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Old 05-08-2013, 01:47 PM
 
2,574 posts, read 4,952,636 times
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My brother is 7 years older than I am, and even he can't handle many of the things I eat. Once in my pre-vegetarian days I mentioned to him about how much I liked certain kinds of sushi. He said, "I could never eat raw fish. I didn't grow up eating food like that." Well, we grew up in the same house with the same parents so I'm not sure why that was an excuse. He also won't eat olives, mushrooms, oatmeal, hummus, quinoa, and a lot of other common foods. My parents both died long ago, so he functions as my narrow-food-minded stand in.

I find people who are conservative (not in the political sense, but the broad sense) about what they eat can also be very closed to adventurous new experiences. He won't travel to a country where they don't speak English, whereas I prefer to travel where they don't.
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Old 05-08-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Garlic grows well in containers but you need a container about 18" deep and with plenty of room for each garlic bulb - use well-draining soil or the bulbs will rot.
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:37 PM
 
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My sister lives in LA, our parents on a farm in Wisconsin. She once took them to a Mexican restaurant. Dad fussed about it the whole way there. She told him not to worry, that he could get a hamburger. His response? "They'll probably put something funny on it."
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:44 PM
 
3,591 posts, read 5,024,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
If your parents or grandparents were alive today, what would they say about the way we cook and some of the foods we eat, they never heard of in their lives? What would they think about the spices we use and the way we cook?

I know my dad, who was my inspiration for cooking was considered at blue ribbon cook, but he never used cumin or even heard of it, nor did he attempt Greek or Indian food and rarely Chinese except for rice. Grilling a vegetable would never have entered his mind and he used the broiler all the time. We have never used our broiler. I am sure a George Foreman grill would have blown his mind.

My moms mom, who was a wonderful farm cook would roll over in her grave, to think we buy pie shells already made or use something called olive oil.
I think my parents and grandparents would be somewhat horrified at

the use of olive oil in cooking, grilling fish meats and vegetables, lemon juice on something other than fish, various types of ethnic cooking (wild about Greek, Italian, Japanese, Persian cuisine)

My Mom would call those foods "tasteless" or "too dry" or "strange"
My Dad would say something like, "That's okay, I'm not hungry. You can have my share."
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:59 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,822,125 times
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My grandmothers were both ethnic, Italian and Czechoslovakian, respectively. They cooked and ate the food of their homeland. Although, my Italian Grandma did not cook what we think of as "traditional" Italian fare, being from Northern Italy where the sauces leaned more toward Alfredo rather than Marinara.

Mom, on the other hand, cooked to please my father for most of her life which meant a lot of chicken and not much diversity in the vegetable department. Personally, I do not particularly like some of the more "modern" offerings that have become trendy and fashionable. Whomever the idiot was that decided that lamb should be laden with Rosemary should be drawn and quartered as far as I am concerned. As far as Chinese or Indian food, I can take it or leave it.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:43 PM
 
4,875 posts, read 6,442,875 times
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My grandmother would love convenience food. She was a great cook but found it time consuming and since she worked time was something she didn't have alot of. She loved to eat and enjoyed many different types of food in her day. I can see her stepping up and trying almost anything, except probably sushi. She would most likely draw the line with that.
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:54 PM
 
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Fortunately for me both sets of Grandparents were very adventurous in their cooking styles taking from the old country and applying modern California styles and ingredients.

Both sets of my immigrant greatgrandparents on the other hand. VERY old school Italian/Mexican. If they didn't make it or eat it in the old country they were NOT having it here.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:32 PM
 
7,106 posts, read 5,974,489 times
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My mother's cooking has changed over the past several years (she's 85) and she's now more accepting and health oriented in her cooking. But my grandmother, for sure, wouldn't be happy if she couldn't use lard. Fried pork chops, fried potatoes, fried sausage, fried scrappel, and robust Pennsylvania Dutch cooking were the norm. They also shared the local negative attitude about "foreigners" and this extended to their cooking - for example, they'd say Mexican and Eastern/Asian dishes contained dogs, cats, rats, etc.. The most exotic thing we had was spaghetti (Eye-talyun). I never tasted pizza until I was about ten. Vegetables in their raw/natural form wouldn't be touched until they were boiled until mushy.

Last edited by Mrs. Skeffington; 05-08-2013 at 11:46 PM..
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:55 PM
 
7,106 posts, read 5,974,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs.cool View Post
My sister lives in LA, our parents on a farm in Wisconsin. She once took them to a Mexican restaurant. Dad fussed about it the whole way there. She told him not to worry, that he could get a hamburger. His response? "They'll probably put something funny on it."
Mine would have been concerned they'd put something FURRY IN IT.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,821 posts, read 90,379,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyLane2 View Post
"If your parents or grandparents were alive today, what would they say about the way we cook and some of the foods we eat..."

I would hear this from every one of them:

- these vegetables are not done
- this pork is still pink
very good points: My dad actually didn't overcook our veggies, but my mom in law cooked them to death and often in bacon fat or some type of animal lard and she had a favorite pork chop recipe she loved to serve. The pork chops (very thin ones) would be cooked with veggies for at least two or three hours on top of the stove. As for Mexican food, my parents loved it and dad loved hot peppers. My mom in law loved it as well: to her Mexican food was tacos or enchiladas, I doubt she ever had a burrito, or any other things we enjoy. Hot sauce, she would dip a chip in it: shake the chip 'til all the sauce was off, then take her knife and make sure there was none on the chip. Her idea of making chili: she once told me, how she loved spice, when she made chili, she used 1/2 tsp of chili sauce. I guess you get the idea, what spice and herbs meant to her.
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