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Old 11-11-2022, 02:07 PM
 
1,300 posts, read 1,364,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Gosh, I feel like I must be a relic. I still use the old method of using herbed butter under the skin to help flavor my turkey breast, an onion in the cavity. I slide a large metal spoon under the skin to create pockets for the butter.

OP if you don't like the skin, take it off AFTER cooking, not before. The skin helps keep in flavor and moisture while it cooks.
As far as seasonings that's pretty individual, traditionally it's a mix of parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, and garlic, but you can certainly change that up.
Here's a fairly good article describing how to season and bake a turkey breast, along with a few options for mexican, cajun, maple, and bacon wrapped turkey too. https://www.dinneratthezoo.com/roast...breast/#recipe
Guess I'm a relic as well, i still use that method. I tend to be a bit more basic with seasonings: salt pepper poultry seasoning...

but most important is keep the skin on until done cooking. That is a huge part of the flavor. I also stuff mine, which helps as well.
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Old 11-11-2022, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Florida
453 posts, read 308,642 times
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If you're cooking it from raw, you soak it in BRINE first for awhile where you can add stuff. It's a whole process.

You could try buying a single BREAST where it's sorta brined. Or just the legs with more fat so more flavor. Not the whole bird.

Also it's possible you eat all your other food WAY WAY seasoned so turkey won't ever taste right.

Do you eat it in a restaurant? Where there's probably high sodium.
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Old 11-11-2022, 03:26 PM
 
7,228 posts, read 4,931,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
LOL! Made me laugh. This is what I used to just detest about the "old days" when a turkey had to be tended from dawn to afternoon.

I have morbid thoughts about getting up at the crack of dawn and wrestling that cold, dead carcass around the kitchen doing unspeakable things to its corpse.

After fifty-some years I've finally liberated myself. And turns out everyone is satisfied.

But the last few years I was getting good at producing a fairly tasty turkey. It's a bit of an oxymoron.

I came to say, brine it, stuff it and season under the skin. All three. Those dratted birds.

I used to make a cake pan of extra dressing and then after the turkey was out of the oven gently mix the stuffing from the bird into the pan dressing to add more turkey flavor to it. Don't forget you can stuff around the neck cavity, too.
That’s so funny. I used to LOVE the prospect of prepping and stuffing the big ol’bird at the crack of dawn, then having to watch it and baste it all morning. And getting to smell that roasting turkey alllll day. Yum.
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Old 11-11-2022, 05:29 PM
 
30,752 posts, read 21,622,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sm0key View Post
What spices do you put on these things to make 'em taste good?
Some turks are just bland jan no matter what ya do. Most of mine come out super good but have had a dud before with no taste.

I just slap some oil on the bird and butter and salt and pepper and slap it in the oven at 350f. Since i live alone i just buy a 11 lb bird and cut it in half since i can't eat a whole bird by myself. Takes around 2 hours to cook. Never did all that other BS jess like brine and all that crap chaps.
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Old 11-11-2022, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
2,045 posts, read 809,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sm0key View Post
I always get these things called Butterball Boneless Turkey Breast which has almost no gizzards or crap in it. But it has this weird netting you're supposed to leave on while it bakes. And it has all this ugly, smelly, fatty white skin. So I remove the netting so I can peel off the skin before cooking. The skin is hard to peel off and you really can't get it all off. There's always a white membrane left on it no matter how hard you try to get all the skin off.
Oh, I like that turkey!

Besides lunchmeat turkey, my favorite.

But, yeah, roast duck is superior.
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Old 11-11-2022, 09:36 PM
 
4,393 posts, read 4,267,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sm0key View Post
I always get these things called Butterball Boneless Turkey Breast which has almost no gizzards or crap in it. But it has this weird netting you're supposed to leave on while it bakes. And it has all this ugly, smelly, fatty white skin. So I remove the netting so I can peel off the skin before cooking. The skin is hard to peel off and you really can't get it all off. There's always a white membrane left on it no matter how hard you try to get all the skin off.
I think that your problem may lie in the turkey that you choose.

For the life of me, I can't understand why people want to skimp on the main event on Turkey Day! I always buy a fresh Butterball turkey, usually 15-21 pounds, depending on how many are coming. This year we only have six, so I'm shooting for a 15-pounder. Leftovers must be figured into the count.

One year I needed a large turkey and there were none in the market, so I got two 12-pound turkeys, one a fresh Butterball and one a fresh Honeysuckle White. The difference was stark. Even though they were the same weight and size and cooked side by side, the Butterball was beautiful and succulent, while the Honeysuckle White didn't crisp up as well, and was significantly drier. I was sold and have never bought anything else since. I hope the avian flu doesn't change anything but the cost. I would hate to have to buy a frozen turkey pumped up with fluid to increase the weight.

All I do to my turkey is wash and dry it, rub handfuls of salt all over, and shove half a stick of frozen butter under the skin on each breast. I cook it at 325 for 15 minutes per pound, basting it after an hour or so, and retrieving drippings for the gravy near the end. The bird rests a good quarter of an hour or more before being carved. It has never been anything but moist and delicious. I could do a testimonial for Butterball!

My dad taught me that you get what you pay for. If you pay for a cheap turkey, you're likely to get a cheap turkey. I want the main attraction to the the star of the show, not a bomb.
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Old 11-11-2022, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Lexington, Kentucky
14,952 posts, read 8,268,672 times
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Brining helps a whole lot, then douse and rub down with olive oil and liberally apply Garlic Salt, , Herbs de Provence, pepper and Paprika. Sage, rosemary, thyme are good too. (You can rub it down with a good quality butter instead of Olive Oil, if you prefer)

This is one of my favorites for the Holidays (brine kit and spice rub all in one)

Urban Gourmet Gobbler


A lot of people swear by Butterball (and it is good) but my favorite turkey from the Supermarket is Honeysuckle White....but the very best turkeys are bought from local farmers (that can be pricey though.)
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Old 11-12-2022, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
282 posts, read 221,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sm0key View Post
I always get these things called Butterball Boneless Turkey Breast which has almost no gizzards or crap in it. But it has this weird netting you're supposed to leave on while it bakes. And it has all this ugly, smelly, fatty white skin. So I remove the netting so I can peel off the skin before cooking. The skin is hard to peel off and you really can't get it all off. There's always a white membrane left on it no matter how hard you try to get all the skin off.
Get the version of the Butterball turkey roast that has both white and dark meat if you can, it's better. They also have an herb-flavored version that I've never tried, but you might like it. When you cook the white meat roast don't take off the skin! Wait until it's cooked and take off the skin. The skin is there to give it flavor and keep it moist with some fat. You may not like it raw, but it's gonna be better cooked to leave it on!
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Old 11-12-2022, 07:48 AM
 
19,221 posts, read 25,536,424 times
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I used to do a "conventional" wet brining, but that is a massive PIA. Instead, I now use a Dry Brine, which doesn't require overnight soaking in water, and only requires rinsing before you roast it. This is the product that I prefer:

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/prod...YaAocAEALw_wcB

Either a wet brine or a dry brine will give you a much juicier bird, without the need for the chemicals that are injected in "self-basting" turkeys.

Before I put the bird in the oven, I fill the cavity with fresh thyme and rosemary, celery, and onion, and I rub the skin with butter. If it starts to become too brown before cooking is complete, simply tent it with some foil.
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Old 11-12-2022, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
30,773 posts, read 18,515,875 times
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Salt, pepper, and garlic is all you need, IMO. But I'd also rub some softened butter under the skin and on the skin when roasting and baste the bird in its juices as appropriate. But don't be afraid to be generous with the seasonings.
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