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Old 11-26-2007, 07:36 AM
 
Location: in the southwest
13,394 posts, read 43,264,737 times
Reputation: 13515

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MovingBack2PA View Post
Yes, Butterball Turkeys ARE injected. The fresh Butterball usually have a higher butter and broth injection, then the frozen ones.
But, nonetheless...those turkeys can STILL be injected (think brown sugar etc), and can STILL be deep fried.
Can or should they be brined, though?
I was really wondering about this, and finally googled it.
The results from Chowhound and Serious Eats had the most detailed, if somewhat inconclusive information. Some say you can, some not.
I think I probably would not, but that's just me.
Chowhound
Serious Eats
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Old 11-26-2007, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,203 posts, read 26,129,546 times
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Moderate to good success baking a turkey (approx. 11lbs) in an electric stove. It seemed to cook much faster than gas but I kept an eagle eye out and it turned out better than I expected and was tender.

Had 2 Thanksgivings, and the second was a brined fresh.

So I'd give this holiday an A++.
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Old 11-26-2007, 09:21 AM
 
Location: All around the world.....
2,886 posts, read 7,960,921 times
Reputation: 1070
Thanks for sharing your stories; I'm glad to hear that they're all success stories;
But just curious no one had a flop" ? Well I guess not or they would have shared this with us; Most interesting recipes here especially for "fried turkey"; I hope that this doesn't make the proverbial baked Turkey Dinner" obsolete.
Even though it has been4 days of leftovers; I think I'll try it again Christmas; I'm upset that I cannot enjoy the leftovers, Have a toothache and the dentist can't get me in until tommorow, Schucks!!; I don't care for frozen leftovers, unless someone has a super exciting and delicious recipe.
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Old 11-26-2007, 10:33 PM
 
16,489 posts, read 23,369,437 times
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I used to think "bigger was better" and would buy these big honking turkey's each Thanksgiving. They tended to be dry and there was so much leftover meat some went to waste. Now I buy smaller young Butterball turkeys and they are great. I make a coating for the outside of a stick of butter, a little parsley, black pepper and Adolphs Meat Tenderizer. I put that all over the outside (after I have washed and dried the turkey. I cook it in a cooking bag and they are great!
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Old 11-27-2007, 05:29 AM
MB2
 
Location: Sebastian/ FL
3,496 posts, read 9,113,153 times
Reputation: 2752
Quote:
Originally Posted by cil View Post
Can or should they be brined, though?
I was really wondering about this, and finally googled it.
The results from Chowhound and Serious Eats had the most detailed, if somewhat inconclusive information. Some say you can, some not.
I think I probably would not, but that's just me.
Chowhound
Serious Eats
It can never hurt to brine meat, making it more juicy and tender.
You are infusing it with moisture, having enzymes break down the meat and muscle fiber.
Why WOULD brining hurt????
Isn't making it tender and juicy the whole point?
IMHO, yes, I would definitely say yes....all turkeys can be brined in the raw state.
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Old 11-27-2007, 05:35 AM
MB2
 
Location: Sebastian/ FL
3,496 posts, read 9,113,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencrayola View Post
I used to think "bigger was better" and would buy these big honking turkey's each Thanksgiving. They tended to be dry and there was so much leftover meat some went to waste. Now I buy smaller young Butterball turkeys and they are great. I make a coating for the outside of a stick of butter, a little parsley, black pepper and Adolphs Meat Tenderizer. I put that all over the outside (after I have washed and dried the turkey. I cook it in a cooking bag and they are great!
Every bird, up to approx. 16/ 17 pounds are hens, above that all the way to 30 something pounds are tom's.
Bigger certainly isn't always better.
Smaller ones (hens) have more bone to meat ratio then the tom's, but, the hen's have less muscle tissue (making the tom's sometimes a bit chewy, and the meat more dense and dry)
My preference? Two smaller ones versus a larger one.
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Old 11-27-2007, 06:29 AM
 
Location: in the southwest
13,394 posts, read 43,264,737 times
Reputation: 13515
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovingBack2PA View Post
It can never hurt to brine meat, making it more juicy and tender.
You are infusing it with moisture, having enzymes break down the meat and muscle fiber.
Why WOULD brining hurt????
Isn't making it tender and juicy the whole point?
IMHO, yes, I would definitely say yes....all turkeys can be brined in the raw state.
It's just that I'd rather enhance the turkey's flavor with my own ingredients, rather than Butterball's:
...basting recipe (water, salt, modified food starch - corn or potato source, sodium phosphate and natural flavors)...
Butterball baste

I'll do my own sodium. Now a fresh, untreated Butterball turkey would be no problem, though I do like buying the organic ones.
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Old 11-27-2007, 06:44 AM
MB2
 
Location: Sebastian/ FL
3,496 posts, read 9,113,153 times
Reputation: 2752
Quote:
Originally Posted by cil View Post
It's just that I'd rather enhance the turkey's flavor with my own ingredients, rather than Butterball's:...basting recipe (water, salt, modified food starch - corn or potato source, sodium phosphate and natural flavors)...
Butterball baste

I'll do my own sodium. Now a fresh, untreated Butterball turkey would be no problem, though I do like buying the organic ones.
Cil, looking at it from THAT point of view, YES, I am 100% WITH you!
There's nothing better, EVER, then doing your own....no matter what it is.
YOU decide what goes in it, and you will KNOW what's in it!
Safest and healthiest way to go, hands down.
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Old 11-28-2007, 05:46 PM
 
154 posts, read 408,019 times
Reputation: 352
I always put a moist paper towel over my left over turkey underneath the plastic wrap. The turkey doesn't dry out as fast!
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Old 11-28-2007, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,360 posts, read 11,754,963 times
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I don't have available to me kosher or free range turkeys only Butterball or store brand. I've brined both kinds and they come out great, tender and tasty.

I cover them in water with kosher salt for about 15 minutes in the sink and that does it. I haven't tried overnight or other ingredients for soaking though that sounds good. Then I sprinkle liberally with Bell's and garlic powder and stuff with whole wheat stuffing mix, onions, celery, apple pieces, raisins, and walnuts.
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