up annual incarceration cost worth of ER bills in less than a month and a gangbanger will be even quicker, all it takes is a single shooting or stabbing.
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