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Old 06-15-2020, 03:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
42,175 posts, read 60,990,009 times
Reputation: 98882

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankAce View Post
I read that it's not good to cook with boiled tap water. So I decided not to use tap water to make instant mashed potatoes. However, I've come across a dilemma regarding cooking spaghetti. I don't know if I could use bottled water to make a pot of spaghetti because too much water is required.

Is the tap water heavily contaminated where you live? Or maybe you have rusted, corroded pipes in your home?
Other than that I don't see any reason not to use tap water to cook. When you're cooking, it boils, no? All minor contaminants will be deactivated.
Now, just for a great taste - I don't drink tap water or make drinks with it, but that's just my personal preference. Most people drink it directly from the tap and not many complain.
The water used in restaurants and bars (except you order bottled ) is a tap water too. But in most cases that bottled water (except stated it's coming from somewhere else) it's nothing else but a tap water - just perhaps little filtered and bottled. Hope you know that.

If you fear your tap water so much, why don't you use water filter? Portable (like Britta) or whole house system.

https://www.nycfoodpolicy.org/10-fac...rinking-water/
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:10 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
42,175 posts, read 60,990,009 times
Reputation: 98882
From OP's posting history I "assume" he lives in NYC. Therefore please read my link ^^^
I understand his concerns but not sure what to think. There are many very conflicting statements on the net:
https://www1.nyc.gov/site/greenyc/ta...tap-water.page
https://patch.com/new-york/new-york-...ng-water-study
https://www.thrillist.com/lifestyle/...s-quality-test
https://tappwater.co/us/can-you-drink-nyc-tap-water/
etc....
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:17 PM
 
9,682 posts, read 3,643,358 times
Reputation: 22223
I would think that if your water is generally considered safe, tap water is fine.


That said, if you live in Flint Michigan, DON'T use the tap water.
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Alabama!
5,897 posts, read 16,429,582 times
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We have excellent quality tap water. I do not hesitate to use it for cooking OR drinking....unboiled.
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:46 PM
Status: "Daring to hope" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
62,992 posts, read 59,808,037 times
Reputation: 75934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Wait...what do you mean?

Do you mean using water than has been boiled at some previous time in order to cook something?

or

not boiling the water as you cook whatever it is?

What reason did they give for not using boiled tap water? Safety? Boiled water is generally considered "safe" in terms of microorganisms. Heavy metals, industrial pollutants not so much. Depends on what it is. Taste? Boiled water can taste flat. BUT, if you add anything to that water the taste will change anyway. As others have said, some tap water tastes worse due to mineral or organic content. Sulfur, calcium, iron, rust, tannin, copper, etc. That can affect the taste of what you cook, even the temperature at which the water will boil. Boiling it could modify the taste of those natural ingredients or it could cause impurities to settle to the bottom of the pot. You could just pour almost all of the water off the top of the pot to avoid the residue.

I would NEVER waste that much bottled water using it to boil pasta! I usually install RO filters as my homes are usually on wells with really really hard iron-rich water. I don't even use filtered water to boil it! Straight from the tap, into the pot, and on to the stove.
That was my question, too.
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:49 PM
Status: "Daring to hope" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
62,992 posts, read 59,808,037 times
Reputation: 75934
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
From OP's posting history I "assume" he lives in NYC. Therefore please read my link ^^^
I understand his concerns but not sure what to think. There are many very conflicting statements on the net:
https://www1.nyc.gov/site/greenyc/ta...tap-water.page
https://patch.com/new-york/new-york-...ng-water-study
https://www.thrillist.com/lifestyle/...s-quality-test
https://tappwater.co/us/can-you-drink-nyc-tap-water/
etc....
Yes, traditionally, NYC tap water has been known to be some of the best. I watched a documentary on it with in the last year or two. It is fascinating how the water is brought down through the tunnels from fifty miles upstate and then how it is processed through the different plants and tested and literally tasted for quality.

When there are problems with contaminants in the water, it usually has to do with old pipes and plumbing that should be replaced.
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:52 PM
 
1,558 posts, read 1,232,082 times
Reputation: 3702
Some bottled water probably came from the tap if the truth was known.
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Old 06-15-2020, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
4,878 posts, read 2,213,144 times
Reputation: 12786
Quote:
Originally Posted by bagster View Post
Some bottled water probably came from the tap if the truth was known.
It all comes from taps. You don't want to drink untreated water, even from a crystal pure stream.
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Old 06-15-2020, 08:14 PM
 
29,151 posts, read 35,565,299 times
Reputation: 38468
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankAce View Post
I read that it's not good to cook with boiled tap water. So I decided not to use tap water to make instant mashed potatoes. However, I've come across a dilemma regarding cooking spaghetti. I don't know if I could use bottled water to make a pot of spaghetti because too much water is required.
That's crazy. I've cooked with tap water for nearly 50 years.
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Old 06-16-2020, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Guadalajara, MX
7,491 posts, read 3,644,311 times
Reputation: 14295
Hah I'm currently living in Mexico, which is almost the cliche "don't drink the water" place, yet I cook with boiled tap water all the time. Have done same in living in other developing countries.


From https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/...pdf?sequence=1
Quote:
Enteric bacteria, protozoa and viruses in liquids are sensitive to inactivation at temperatures below 100 °C. Thermal inactivation has been examined in water, sewage, milk and other liquids at temperatures close to those used for pasteurization (e.g. 63 °C for 30 minutes, 72 °C for 15 seconds) and in hot water (about 60 °C). Only a few studies have examined thermal inactivation in liquids at temperatures approaching 100 °C.

The results of these investigations, which are summarized in Table 1, show that bacteria are particularly sensitive to heat, and rapid kills – less than 1 minute per log (90%) reduction – are achieved at temperatures above 65 °C. Viruses are inactivated at temperatures between 60 °C and 65 °C, but more slowly than bacteria. However, as shown for poliovirus and hepatitis A, as temperatures increase above 70 °C, a greater than 5 log inactivation (99.999% reduction) is achieved in less than 1 minute. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are inactivated in less than 1 minute once temperatures exceed 70 °C. The data for Giardia cysts are more limited, but inactivation at temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 70 °C has been reported.
Quote:
Based on these results, it is considered that the process of heating water to a rolling boil, as recommended in the WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality (WHO, 2011), is sufficient to inactivate pathogenic bacteria, viruses and protozoa. After the water has reached a rolling boil, it should be removed from the heat, allowed to cool naturally, without the addition of ice, and protected from post-treatment recontamination during storage. If turbid water needs to be clarified for aesthetic reasons, this should be done before boiling.

Unless your community is known to have problems with heavy metals in the water distribution system, boiling should do it. If you do have heavy metals you need to buy bottled water, move somewhere else, or go full-on Kentucky and set up a distillery in your garage.
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