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Old 03-02-2014, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Oviedo
452 posts, read 678,563 times
Reputation: 937

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I use a 1961 Corningware percolator every day.

I have a Keurig (for someone that drinks a pot or two of coffee a day, Keurig is not practical) and a (Braun? Rival?) drip coffee maker. One is too costly, the other can't make a robust (enough for me) coffee.

I like strong coffee, really strong coffee. (My mother calls it "dredge coffee" and my husband calls it "50wt".)
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Old 03-03-2014, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
5,217 posts, read 7,191,264 times
Reputation: 7223
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeannaC View Post
I use a 1961 Corningware percolator every day.

I have a Keurig (for someone that drinks a pot or two of coffee a day, Keurig is not practical) and a (Braun? Rival?) drip coffee maker. One is too costly, the other can't make a robust (enough for me) coffee.

I like strong coffee, really strong coffee. (My mother calls it "dredge coffee" and my husband calls it "50wt".)
I wish I still had my old Corning Ware percolator now. It made goooood coffee....lol. I wonder what I did with it.

I have used a drip perc for years and it is just okay. I tried the French Press and as someone said, it doesn't stay real hot because I like a couple of cups.

Quote:
9. Is drinking coffee made with a paper filter healthier than drinking boiled coffee or other types of coffee?
Quote:
Coffee contains a substance called cafestol that is a potent stimulator of LDL cholesterol levels. Cafestol is found in the oily fraction of coffee, and when you brew coffee with a paper filter, the cafestol gets left behind in the filter. Other methods of coffee preparation, such as the boiled coffee common in Scandinavian countries, French press coffee, or Turkish coffee, are much higher in cafestol. So for people who have high cholesterol levels or who want to prevent having high cholesterol levels, it is better to choose paper filtered coffee or instant coffee, since they have much lower levels of cafestol than boiled or French press coffee. Espresso is somewhere in the middle; it has less cafestol than boiled or French press coffee, but more than paper filtered coffee. Coffee and Health | The Nutrition Source | Harvard School of Public Health
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Old 03-03-2014, 05:43 AM
 
3,188 posts, read 7,500,024 times
Reputation: 2458
My mom who drinks a lot of coffee for many years had a percolator because she felt the coffee was hotter then a drip maker. Then she got a Keurig which I was surprised about because she does not like kitchen gadgets but she loves the Keurig maker better.
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Old 03-03-2014, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
20,244 posts, read 26,095,167 times
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My friend has a farberware percolator that you plug in. If I had not gotten the Keurig as a gift that would have been my other choice for a coffee maker. I do love my Keurig and since hubby and I only drink 2 cups a day each it's practical for us.
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Old 03-03-2014, 10:09 AM
 
372 posts, read 681,759 times
Reputation: 633
Used a percolator back in the day and always wound up adding salt to get rid of the bitterness. Maybe in a pinch, but not so much anymore.

A few principles.

Get rid of the chlorine in your water.

Figure out your preferred method of brewing.

Figure out your favorite bean.

Figuring out the above is directly tied to your coffee grind.

In other words, the finer the grounds, the shorter the brew time with a variable being how strong the roast is or how green it is.

Use a burr grinder if you like grinding your own to get the best results. Blade choppers are great for spices, not coffee grinding.

Use a quality appliance as your brewer.

Drips: Krups and Braun (I have a Krups and it's my daily go to machine that wakes me up)

French Press: Bodum Chambord (When I have guests or indulge on the weekends for a REALLY great cup) These will not fall apart.

Only keep a balanced amount of coffee beans on hand. If you like keeping more on hand, get a vacuum sealer with the container option. If you have to freeze your beans, the only way to do it and keep them fresh is removing the air. Keeps out moisture and the smell from other things inside your fridge. They go stale very quickly sitting in the cabinet or your counter top.

Once removed from the freezer and begin to thaw, do not refreeze them.

Some may ask, how did I learn all this? Trial and error over the years. Started when I was stationed up in Alaska. Until then, I never touched a drop ever. I soon learned to appreciate something hot at 40-50 below and really didn't care how it tasted out in the field as long as it was hot. It then carried over to my home.

On the flip side, in the summer months, instead of Ice Tea, my preference is Iced Coffee. When I brew mine for this, I always brew it stronger to offset the ice cubes that will dilute the strength.

Over the years in the military, I swore that once I got out (22 Years) no more drinking from a canteen cup. No more instant coffee or non dairy creamer. No more bad cups of coffee. I've had enough of those over the years and know how to appreciate a good one.

A good water filtration system, a quality machine and proper method of brewing. Unbleached filters, fresh beans, decent burr grinder (I use a Krups) and the proper grind size are all key to me in getting it right.

Once I'm done brewing, unless it's just me, the finished product goes into a thermal carafe, where it maintains the temperature without burning up on the warmer and stays hot all morning.

With the French Press, you only consume pretty much what you make right then and there, so that's a given. As for espresso, that's how I do mine and not with a machine. With a machine, the machine creates the pressure, with the press, YOU create the pressure.

To finish it off, a blend of evaporated milk and Half and Half and a dash of sugar.

With my drip machine, I descale mine every 6 months with white vinegar and then, 2 full brew cycles of water only. Some will ask why not more? Keep in mind every bit of my water is filtered, not once, but twice. Once from my counter top filtration system and then the coffee makers internal filter. If it weren't filtered, with the mineral and chlorine content we have here in our water system, I'd be doing it every 3 weeks.

On the machine, I change the internal filter every 6 months.

My preference for a truly great cup of coffee will always be my press. Hands down. But my drip machine is my daily driver and though it's 5 years old, it's still a work horse and does a great job, day in and day out.

And if you're really a true "Coffee Connoisseur" you owe it to yourself to make a trip to the Seattle area. Caffeine Capital of the US.
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
81,702 posts, read 75,241,915 times
Reputation: 104568
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneuvakind View Post
Used a percolator back in the day and always wound up adding salt to get rid of the bitterness. Maybe in a pinch, but not so much anymore.

A few principles.

Get rid of the chlorine in your water.

Figure out your preferred method of brewing.

Figure out your favorite bean.

Figuring out the above is directly tied to your coffee grind.

In other words, the finer the grounds, the shorter the brew time with a variable being how strong the roast is or how green it is.

Use a burr grinder if you like grinding your own to get the best results. Blade choppers are great for spices, not coffee grinding.

Use a quality appliance as your brewer.

Drips: Krups and Braun (I have a Krups and it's my daily go to machine that wakes me up)

French Press: Bodum Chambord (When I have guests or indulge on the weekends for a REALLY great cup) These will not fall apart.

Only keep a balanced amount of coffee beans on hand. If you like keeping more on hand, get a vacuum sealer with the container option. If you have to freeze your beans, the only way to do it and keep them fresh is removing the air. Keeps out moisture and the smell from other things inside your fridge. They go stale very quickly sitting in the cabinet or your counter top.

Once removed from the freezer and begin to thaw, do not refreeze them.

Some may ask, how did I learn all this? Trial and error over the years. Started when I was stationed up in Alaska. Until then, I never touched a drop ever. I soon learned to appreciate something hot at 40-50 below and really didn't care how it tasted out in the field as long as it was hot. It then carried over to my home.

On the flip side, in the summer months, instead of Ice Tea, my preference is Iced Coffee. When I brew mine for this, I always brew it stronger to offset the ice cubes that will dilute the strength.

Over the years in the military, I swore that once I got out (22 Years) no more drinking from a canteen cup. No more instant coffee or non dairy creamer. No more bad cups of coffee. I've had enough of those over the years and know how to appreciate a good one.

A good water filtration system, a quality machine and proper method of brewing. Unbleached filters, fresh beans, decent burr grinder (I use a Krups) and the proper grind size are all key to me in getting it right.

Once I'm done brewing, unless it's just me, the finished product goes into a thermal carafe, where it maintains the temperature without burning up on the warmer and stays hot all morning.

With the French Press, you only consume pretty much what you make right then and there, so that's a given. As for espresso, that's how I do mine and not with a machine. With a machine, the machine creates the pressure, with the press, YOU create the pressure.

To finish it off, a blend of evaporated milk and Half and Half and a dash of sugar.

With my drip machine, I descale mine every 6 months with white vinegar and then, 2 full brew cycles of water only. Some will ask why not more? Keep in mind every bit of my water is filtered, not once, but twice. Once from my counter top filtration system and then the coffee makers internal filter. If it weren't filtered, with the mineral and chlorine content we have here in our water system, I'd be doing it every 3 weeks.

On the machine, I change the internal filter every 6 months.

My preference for a truly great cup of coffee will always be my press. Hands down. But my drip machine is my daily driver and though it's 5 years old, it's still a work horse and does a great job, day in and day out.

And if you're really a true "Coffee Connoisseur" you owe it to yourself to make a trip to the Seattle area. Caffeine Capital of the US.
This is the one I had. It's a Bodum, but not the Chambord. I only paid $35, not $60, but it only lasted about a month before the top cracked and then the pieces came apart and I couldn't get them back together again.

BISTRO | Electric French Press coffeemaker, 4 cup, 0.5 l, 17 oz Lime green | Bodum Online Shop | United States

I never got the connection between Seattle and coffee, though I know now that it's supposed to be. I just don't know why. I remember seeing a shop called "Seattle Coffee Company" or something and thinking, "Huh? Why would a reference to Seattle be relevant here and what does it have to do with coffee?" But I think Starbucks (which I don't care for) started there, too, didn't it?
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Old 03-03-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,969 posts, read 27,004,669 times
Reputation: 10710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I never got the connection between Seattle and coffee, though I know now that it's supposed to be. I just don't know why. I remember seeing a shop called "Seattle Coffee Company" or something and thinking, "Huh? Why would a reference to Seattle be relevant here and what does it have to do with coffee?" But I think Starbucks (which I don't care for) started there, too, didn't it?
It's because the evolution of contemporary "gourmet coffee" began in earnest in Seattle in the 1970s, and then pushed a taste revolution across the country. Starbucks was a product of that movement, not the source of it. Partly it happened because Seattle had a large Scandinavian community, and they're major, major coffee hounds. And partly it happened because Seattle is cold and wet much of the year, and coffee bars became popular, affordable places to get together and get warm with friends. The latte, a mixture of strong coffee and hot milk, was particularly good for warming up with, and it became the signature Seattle beverage.

Seattle's Best Coffee, formerly Stewart Brothers Coffee, now Seattle Coffee Company, is actually older than Starbucks, but is now owned by them and is a secondary product brand for them. It was a key player in the big game when its Pike Place shop first hit $1.3 million in sales in a year, mostly from hot-coffee-in- a-cup sales, thereby electrifying the industry. In an era when coffee-to-go was basically either Folgers or Maxwell House, brewed in a Bunn automatic drip machine, SBC's walk-in trade was a massive achievement. A shrewd marketing man, recognizing the potential, bought a tiny coffee business nearby called Starbucks, which was also bustling, and a short time later a Starbuck's espresso cart outside the flagship Nordstrom department store in Seattle passed a million bucks in annual sales. That really set off a gold rush across the country to jump on the gourmet coffee bandwagon.

Not to say that there were not parallel developments in other parts of the country. Peet's Coffee in Berkely, California was founded in 1966, and was actually the supplier for Starbucks for a while at the beginning. (Shhhhhhhh). And espresso had long been served in Italian and Cuban restaurants and bodegas, but Starbucks was the company that popularized darker roasts and espresso brewing and put their shops on so many street corners over time. As well as Seattle Coffee Company shops in places where the Starbucks name may appear too upscale.

And that's the Seattle connection.

Last edited by OpenD; 03-03-2014 at 07:57 PM..
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Old 03-03-2014, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,969 posts, read 27,004,669 times
Reputation: 10710
Percolators were the first "automatic" coffee makers, and they still have adherents, just as some people like their breakfast toast very well done. What both prove is that taste is extremely subjective, and given the chance, people will come to prefer almost any darn thing at all, based on what they're used to.

What professional coffee tasters say is that percolators make the hottest, bitterest, and most acrid coffee short of just boiling it in a pan. They fill the kitchen with delicious coffee aroma, rather than putting it in the cup the way coffee presses do. And they do that by boiling the coffee and passing it through the grounds repetitively. And yet some people get accustomed to that taste, and think it's best.

At the other end of the flavor scale, the press-pot coffee that coffee tasters prefer brews coffee with water that is slightly below boiling, because it is considered optimum for extracting the desirable flavor elements while leaving undesirable fractions behind. When combined with a thermal housing these can keep coffee at peak flavor and serving temperature for an hour or more, but they do require a bit more attention to the brewing process, rather than just flipping on a switch and walking away.

Somewhere between the two are the automatic drip coffee makers. Although the manual filter coffee makers can make coffee close in quality to pressed coffee, the typical paper filter does add a slight taste that some do not like, although it produces a clearer coffee with less "mud" than fine metal mesh filters do. Drip makers just automate the process, by heating small amounts of water at a time from a reservoir, in a tiny electrical cup, causing some of it to turn to steam, which forces hot water up a tube to spray over the coffee grounds, from which they in turn drip down to a pot, which typically has a heating element under it to keep it hot, or an unheated thermal carafe. The brewing element shuts off once all the water has boiled out of the reservoir. The heater under the pot, if there is one, may turn off after a specified time, or just keep cooking the coffee indefinitely, which keeps it hot but gives it a more and more burnt taste as time passes.

Should I leave room for milk?
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Old 03-04-2014, 02:10 AM
 
Location: Declezville, CA
16,798 posts, read 38,044,931 times
Reputation: 17571
I use a Bunn drip machine for daily coffee. They're the only drip machines I'm aware of that heat the water hot enough for proper extraction.

I bought one of these last year for making coffee on the gas stove in case the electricity goes away. After a bit of practice, I can brew up a pot with the percolator that's as good or better than the drip machine.
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Old 03-04-2014, 07:17 AM
 
7,672 posts, read 12,031,968 times
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Percolators hands down. I despise drip. As others said I like French press the best. Third would be my keurig with the solofil k cup and my coffee beans. With four coffee/tea drinkers in my house, keurig is the preferred choice.
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