U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-26-2020, 04:32 PM
 
11,300 posts, read 7,315,031 times
Reputation: 30051

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I guess you missed this particular news item from about a year and half ago. Rest in Peace, Dorcas Reilly

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...ole-180970635/


In 1955, Dorcas was working as a supervisor at the home economics department of a Campbell’s test kitchen in Camden, New Jersey, when she was tasked with creating a recipe for a feature that would appear in the Associated Press. The recipe had to be based on ingredients that any home cook would have on hand, including Campbell’s mushroom soup and green beans.
Oh, that was very cool. She was born the same year as my mom. Thanks for sharing the link!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-26-2020, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,563 posts, read 3,922,390 times
Reputation: 19809
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I remember my mother putting on makeup at around 4:30 every afternoon. She had very sparse eyebrows, so I watched while she penciled them in.
Same here. I also inherited my mother's eyebrows, so I have to pencil them from the mid brow onwards. I used to scrounge through the trash can to get my mother's makeup discards before I was deemed old enough to wear makeup. Maybe that's why I ended up working for a cosmetics company later on.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2020, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,563 posts, read 3,922,390 times
Reputation: 19809
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohhwanderlust View Post
I'm guessing more no-nonsense foods, like gruel and liver and onions.
Gruel??? Who are you thinking of, Ebenezer Scrooge? In my house liver and onions was popular, as long as my Dad wasn't home for dinner (he often missed dinner for late sales calls). I still like liver and onions to this day but don't eat it as much due to the high cholesterol in the liver, plus it really tastes best with nice buttery mashed potatoes which I definitely don't need to eat. And I have never eaten gruel in my life. Nor did my Mom, even though she was a really poor child.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2020, 05:26 PM
 
11,300 posts, read 7,315,031 times
Reputation: 30051
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
Gruel??? Who are you thinking of, Ebenezer Scrooge? In my house liver and onions was popular, as long as my Dad wasn't home for dinner (he often missed dinner for late sales calls). I still like liver and onions to this day but don't eat it as much due to the high cholesterol in the liver, plus it really tastes best with nice buttery mashed potatoes which I definitely don't need to eat. And I have never eaten gruel in my life. Nor did my Mom, even though she was a really poor child.
What is gruel anyway, watery oatmeal? My parents ate oatmeal but they liked it fairly thick. They also liked Wheat Hearts, which was a hot cereal like Cream of Wheat.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2020, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,728 posts, read 19,316,384 times
Reputation: 14739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeepgrl84 View Post
Such an interesting topic post. I love looking at old pictures from that time. My parents were born in the mid 50s .. the women were more glamorous... Not related to food, but did women really wear dresses daily even for house work?
I'm older (born in '45), but my mom always wore a dress when I was growing up. We were Kansas farmers back then, but my mom was always in a dress. So was my (slightly) older sister. I wouldn't say they were more glamorous; they just didn't wear anything other than dresses. In their later years both wore slacks a lot, but I don't think my mom owned anything other than dresses when I was growing up in the late 40s/early 50s. Mom started wearing slacks mostly after we moved to town in the late 50s.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2020, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,563 posts, read 3,922,390 times
Reputation: 19809
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
What is gruel anyway, watery oatmeal? My parents ate oatmeal but they liked it fairly thick. They also liked Wheat Hearts, which was a hot cereal like Cream of Wheat.
That's exactly it - a thin oatmeal dish. My Mom ate and served us kids oatmeal, which we liked fairly thick as well, but my Dad loved Cream of Wheat. (I always called it Cream of Wallpaper Paste.) I still remember us taking a trip to Florida when I was a kid and stopping at a Southern restaurant for breakfast. They served really thick oatmeal with butter on it instead of milk. This was a revelation to me! I've never gone back to milk on oatmeal since.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2020, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
30,121 posts, read 29,795,087 times
Reputation: 38101
I've heard stories, but I was born in the 1950s.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2020, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,808 posts, read 94,123,097 times
Reputation: 48965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
Same here. I also inherited my mother's eyebrows, so I have to pencil them from the mid brow onwards. I used to scrounge through the trash can to get my mother's makeup discards before I was deemed old enough to wear makeup. Maybe that's why I ended up working for a cosmetics company later on.
wow, I did the same thing. Mom actually was notorious for not emptying her make up drawer, so I would go through it whenever she and daddy left me at home. I would take her almost all used up whatever. Once in awhile she would find something missing and she always knew who had gone through the drawer.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2020, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,808 posts, read 94,123,097 times
Reputation: 48965
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Hats and gloves must have magically disappeared some time around 1970. I have photos of my mom and older sisters all dressed up for Easter around 1967-68, and they have little white gloves on. I was born in 1969 and missed all that. I did find a few old pairs of little white gloves stashed in a drawer when I was growing up, but no one ever wore them. There were two or three of mom's old hats too, but I never saw her wear one of those either.
Guessing it was the early 70s. I have a picture of our youngest daughter in her Easter dress I had made for her in about 1968. She was only 5 years old and yet, had gloves and a hat on.
we moved from No. Ca back to the L.A. area in 1970 and I don't remember the girl wearing hats or gloves even to church after that. I did still wear a hat until mid 1970s.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2020, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,808 posts, read 94,123,097 times
Reputation: 48965
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Sweet potatoes and marshmallows was a 1950s concoction, and I am not sure sweet potatoes were that popular north of the Mason-Dixon Line in the 1940s.

Many popular recipes of the 1950s were made popular by large food companies. I suspect the sweet potato dish was one of those. And I agree, mashed, sweetened sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows is a food no one needs.
We ate sweet potatoes rarely, but always on Thanksgiving and Christmas and always with that sweet stuff. I was raised in So. Ca. It probably was a dish that gained popularity in the 50s, the very early 50s

Nanny Goat: we still have casseroles on occasions. I think they have been around for many years, even before the 40s and 50s. Yes they have died down in popularity in the past couple of decades.

Last edited by nmnita; 05-27-2020 at 06:05 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top