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Old 06-11-2020, 10:10 AM
 
1,456 posts, read 610,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
memphis and kansas city and austin are about the only places you can get true bbq from anymore .
There are actually several different styles of BBQ, with the four primary types being Texas, Kansas City, Memphis, and Carolina style (with at least three variants on this last). Other areas, including Alabama and California, claim their own unique approaches. There is no “true bbq,” just personal preference.

I’ve had excellent examples of all four main regional styles, both in their native area and beyond. Have had worthy BBQ in states like California, New York, Illinois, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Georgia, and Florida, for example.
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Old 06-11-2020, 10:16 AM
 
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After it became “shredded pork.”
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Old 06-11-2020, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
33,911 posts, read 62,891,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
memphis and kansas city and austin are about the only places you can get true bbq from anymore .
You're saying this from South Carolina?
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Old 06-11-2020, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
6,003 posts, read 7,207,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman1 View Post
There are just so many different angles to "barbeque." Or is it "barbecue"?

I lived 18 years in Memphis, and I usually ate Q about every other day. And in all those years, I never had any brisket or BBQ beef. It wasn't on our diets.

We took the table for 12 at the foot of the basement steps at the Rendezvous every Friday night for years. Back then, the ribs were $1.75 for small and $2.75 for large plates. Beer was $1.75 for a 4 glass pitcher, and a 4" thick ham and cheese sandwich was $.75. That was 1968-1972.

I long for those days. And I loved when barbeque was pork shoulders cooked over smoldering coals all night long. I also liked when pork was a fatty meat producing the best flavored smoke. Today's pork is too lean, too white and it's cooked over hybrid natural gas pits with 2-3 wood logs.

I'm still in search of superlative barbeque pork. I seldom get it because the great cooks like Gridley's and Willinghams and John Wills are no longer in business. The great cooks are often very poor restaurant owners.
Yep, being able to make great food and being able to run a profitable business can be two different things...actually, that same issue can be applied to many other professions as well- the fact that you can excel in one area does not automatically mean that you will excel in the other.

I make a pretty good pulled pork. I usually use the butt portion of the shoulder (AKA 'Boston Butt') rather than the fattier (and cheaper 'pork picnic'). I slather it with yellow mustard before I put the rub on and use an off-set smoker with a tray of water under the butt. I never wrap it in foil and never put it in a cooler as some recipes call for. It goes for about 11 hours and gets pulled apart immediately after, no need for 'meat claws', it's so tender that two forks do the job right quick. Then I mix in some bbq sauce- I'm partial to Sweet Baby Ray's but once in a while I'll use something different for a change of pace.

Any kind of meat here almost always gets grilled or smoked, with only a few exceptions...and that goes year-round, even in Winter when the temps are well below zero.

Sometimes I think I'd like to open my own restaurant...but then I wonder if I'd be able to make it profitable, as noted above.
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Old 06-11-2020, 10:50 AM
 
1,417 posts, read 422,734 times
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Discussing bbq is like discussing religion

Each region is going to have their own creation story and say it is the only 'truth'.

Heat, smoke, meat, spices - done right then it's bbq and that is my truth.
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:05 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,719 posts, read 495,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bachslunch View Post
There are actually several different styles of BBQ, with the four primary types being Texas, Kansas City, Memphis, and Carolina style (with at least three variants on this last). Other areas, including Alabama and California, claim their own unique approaches. There is no “true bbq,” just personal preference.

I’ve had excellent examples of all four main regional styles, both in their native area and beyond. Have had worthy BBQ in states like California, New York, Illinois, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Georgia, and Florida, for example.
True BBQ, no matter the region, style or meat, involves wood smoke. It can't be done in a crock pot. Whatever cooker you use, it requires wood smoke, either full logs, splits, 1/2 splits, chunks, chips, discs, rendered down coals or pellets.
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
9,705 posts, read 7,317,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I grew up in SC upstate where BBQ was a way of life. And BBQ meant whole hog cooked over a pit, not a smoker. It was served three ways -- sliced, chopped, or minced. Chopped was the most popular because it mixed all parts of the hog into one blend into bite size pieces perfect for a sandwich.

All that time not once did any of those old men who did the cooking call it "pulled pork." When did pulled pork become the thing? To me the meat is somewhat mushy and lacks flavor. Like it's been steamed rather than BBQ'd.
Only in the Carolinas does the term "BBQ" refer to smoked pork generally chopped or minced exclusively and served with sauce. Elsewhere it can refer to chicken, beef, mutton, pork, etc, slow smoked and served with bbq sauce.

Elsewhere it refers to any slow smoked meat with a number of different sauce styles; be it tomato based, brown sugary tomato base, vinegar base, etc...

Pulled Pork refers to a shredded pork shoulder, often smoked and served with sauce (what I'd call BBQ) but plenty of other preparations don't involve much that I'd call BBQ. I've had pulled pork sandwiches and whatnot that weren't bbq at all.
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,868 posts, read 31,425,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I grew up in SC upstate where BBQ was a way of life. And BBQ meant whole hog cooked over a pit, not a smoker. It was served three ways -- sliced, chopped, or minced. Chopped was the most popular because it mixed all parts of the hog into one blend into bite size pieces perfect for a sandwich.

All that time not once did any of those old men who did the cooking call it "pulled pork." When did pulled pork become the thing? To me the meat is somewhat mushy and lacks flavor. Like it's been steamed rather than BBQ'd.
I think once it started showing up on menus outside of the Carolinas! The pulled pork on menus is so different than the chopped bbq I grew up with. And my mom has even changed her chopped bbq to pulled pork!!!

When I was a kid she did a literal chopped bbq, she roasted some pork, chopped it up, and seasoned it with vinegar and pepper flakes. Now she does a diluted bbq sauce/vinegar mix with the chili flakes.
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,868 posts, read 31,425,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
I made a 'BBQ' 10lb meatloaf to feed 10 Boy Scouts. 1/2 ground seasoned pork and 1/2 ground beef, mixed with diced tomatoes, spices, onion and other stuff. Cooked over coals with chunks of hickory tossed in with the top off for until the water boiled off and the smoke would get in it.. Slather it with homemade BBQ sauce, cover and slow cook.

They plowed it under in record time.

It's a massive dutch oven- over twice normal size.
Growing up my mom always put bbq sauce on meatloaf. I thought that was the normal way. Boy was I wrong when I had meatloaf elsewhere covered with ketchup. I just about hurled. Gross!!! I don't eat meatloaf unless it comes from my mom.
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Actually, you want to go to places like Palestine or Wylie, TX or Blue Mound, KS to get better barbecue than in the cities. I'm equally sure there are fantastic pits in NC, all through the South, and so on, I just don't know where they are.
We grew up eating BBQ from this place: Scott's in Hemingway, SC. This was the real deal. https://carolinas.eater.com/2016/6/1...-que-hemingway

And I can't remember which places we went to when visiting my mom's family. I think it was Moore's BBQ, but I might be wrong. But it was a bigger place, not like Scott's.
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Old 06-11-2020, 02:19 PM
 
7,724 posts, read 3,644,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
While the standard modern English spelling of the word is barbecue, variations including barbeque and truncations such as bar-b-q or BBQ may also be found. The spelling barbeque is given in Merriam-Webster and the Oxford Dictionaries as a variant.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbecue

The q is said to come from the French term barbe à queue (translation: "whisker to tail") and was one of the many spelling variations that arose long before someone decided to officially add the cooking method to the dictionary.
https://www.tastingtable.com/cook/na...beque-spelling
Well, who are you going to believe, some descriptive dictionaries whose editors think it's their job to describe how people misspell things, or J. Frank Dobie?


yeah, the "Q" is "said" to come from this or that, but it comes from people misspelling the word. Then someone else made up an excuse rather than admitting they didn't know how to spell the word.
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