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Old 05-26-2020, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
29,614 posts, read 20,401,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Remember mince meat pie: It was awful in my opinion and remember the ever popular sweet potatoes at Thanksgiving complete with marshmellows and canned pineapple along with brown sugar. Oh God was it sweet!!!
Sweet potatoes and marshmallows was a 1950s concoction, and I am not sure sweet potatoes were that popular north of the Mason-Dixon Line in the 1940s.

Many popular recipes of the 1950s were made popular by large food companies. I suspect the sweet potato dish was one of those. And I agree, mashed, sweetened sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows is a food no one needs.
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Old 05-26-2020, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
29,614 posts, read 20,401,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marehoodlum View Post
OMG that stuff was the BEST!!!!! And yes, we would have one slice and be so excited about it. I feel like i need to make it again...
My mother made cinnamon toast in the oven. I always liked it.
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Old 05-26-2020, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
43,167 posts, read 53,817,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Yes. Women dressed nicely for their husbands then. Watch Mad Men. It's a great period movie. It pictures the 1960, but things didn't get relaxed much.
Women covered their pretty "house" dressed with (also pretty, starched and ironed!) aprons, but removed them after cooking was done.
I remember my mother putting on makeup at around 4:30 every afternoon. She had very sparse eyebrows, so I watched while she penciled them in.
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Old 05-26-2020, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
43,167 posts, read 53,817,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
My mother also born 1919. She sewed her own house dresses. In winter for outside chores she had a pair jeans she wore under skirt. Womens' jeans back then had zipper on side. Not until she was elderly did I see her wear pants without skirt.


Oh talking fashion. See those news stories of people upset about the Muslim women wearing a head scarf. Mom always did and pretty sure she didnt know what a Muslim was. It was an accepted warm head covering for women in winter and there were light open weave ones for warmer weather. She even had the pioneer style "sun bonnet" for summer like you see pics of women wearing in 19th century and earlier. Homemade and was stiffened with strips cardboard. Quite practical in hot summer sun out at the farm. It wasnt something one would wear to town.



Oh mentioning women wearing pants inappropriate. I remember a girl in my class coming to school with slacks under her skirt. It was a COLD BELOW ZERO day, and dont think kids thought anything unusual, but she was sent to office and parents called. Apparently it wasnt cold enough.... Boys got into trouble if hair bit too long. Not talking long hair, or orange hair, or anything like that. just if it was bit over shirt collar. Control freaks in charge of the insane asylum.
We wore snow pants under our skirts in the winter, but we didn’t leave them on in school.
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Old 05-26-2020, 12:15 PM
 
11,564 posts, read 7,568,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Sweet potatoes and marshmallows was a 1950s concoction, and I am not sure sweet potatoes were that popular north of the Mason-Dixon Line in the 1940s.

Many popular recipes of the 1950s were made popular by large food companies. I suspect the sweet potato dish was one of those. And I agree, mashed, sweetened sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows is a food no one needs.
I wonder if the gross casserole made with canned green beans, canned mushroom soup, and canned fried onions was from this era.

My sister's mother-in-law grew up in the 1940s on a farm in South Dakota where they barely had electricity and indoor plumbing. She and her mother and sisters cooked everything from scratch, at great effort.

Once she got married, moved to the city, and had access to "modern" supermarkets, she was completely done with cooking. Even boiling potatoes was too much work--she served her own family instant mashed potatoes, as well as canned ravioli, frozen dinners, and every other convenience food known to man.

That food sounds appalling to me because I cook almost everything with fresh ingredients, but I also realize I'm not up against what she had to deal with on the farm. It's a lot easier for us now with all of our appliances and easy access to supermarkets.
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Old 05-26-2020, 01:06 PM
 
11,528 posts, read 13,075,510 times
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Prob. meat and potatoes heavy and tons of casseroles, which endured into the 50's and 60's. I think the casserole spell was broken in the late 70's/early 80's?
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Old 05-26-2020, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
11,771 posts, read 11,025,697 times
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My affluent grandmother in Charleston, South Carolina would make something called Head Cheese.

She would literally boil a pig head for hours. Or I should say her cook did. As a little girl I was always scared to go into my grandmother's kitchen.

I have a first printing of Charleston Receipts from the 1950s that actually has some of her recipes. The recipe for the St. Cecilia's Punch makes me laugh because it serves 1800 people.

They ate a lot of seafood and a lot of seasonal produce.
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Old 05-26-2020, 03:49 PM
 
2,809 posts, read 7,169,267 times
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We lived in Ct,,we primarily lived off the land,there were no super markets to speak of.
We had a cow,raised a pig for meat,chickens,fruit tree's,had a sand pit for winter storeage of beets,carrot's,potatoes.
My job as ayoungdter was to drop cow manure in tomatoe hole and cover with dirt.
There was no money among us to speak of.
Used a 25 Maxwell to plow field.
I worked 55 flood with electric co.,56 ice storm with telco,as said all hand labor.
Later in life worked for telco as a lineman,no power equipment,all hand labor for $1.00 per hour.
People today don't know what work is.
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Old 05-26-2020, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
71,401 posts, read 67,434,666 times
Reputation: 89194
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I wonder if the gross casserole made with canned green beans, canned mushroom soup, and canned fried onions was from this era.

<snipped>
I guess you missed this particular news item from about a year and half ago. Rest in Peace, Dorcas Reilly

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...ole-180970635/


In 1955, Dorcas was working as a supervisor at the home economics department of a Campbell’s test kitchen in Camden, New Jersey, when she was tasked with creating a recipe for a feature that would appear in the Associated Press. The recipe had to be based on ingredients that any home cook would have on hand, including Campbell’s mushroom soup and green beans.
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Old 05-26-2020, 04:30 PM
 
15,471 posts, read 26,946,516 times
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Another thing that has to be mentioned is the meat, the produce, and the impact of Blue Laws which closed grocery stores on Sundays in many communities.

Back then, meat hit the stores on carcass. Your butcher would get a carcass of beef (either sides or quarters), whole pigs that were gutted, poultry and the like. And retail cuts were done in the store. The benefit of this approach was that there was a wider variety of retail cuts than you will find in the mega-markets today. The disadvantage was that the butcher had to sell all of the cuts - i.e., liver, kidneys, bones, etc. Most of the cheaper cuts required a lot of cooking which was fine as most women did not work outside the home other than during wartime.

Groceries closed at 6 pm of Saturday nights until Mondays. That means, after Noon on Saturday, the butcher and produce guys would offer specials to get rid of all of the meat and produce in the stores.

Also, in many city areas, produce, meat and a variety of products were sold off of carts that came to your home. If you were a regular customer, they would ring your bell and fill your order on the spot.

In the 1970s, I spent many Friday mornings riding with my mother to pick up her great aunt (b. 1895) and head to the market for produce and other needs. She had a good variety of stories about the olden days.
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