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Old 05-27-2020, 08:40 PM
 
6,381 posts, read 8,854,960 times
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I recommend this book: https://smile.amazon.com/Square-Meal...s%2C348&sr=8-1

It actually gives a culinary history of U.S. from late 1800s through to more modern times including the time period of interest.

Americans of the past were not necessarily healthier eaters. But sometimes increased caloric demand of their lifestyles or fewer options/choices may have led to a healthier result - but not always. Yes, they would eat Cornflakes for breakfast back then. It was interesting to me that in the 1920s or so, urban women would eat ice cream sundaes for lunches, etc., - it was considered a health food, as was soda, etc. Ideas of what is healthy have changed as our knowledge has increased.
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Old 05-27-2020, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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In the 1940s, my dad ate what the Army fed him for a number of years. It was more than he got during the depression. When he entered the Army at the beginning of WWII, he was 5'11" tall and was really skinny. I don't remember the exact weight, but he told me that it was the first time in years that he had the opportunity to eat until he was full. They had dessert, too!
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Old 05-27-2020, 09:19 PM
 
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The food of yesteryear may not have been so processed like it is now, but I don't think we would have considered it healthy. It was mostly carbs and fat except in the summer when fresh fruit and vegetables would be available. Then came canned vegetables and I don't think frozen vegetables were around much before the late 60s/ early 70s. As a kid, I grew up with canned peas and that was our "vegetable' for supper during the winter. My father told stories about how he would take 2 buttered rolls for lunch for school and of course, how he walked 9 miles each way in the blizzard to get there.

Mushy peas from the UK, aka Exorcist vomit, has become an exotic import for millenials
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Old 05-27-2020, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
15,815 posts, read 11,555,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mingna View Post
I ate at a Polish restaurant not too long ago, and was served a lard spread - instead of butter- with my complimentary bread. It looked to consist solely of pork lard.
Yes, that diet is more of a detriment for today’s lifestyle...
We were misled about fat being "evil."

FAT IS HEALTHY
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...olesterol.aspx
The latest science suggests healthy fats (saturated and unsaturated fats from whole food, animal, and plant sources) should comprise anywhere from 50 to 85 percent of your overall energy intake.
"There has never been solid evidence for the idea that these [saturated] fats cause disease. We only believe this to be the case because nutrition policy has been derailed over the past half-century by a mixture of personal ambition, bad science, politics, and bias."
https://www.usnews.com/news/articles...-you-after-all
[R]esearchers wrote in JAMA Internal Medicine, that the sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to downplay links between sugar and heart disease, and instead play up the emerging science about saturated fat as a more likely contributor to heart disease problems than sugar.
. . . [expletive deleted!] . . .

There are essential proteins.
There are essential fatty acids (fat).
There are no “essential” carbohydrates.
. . .
Carb-Loaded, a film
. . . You can be trim and fit, but slowly dying from carbs . . .
https://youtu.be/lBb5TFxj1S0


>> Americans are victims of a public policy and propaganda campaign that resulted in a change in diet, a rise in sickness and disease, and an increased burden. <<


FAT is not the bad guy. Never was.
CARBS (refined) are the problem.
. . .
There are no “essential” carbohydrates.
. . .
Folks DID eat better in the 1930s - 1950s, especially if they avoided the replacements like margarine for butter, etc.
I can recall when sugar was replaced with high fructose corn syrup in the 1960s-70s. A jump in obesity followed. Coincidence?
Many staple foods have had HFC replace the fat - allegedly to be "heart healthy". Again, the remedy was worse than the disease.
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Old 05-28-2020, 05:25 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,805 posts, read 94,646,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
I recommend this book: https://smile.amazon.com/Square-Meal...s%2C348&sr=8-1

It actually gives a culinary history of U.S. from late 1800s through to more modern times including the time period of interest.

Americans of the past were not necessarily healthier eaters. But sometimes increased caloric demand of their lifestyles or fewer options/choices may have led to a healthier result - but not always. Yes, they would eat Cornflakes for breakfast back then. It was interesting to me that in the 1920s or so, urban women would eat ice cream sundaes for lunches, etc., - it was considered a health food, as was soda, etc. Ideas of what is healthy have changed as our knowledge has increased.
Sounds like an interesting and fun read, and no, I certainly do not think people used to eat healthier than today, but I also believe what we are eating today and think is healthy, 50 years from now will be considered unhealthy or some of it will. And some of what we are told is unhealthy now will be shown as healthy. It is somewhat a matter of our tastes changing as much as research. It wasn't long ago, most of us remember when eggs were pretty much a NO NO and so was a lot of seafood, especially shrimp. At the same time avocados were too high in fat. Now we are told, by some experts, we should eat them everyday.
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Old 05-28-2020, 07:34 AM
 
11,564 posts, read 7,561,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Sounds like an interesting and fun read, and no, I certainly do not think people used to eat healthier than today, but I also believe what we are eating today and think is healthy, 50 years from now will be considered unhealthy or some of it will. And some of what we are told is unhealthy now will be shown as healthy. It is somewhat a matter of our tastes changing as much as research. It wasn't long ago, most of us remember when eggs were pretty much a NO NO and so was a lot of seafood, especially shrimp. At the same time avocados were too high in fat. Now we are told, by some experts, we should eat them everyday.
This is why many people believe that we should focus on whole foods and traditional foods which have been eaten for centuries around the world, and ignore the "advice" of experts who are being paid to come up with something new and "scientific." There is no way that non-fat yogurt and low-carb bread with "spread" is a healthier breakfast than a couple of eggs and piece of whole wheat toast with butter or avocado.

I saw a recipe yesterday for "healthy cheesecake" which called for low-fat cream cheese, egg substitute, sugar substitute, and non-fat sour cream. Pure crap. How is that even considered food? Non-fat sour cream? When you take the fat away from cream, nothing is left!
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Old 05-28-2020, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
3,706 posts, read 8,968,997 times
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In my kitchen, I have a framed grocery store ad (in Larkspur, CA) from an old newspaper that I found in my grandmother's house 5 decades ago. The newspaper is dated 1920, and it is interesting to see what foods and household staples were available, and what they cost. It is a time capsule. The store's phone number is listed at the top corner, it says "Phone 777". I am sure some things had changed by the 1940s due to availability of refrigerators, so perhaps some frozen foods?

All prices are in cents, nothing is above $1.

Post Toasties, 2 pkgs .15
Post Bran Flakes, 1 pkg .09
Sardines "Wellman" oval, 3 cans .25
Tuna Silver Bar, 2 cans .25
Grape Fruit fancy, 2 cans .25
Coffee "Wellman", 2 lb can .45
Fontana Pastes, 3 pkg .25 (pastes = dried noodles, pasta)
Dog food "Fearless", 4 cans .25

I could go on an on with what is listed. Lots and lots of canned food. Meat, fruit, veggies, fish. Bulk oil and flour, often bring your own container.

My grandmother became a widow with 2 young children in 1919. The 1920s and 1930s depression era was a daily fight for survival for her family, with scarce resources and not much of a social safety net.

When my father was drafted into the Army in 1942, he was age 25, 6' 3" tall and weighed around 160 pounds. If you were to look up statistics and see what the average weight of an Army draftee was in that era and compare with the weight of the average person of the same age and gender today, I think the difference would be shocking.
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Old 05-28-2020, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
29,614 posts, read 20,391,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
One common food eaten by many in the 1940s was something that barely exists today. It was dumplings, made with white flour and a bit of beef-flavored gravy. A cook had to be an expert in mixing the flour just right or the results would be lumpy and unpalatable.
What I ate as dumplings were spoonfuls of biscuit dough dropped into simmering, watery chicken stew. The dumplings rose and cooked in the steam and heat, and they thickened the liquid below.

I’ve read about other sorts of dumplings, and I have eaten spaetzle once.

There are many regional difference in dumplings, I think. But yes, they are old fashioned.
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Old 05-28-2020, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Dessert
6,910 posts, read 3,486,569 times
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Thank you, whoever fixed the title.
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Old 05-29-2020, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,805 posts, read 94,646,253 times
Reputation: 48975
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
This is why many people believe that we should focus on whole foods and traditional foods which have been eaten for centuries around the world, and ignore the "advice" of experts who are being paid to come up with something new and "scientific." There is no way that non-fat yogurt and low-carb bread with "spread" is a healthier breakfast than a couple of eggs and piece of whole wheat toast with butter or avocado.

I saw a recipe yesterday for "healthy cheesecake" which called for low-fat cream cheese, egg substitute, sugar substitute, and non-fat sour cream. Pure crap. How is that even considered food? Non-fat sour cream? When you take the fat away from cream, nothing is left!
couldn't rep you again yet: don't try to serve me that wonderful, healthy cheesecake. I don't eat cheesecake often but when I do I want the real stuff!!!
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