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Old 06-08-2020, 07:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hey teach View Post
My grandparents talked about eating vegetables out of the garden in the summer. Lots of fried stuff: okra, squash, green tomatoes. My grandmother canned green beans and butter beans, tomatoes, pickles. My grandaddy would talk about having tomato sandwiches for lunch every day when tomatoes were ripe. Eggs were big on their table because they had chickens.
Yes, but that's not going to be representative of the country as a whole.

I think the country as a whole ate more beef and pork. More vegetable starches, but less pasta. They had their own processed junk, like Wonder Bread. Vegetables were probably cooked to death, mostly by plain boiling. None of the more cosmopolitan cooking, like with wine and varied spices.
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Old 06-09-2020, 04:32 AM
 
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At least in New England, the food supply chain was more limited and produce hadn’t been genetically engineered to survive shipping from warm climates. Iceberg lettuce was developed in the 1940s and it was tough to ship it before then. Winter produce was things that would survive in the cellar like carrots and cabbage, and canned. Frozen food didn’t catch on until the tin shortage during WW II made canned food scarce.
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Old 06-09-2020, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
Yes, but that's not going to be representative of the country as a whole.

I think the country as a whole ate more beef and pork. More vegetable starches, but less pasta. They had their own processed junk, like Wonder Bread. Vegetables were probably cooked to death, mostly by plain boiling. None of the more cosmopolitan cooking, like with wine and varied spices.
Actually, many families had home gardens, especially during the war years. Many women made jam and canned produce they had grown. In the very early 1950s my dad had a garden, and we lived in the suburbs. Building lots were often bigger than they are today, so it was easier to find room for a garden.
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Old 06-10-2020, 08:06 PM
 
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First McDonald's or second?...in Downey, Ca.

Guessing.
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Old 06-13-2020, 01:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSmithMMXVIII View Post
Was the way Americans ate in the 1930s/1940s completely different than since the 1950's? Some sources say it was basic, more traditional with healthier portions, no GM food, less chemicals. Certainly almost no fast food, at least not in the way we know it since the 50s, and especially the 60s. Anyway, I don't really care when the change started to occur (circa 1954 space age is my bet). What I would like to know is what did the average American in NY or some midwestern farm would eat in, say 1946, and was it different than today? Would mom prep Kellogs with milk for breakfast like today?
There are lots of restaurants that are older than 1940s, and have relatively same menu

Keens Steakhouse . . . Since 1885
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Old 06-14-2020, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
There are lots of restaurants that are older than 1940s, and have relatively same menu

Keens Steakhouse . . . Since 1885
Yep, you are right: I can think of two right off the top of my head and both have pretty much the same foods as they did then: One if Phillie's french dip near downtown Los Angeles and one is a small coffee shop in Tunica, Ms that we opened in 1937.
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Old 06-15-2020, 08:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Yep, you are right: I can think of two right off the top of my head and both have pretty much the same foods as they did then: One if Phillie's french dip near downtown Los Angeles and one is a small coffee shop in Tunica, Ms that we opened in 1937.
If you want to find out what people ate even before the early 1900s


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTUFUcxwzKk
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Old 06-18-2020, 11:04 PM
 
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1940s, after war rationing and shortages, in Midwest.

Mom had a garden, so freas veggies daily Jun-Sept, and enough to put up lasting 4 more months. Then canned storebought, never frozen. Potatoes daily, never rice or pasta except in casserole. Meat expensive and dubious quality.; steak had to be tenderized, like swiss-steak. Bakery bread, but nice like homemade. Wonderbread kidstuff just beginnning to appear, Mom hated it. Dessert always homebaked. Virtually no pre-packaged convenience foods. Except things like spam and pork/beans, which were common.

Families ate together when Mom called, usually 6 on the dot. You sat there until your plate was cleaned up, or bedtime, whichever came first.
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Old 06-19-2020, 05:42 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
1940s, after war rationing and shortages, in Midwest.

Mom had a garden, so freas veggies daily Jun-Sept, and enough to put up lasting 4 more months. Then canned storebought, never frozen. Potatoes daily, never rice or pasta except in casserole. Meat expensive and dubious quality.; steak had to be tenderized, like swiss-steak. Bakery bread, but nice like homemade. Wonderbread kidstuff just beginnning to appear, Mom hated it. Dessert always homebaked. Virtually no pre-packaged convenience foods. Except things like spam and pork/beans, which were common.

Families ate together when Mom called, usually 6 on the dot. You sat there until your plate was cleaned up, or bedtime, whichever came first.
You remember those days just about like I do: we had to eat everything on our plates. We did have rice as a carb and noodles also, but rarely. Almost every night it was some type of potato. We all ate together and yes, at the same time each night. I also remember mom and dad always had coffee for dinner and because they both smoked, they sat at the table when dinner was finished and had the last cup of coffee and a cigarette. Then us older kids would do the dishes.
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Old 06-20-2020, 03:48 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
24,274 posts, read 23,793,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
1940s, after war rationing and shortages, in Midwest.

Mom had a garden, so freas veggies daily Jun-Sept, and enough to put up lasting 4 more months. Then canned storebought, never frozen. Potatoes daily, never rice or pasta except in casserole. Meat expensive and dubious quality.; steak had to be tenderized, like swiss-steak. Bakery bread, but nice like homemade. Wonderbread kidstuff just beginnning to appear, Mom hated it. Dessert always homebaked. Virtually no pre-packaged convenience foods. Except things like spam and pork/beans, which were common.

Families ate together when Mom called, usually 6 on the dot. You sat there until your plate was cleaned up, or bedtime, whichever came first.
Wow, did you grow up in my neighborhood? Same as my family. People had gardens back then. They worked in them on the weekends and after they got out of work. So--fresh vegetables in summer and then they were canned for the winter. Potatoes every day. If there was rice, it was for rice pudding dessert.

Wonderbread or other local brands. Some people stored apples, carrots, and potatoes in the basement so they could have them all winter. Our vegetables came out of a can in winter. Canned vegetables tasted bland. Canned spinach, canned beans, succotash (yuck), canned peas, canned corn. Meats weren't too good. We had hamburgers, meatloaf, tough sirloin steak, fish if your dad had caught some, oysters. Macaroni and cheese was the only thing we used pasta for. Velveeta cheese was in or on a lot of things.
Sunday dinner at 1pm was great though--roast beef, roast leg of lamb and all the trimmings, like a Thanksgiving dinner minus the turkey.

Our junk food was Hostess cupcakes, ice cream once in a while, fudgsicles and popsicles, soda at a birthday party or a picnic. We had packaged food like Ritz crackers and saltines. Some cakes were made from a mix but most were home made. Pies were home made, loads of pies of all kinds. All desserts were home made except chocolate pudding from a box that you cooked with milk.

Families ate together when Mom called, usually 6 on the dot. You sat there until your plate was cleaned up, or bedtime, whichever came first. Perfect! I don't know HOW many times I sat there until my mashed potatoes turned black!
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