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Old 12-05-2010, 08:13 PM
 
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I'm a single guy in my 40's, cook lots of things, but can't seem to get pancakes right more than 1 in 10 times. I use the 'add water only' premix, figuring that if millions of people can use them so can I. I have a flat electric griddle, nonstick, that I use only for pancakes. On a given day, the pancakes are underdone, overdone, tough (most often), mealy, and even crispy. I've tried different temps, different mixing methods, different everything I can think of. I don't understand why I can't get this simple thing right, consistently.

Dammit.

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Old 12-05-2010, 09:21 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
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Secret is not to over-mix the batter. There should still be small clumps of mix in the batter - if it is smooth like cream, it's over-mixed. I've never used an electric griddle, because I find that I can adjust the heat much better on a gas stove. You're looking for a medium heat that will slowly cook the first side so the edges are slightly dry and the middle is bubbly when you are ready to flip it. If the first side is getting dark too fast, then the middle might have raw parts even when both sides are nicely browned. If it cooks too slowly, then you will have a tough cake.

I hope this helps!
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
Secret is not to over-mix the batter. There should still be small clumps of mix in the batter - if it is smooth like cream, it's over-mixed. I've never used an electric griddle, because I find that I can adjust the heat much better on a gas stove. You're looking for a medium heat that will slowly cook the first side so the edges are slightly dry and the middle is bubbly when you are ready to flip it. If the first side is getting dark too fast, then the middle might have raw parts even when both sides are nicely browned. If it cooks too slowly, then you will have a tough cake.

I hope this helps!
This morning I put the water in the bowl, the mix on the water, then I shook the bowl until the mix settled into the water. Ran a fork through the batter a couple times, and poured it on the griddle. The pancakes were so tough I tossed them into the wooded part of my yard, right off the griddle. The squirrels probably enjoyed them.

Unfortunately I don't have a gas range. I've been told that the water should dance on my griddle when it's the right heat.

This can't be this difficult for other people.
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:30 PM
 
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Medium heat, that will instantly sizzle a drop of water when you drop it on the griddle. Don't over mix the batter. You will flip the pancake when bubbles start to break on the surface, but NOT so long that they remain open. You want them to break and close. Flip them at that point. The second side will take less time, perhaps half the time or slightly less than the first side did.
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Old 12-05-2010, 11:46 PM
 
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I can't cook a decent pancake on non stick. I cook pancakes in a clad stainless steel skillet.

Mix Original Aunt Jemimah with milk, egg, and oil as directed. it will easily pour out of the measuring cup to which you move it.

Spray Pam in skillet then wipe it out with a paper towel. Put skillet over medium heat until water drop sizzles out. Put a thin pat of butter into the pan. It will melt. When it turns brown around the edges of the butter pour the batter into the melted butter.

When the bubbles subside flip it over. If it is not perfectly browned on the bottom, throw it away and start again with the melted butter in the pan. If it was too light, leave it on longer, too dark turn the heat down. Between pancakes wipe out the skillet with the Pan soaked paper towel.

Enjoy!
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Old 12-06-2010, 05:59 AM
 
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I personally prefer to make my own pancakes. It really isn't that hard. My favorite recipe is by Alton Brown; it's a pancake mix you make ahead of time, then just use it as a "mix" whenever you want pancakes. Are you putting any kind of oil on your griddle? Even if it's non-stick, you should add a little. Instead of butter as Alton recommends, I pour a little vegetable oil on the griddle, and wipe it gently with a clean paper towel, just to spread a thin coat over the surface. Keep in mind that the first few pancakes you make will not have that nice light brown color that the following pancakes will have, too.

Instant Pancake Mix Recipe : Review : Alton Brown : Food Network
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Old 12-06-2010, 06:33 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
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My husband makes terrific pancakes. I always believed in the "don't overmix" way and used to get after him about leaving lumps in the batter, but he whisks the batter and they come out fluffy and wonderful.

Fluffy Pancakes Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Best pancakes ever.
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Old 12-06-2010, 07:28 AM
 
7,735 posts, read 6,703,951 times
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My secret to pancakes is not to overmix, allow enough time for griddle to get hot enough on medium heat, and don't flip until it bubbles. I also add a quarter cup (or usually one of those lunch-box sized containers) of applesauce to the batter - it makes the pancakes fluffier for some reason, with a faint sweet taste from the apples. Sometimes I add flavored applesauce - like strawberry, pomegranate or THE BEST - blueberry. You can really taste the blueberry in it. MY DH loves them. Great with blueberry syrup.
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Old 12-06-2010, 07:39 AM
 
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We have one of those $20(on sale) electric non-stick griddles. I think she put's the temp to 400 and it works good. She doesn't make them too big either, 6" dia or so.

Pancakes aren't too easy, don't beat yourself up and try so hard. I've found when cook'n to not try to be perfect, perfection doesn't work in the kitchen. But, make sure you have the mis en place or what ever it's called.

Good luck, Take pix if you can
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Old 12-06-2010, 08:21 AM
 
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I'll try to post the recipe when I get home - but I have a recipe from a friend -- an OLD recipe (their family is norwegian, orignally) -- makes a very light, and tasty pancake (almost a crepe).

It uses:

Cottage Cheese (1 cup)
Sour Cream (1 cup)
Eggs (not sure how many, want to say 4)
Mix well (in a blender, actually)
Oil (not sure, 1 tsp or 1 tbsp)
Pinch Salt
(Mix)
Add 1 cup flour, w/ 1 teaspoon baking soda.

Makes a pretty thin batter.

Its very easy to make (just putting it all in the blender). The only thing is I don't always have cottage cheese.

I love the recipe because its heavy on protein and my dad (dialysis patient) needs protein.

Also - it really tastes light. I love good buttermilk pancakes, (never made 'em) when I can get them. But this recipe is great and cooks up wonderfully.

As others have stated, pour onto hot pan, (water should sizzle), as soon as the edges are done and the pancake will stand up to a spatula -- flip. The pancake will puff up for a minute (due to the baking soda??) then settle down.

If I remember when I get home, I'll post the recipe with exact amounts. My approximations are close, but "close" in cooking can be disasterous!!
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