U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-17-2020, 08:53 AM
 
3,245 posts, read 3,244,259 times
Reputation: 3953

Advertisements

My Black and Decker Infrawave oven is used every day for a variety of purposes. It toasts, broils and bakes with light-generated heat. Most frequently we use it to crisp up things we cook in the microwave. We love it so much that when I found out that it had been discontinued, I ordered a back-up that has been sitting in a closet for at least five years. A lot of people didn't like them, but we would find ourselves hard-pressed without it, especially in the summer when we don't like turning on the gas oven for cornbread, cookies, baked chicken or macaroni, etc. The only thing I don't like about it is that it is too small. Because the food is so close to the element, I usually cover it with foil to prevent overbrowning until the last few minutes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-17-2020, 09:21 AM
 
1,072 posts, read 211,635 times
Reputation: 1787
What several others said, sharp knife and skills to keep it that way.


Far as gadgets, pressure cooker would top list. No more efficent way to cook. The old stovetop cast versions last forever, or at least as long as you can get new gasket (there were some really old ones that didnt need gasket). No idea on the new computerized plastic ones, lower pressure and digital display, what could ever go wrong with that....


I have an ancient electric skillet that gets used surprisingly often. One of the old practical ones with the high sides and dome lid. No idea if you can still buy one new or not. Since its simple practical design without computer display that can last decades, probably not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
26,451 posts, read 17,072,963 times
Reputation: 40280
Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
What several others said, sharp knife and skills to keep it that way.


Far as gadgets, pressure cooker would top list. No more efficent way to cook. The old stovetop cast versions last forever, or at least as long as you can get new gasket (there were some really old ones that didnt need gasket). No idea on the new computerized plastic ones, lower pressure and digital display, what could ever go wrong with that....


I have an ancient electric skillet that gets used surprisingly often. One of the old practical ones with the high sides and dome lid. No idea if you can still buy one new or not. Since its simple practical design without computer display that can last decades, probably not.
I used stovetop PCs for decades. I can assure you that electric PCs like the Instant Pot work very well. Nothing has gone wrong with mine. I bought an IP about 2 1/2 years ago, and after a few months of use, I donated my old Fagor. I would never go back to a stovetop PC, just as I would never replace my KA stand mixer for a Sunbeam Mixmaster.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 01:11 PM
 
7,648 posts, read 3,605,936 times
Reputation: 21775
Well two and a half years and "nothing has gone wrong" isn't exactly a long term reliability test for consumer-grade electronics and plastic construction.


The Kitchenaid mixer is not an apropos comparison as it's all metal and has no unnecessary computerized controls.


How to make anything less reliable? Add software. Still too reliable? Add touchscreens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,500 posts, read 20,067,821 times
Reputation: 9824
The most versatile and used item in the kitchen is probably the chef's knife.

As for kitchen appliances/gadgets, the old Kitchen Aid mixer made by Hobart (not one of the new ones) is probably a bombproof workhorse. Has all the attachments I can find for it like the meat grinder, noodle maker, sausage stuffer, pasta plates, shredder, etc. It gets used for making bread several times a week, mayo about once a week, whipped potatoes, egg whites, puddings, etc. Plus noodles get made about every month. Sausage gets made when pigs invade the garden. It's a pretty handy item.

There's also a supply of bomb proof cast iron pans. The best ones have 'Griswald' stamped on the bottom as well as some older Wagner pans. A new cast iron pan can be made better if you have an air grinder or a regular sander if you're willing to take longer to sand it flat, but these old cast iron pans started out with better machining and are by now seasoned and as slick as teflon.

There's also a 40 quart pressure cooker from I'm not sure when but the knobs are made of Bakelite. As well as a stand 'ricer' for making steamed fruits into sauces. Those two items don't get used all that often, but they are complete workhorses when they do get used. Couple bushels of apples? No problem. Oh, that process of turning bushels of fruit into canned fruits or fruit butter starts with the enormous Revere Ware copper bottomed stewpot.

There's also a spatula which has a really thin and flexible stainless steel blade. The handle has been re-riveted back on several times and it's time to do it again, but I've not seen another spatula with that nice of a blade.

During summers, the 'Hollywood Salad Maker' gets a lot of use. It's kinda a food chopper in the 'spinning blades of death' sorta style but amazingly enough it doesn't eat fingers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 01:41 PM
 
587 posts, read 174,958 times
Reputation: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
What several others said, sharp knife and skills to keep it that way.


Far as gadgets, pressure cooker would top list. No more efficent way to cook. The old stovetop cast versions last forever, or at least as long as you can get new gasket (there were some really old ones that didnt need gasket). No idea on the new computerized plastic ones, lower pressure and digital display, what could ever go wrong with that....


I have an ancient electric skillet that gets used surprisingly often. One of the old practical ones with the high sides and dome lid. No idea if you can still buy one new or not. Since its simple practical design without computer display that can last decades, probably not.
Instant Pot is a pressure cooker.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 02:18 PM
 
1,405 posts, read 448,168 times
Reputation: 3885
Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
What several others said, sharp knife and skills to keep it that way.


Far as gadgets, pressure cooker would top list. No more efficent way to cook. The old stovetop cast versions last forever, or at least as long as you can get new gasket (there were some really old ones that didnt need gasket). No idea on the new computerized plastic ones, lower pressure and digital display, what could ever go wrong with that....


I have an ancient electric skillet that gets used surprisingly often. One of the old practical ones with the high sides and dome lid. No idea if you can still buy one new or not. Since its simple practical design without computer display that can last decades, probably not.
I agree with the old-school pressure cooker. My Mirro's on my stove jiggling away as I type this!

I have zero interest in an InstaPot as I already have and use a pressure cooker (and a slow cooker) that has seen frequent use since the early 1960s, if not earlier. I cook different things in it than my grandparents did as well as some familiar favorites (Indian food surely was not on either of their radars!), but the ease and efficiency of using it have not changed. It's also nice to have an extra four quart sauce pot hanging around when I need one just by leaving off the lid. Put on the lid without the gasket, and it's a pot with a built-in strainer.

Somehow, with the way that consumer electronics are made these days, I doubt that an Instapot from circa 2020 will still be in regular service (or in service at all) in 2070. If I didn't already have a pressure cooker, I'd consider one, but I'm happy with my old work horse.

A pair of good, sharp knives (paring and French) and a well-seasoned cast iron pan--those are the things that I would never want to do without. I can make just about anything that I'd like to make for a workaday meal using that pan from breakfast to dessert to just about everything in-between.

Last edited by Formerly Known As Twenty; 06-17-2020 at 02:26 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Somewhere amidst the cornfields of Illinois
776 posts, read 206,910 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I used stovetop PCs for decades. I can assure you that electric PCs like the Instant Pot work very well. Nothing has gone wrong with mine. I bought an IP about 2 1/2 years ago, and after a few months of use, I donated my old Fagor. I would never go back to a stovetop PC, just as I would never replace my KA stand mixer for a Sunbeam Mixmaster.
I agree with most of your post, as we too have been using PC's for decades, and had used our Fagor for 15 years or better before buying an IP. But we kept our old Fagor for the simple reason that if and when the power goes out we still can have a quick nutritious meal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 03:32 PM
 
39 posts, read 7,431 times
Reputation: 124
The wife.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2020, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
26,451 posts, read 17,072,963 times
Reputation: 40280
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Well two and a half years and "nothing has gone wrong" isn't exactly a long term reliability test for consumer-grade electronics and plastic construction.


The Kitchenaid mixer is not an apropos comparison as it's all metal and has no unnecessary computerized
It is if it has been in continual use. And it has.

I think the KA mixer is an apt comparison. The newer units are supposedly not made like tho older ones. I’ve heard complaints about power. Mine dates from about 2000, though, and it works quite well.

The old pressure cookers were built like tanks. I bought one at a garage sale back in the ‘90s, I think. It was made of cast aluminum, like my mom’s had been. But I replaced it with a basic Fagor about 20 years ago. It was very serviceable, made of stainless, and had A newer type pressure regulator. But my IP works better.

I realize that there is supposed to be a difference in psi numbers in the electric pots, but I use an all purpose PC cookbook with no problems. I use the cooking times given in the book, all the time.

In all honesty, long life in an appliance is not necessarily a good goal. If something comes along that works better, it is fine to opt fir the thing that works better. And the IP simply works better than a stovetop PC.

It is certainly more versatile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top