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Old 06-15-2020, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,911 posts, read 31,447,436 times
Reputation: 27774

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I think many people here end up getting "non-native" ingredients, intending to recreate a recipe from a cuisine that is not their "native" one, and then do not know how to use that ingredient out of context.

So let's talk about these ingredients, and how you use them in other types of dishes.

I bought tahini for hummus, but found it is a good sub for peanut butter. I use with miso in a salad dressing, on toast, and in oatmeal.

When I looked at the ingredients for Chinese 5-spice and Indian Garam Masala, I realized they are super similar to pumpkin pie spice. So I use them in oatmeal, cookies, and hot chocolate. And one of my faves is on roasted sweet potatoes!

A few months ago I got a yuzu hot sauce from Trader Joes - it s a Japanese hot sauce that is spicy, salty and citrusy. . And turns out it is really really versatile. The yuzu tastes like a combo of lemon, lime, and tangerine. I have added it to chili, Mexican food when there wasn't enough salsa. On beans, in salad, on moroccan inspired dishes. Turns out it almost works on everything.

So spill the beans - how do you use those ingredients out of context.
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Old 06-17-2020, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
10,801 posts, read 9,490,711 times
Reputation: 23915
I mix kimchi (not the cabbage) with butter and pour it over popcorn.

It's the best popcorn I've ever eaten.

http://www.pacificeastwest.com/613196070056.html
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Old 06-17-2020, 09:58 AM
 
14,818 posts, read 25,291,621 times
Reputation: 21442
I use Thai fish sauce as a seasoning for many dishes including omelettes and meat loaf. If I don't have fish sauce, worcestershire sauce performs pretty much the same function.
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Old 06-17-2020, 10:09 AM
 
1,578 posts, read 812,839 times
Reputation: 1773
I agree with Garam masala for any apple dessert.
I use epazote with all bean dishes, not just Mexican. Indian, cassoulet, bean based soups like lentil.
Soy sauce as a sub for salt for grain soups like mushroom barley.
Panko is versatile.
Coconut oil and ghee in non Indian - even baking.
Chinese fish sauce for salt with depth of flavor.
Korean ginger tea in my yogurt as a sweetener.
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Old 06-17-2020, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Guadalajara, MX
7,550 posts, read 3,674,972 times
Reputation: 14356
We dip tortillas in Thai green chicken curry. It's usually just the leftovers of the curry when there is no more chicken or veggies.

It's actually similar to how in Thailand/Malaysia sometimes you see curry served with roti instead of rice, but it's just Mexican tortillas instead.
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Old 06-19-2020, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,977 posts, read 88,861,076 times
Reputation: 46783
I use several ingredients in ways that have nothing to do with the recipes you would expect them to be used for: mostly Asian spices and sauces: I use soy sauce in lots of other ways: I do do the same bottled Asian sauces and bok choy is great in green salad. It adds a wonderful crunch. Home made salsa is great added to veggies or meats as long as you do not use too much. I guess I could go on and on. OH yes, nothing is better on fruit salad than a dressing made with a rum or brandy sauce. Liquor as we know, is not just for drinking.
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Old 06-19-2020, 07:13 AM
 
1,003 posts, read 429,028 times
Reputation: 3552
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I think many people here end up getting "non-native" ingredients, intending to recreate a recipe from a cuisine that is not their "native" one, and then do not know how to use that ingredient out of context.

So let's talk about these ingredients, and how you use them in other types of dishes.

I bought tahini for hummus, but found it is a good sub for peanut butter. I use with miso in a salad dressing, on toast, and in oatmeal.

When I looked at the ingredients for Chinese 5-spice and Indian Garam Masala, I realized they are super similar to pumpkin pie spice. So I use them in oatmeal, cookies, and hot chocolate. And one of my faves is on roasted sweet potatoes!

A few months ago I got a yuzu hot sauce from Trader Joes - it s a Japanese hot sauce that is spicy, salty and citrusy. . And turns out it is really really versatile. The yuzu tastes like a combo of lemon, lime, and tangerine. I have added it to chili, Mexican food when there wasn't enough salsa. On beans, in salad, on moroccan inspired dishes. Turns out it almost works on everything.

So spill the beans - how do you use those ingredients out of context.

This kind of thinking would make a great cookbook or cooking show! Really, it would.
Everyone is looking for a little twist on their everyday food so using an ingredient purchased for one recipe that just sits there would be hugely exciting to people who cook.

Yesterday I used pomegranate syrup in 2 different ways: flavored stovetop pudding with it (made with milk and cornstarch, no baking) and later used it for sauteed chicken dinner with coconut cream and ginger.

My niece by marriage left the pomegranate syrup after visiting and cooking a Persian dish and it's been sitting there. Really delicious, would also make nice granita and other desserts.
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Old 06-19-2020, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,911 posts, read 31,447,436 times
Reputation: 27774
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkletwinkle22 View Post
This kind of thinking would make a great cookbook or cooking show! Really, it would.
Everyone is looking for a little twist on their everyday food so using an ingredient purchased for one recipe that just sits there would be hugely exciting to people who cook.

Yesterday I used pomegranate syrup in 2 different ways: flavored stovetop pudding with it (made with milk and cornstarch, no baking) and later used it for sauteed chicken dinner with coconut cream and ginger.

My niece by marriage left the pomegranate syrup after visiting and cooking a Persian dish and it's been sitting there. Really delicious, would also make nice granita and other desserts.
Oh I love the pomegranate syrup - makes for a yummy salad dressing. And I have used it to make another middle eastern spread: muhurama (I know that is not the right spelling). But it is a roasted pepper spread with walnuts, pomegranate molasses, garlic, and herbs. So yummy. I saw a variation with roasted sweet potatoes that sounds amazing too.

I got it to make a pomegranate chicken dish inspired by a local restaurant. That isn’t much more than braised chicken with the syrup, sumac, onions, lemon juice.
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Old 06-19-2020, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Kaneohe, HI
5,168 posts, read 5,509,122 times
Reputation: 6538
Some people like ketchup, A-1, or mustard with their steak. Others just want some seasoning. I love blue cheese with a ribeye steak, then I added in some shoyu (soy sauce) for a new twist. A slice of ribeye with a bit of blue cheese dipped in shoyu is delicious.
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Old 06-21-2020, 05:26 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,727 posts, read 498,179 times
Reputation: 4215
How are you defining "native"? Many ingredients used around the world aren't native to each cuisine. Potatoes, corn, tomatoes and chili peppers aren't native to many countries that use them.
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