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Old 03-31-2020, 03:18 AM
 
Location: Boston Suburb
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Hi. what's the difference between all these?

Can I use any of these for making ice cream in an IC machine? TIA
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Old 03-31-2020, 05:05 AM
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Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Well, the easy answer is since that half and half is called that because it's half cream and half milk, it's kind of a given that it's not going to be the same as the other two.

But I am curious also as to whether it could be used to make a reduced-fat ice cream in a machine.

https://www.allrecipes.com/article/w...d-heavy-cream/
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Old 03-31-2020, 05:07 AM
Status: "Waiting for coronavirus to end..." (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Fat content.
Wonder no more. Like its name suggests, half-and-half is simply equal parts milk and cream. Whereas heavy cream is just, you know, cream.
The real difference lies in the fat content: Half-and-half is 10 - 18% fat, and heavy cream falls between 30 - 36%

The higher the fat content the better/creamier ice cream.
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Old 03-31-2020, 05:22 AM
Status: "Waiting for coronavirus to end..." (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Well, the easy answer is since that half and half is called that because it's half cream and half milk, it's kind of a given that it's not going to be the same as the other two.

But I am curious also as to whether it could be used to make a reduced-fat ice cream in a machine.

https://www.allrecipes.com/article/w...d-heavy-cream/
Ice creams formulated with low fat have poorer flavor and worse texture than a comparable full fat product. You will get a lot of ice crystals in your ice cream.
Adding an egg might help, but then you will be adding cholesterol. Adding more sugar will somehow improve the taste, but will make it less healthy.
Since the fat is a main component of an ice cream, you will be making, generally, a different product.
In other words, you will be making something more like a frozen yogurt or sherbet than an ice cream.
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Old 03-31-2020, 07:02 AM
 
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And there is no difference between "heavy cream" and "heavy whipping cream" other than the labeling.



As for ice cream, the only difference I find is Texture (and I make a lot of ice cream). More fat leads to a Much smoother texture, which is Also softer (doesn't freeze hard, closer to soft-serve in texture) ~ while good, it's too rich and doesn't hit the spot for me. I default to half cream, half whole milk for my ice cream as that's a ratio that's easy to remember and hits close to what i like for texture and hardness. It's WAY creamier than anything you can buy in a store, about on par with most boutique ice cream shops.


As for adding eggs, there are exceedingly few recipes that Don't call for eggs.
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Old 03-31-2020, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Holly Springs, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post

But I am curious also as to whether it could be used to make a reduced-fat ice cream in a machine.
If that were the goal I would search out gelato recipes.

The fat isn't as much for the taste as it is for the mouthfeel. There are plenty of delicious gelato (even soft-serve "ice cream") but it is lacking the mouthfeel of fatty ice cream that Americans are accustomed to (I don't say this in a bad way!).

My family always made homemade ice cream and we typically used custard based recipes for an extra creamy mouthfeel.
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Old 03-31-2020, 07:12 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
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My mother also made a custard with milk, eggs, sugar, vanilla, and she also used Junket rennet tablets. She used this recipe, but used whole milk, not 2%. I think the Junket tablets help prevent ice crystal formation.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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Heavy cream = whipping cream.

Half and half is milk and cream.

In recipes from the UK, they're listed as double cream and single cream or just cream.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:10 AM
 
Location: NYC
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I only use heavy cream in coffee. You will actually lose weight using it as oppose to skim or low fat milk. Because heavy cream has less sugar. Yes, that's right. It is mostly fat and no carbs.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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Milk in coffee is awful. If there's no real cream, I drink it black.
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