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Old 01-20-2023, 07:55 AM
 
33 posts, read 39,456 times
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I have collected much information through this thread
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Old 01-20-2023, 10:36 AM
 
Location: A coal patch in Pennsyltucky
10,375 posts, read 10,714,755 times
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I'm currently drinking Cafe Ole from H-E-B. I've tried many of the brands on the list here and the H-E-B brand is better than most. The problem is H-E-B stores are only located in Texas. It currently costs $7.91 for a 12 oz. bag.
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Old 01-24-2023, 01:36 PM
 
749 posts, read 424,119 times
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I stopped drinking coffee a few years ago. Back then Starbucks showcased coffees from other countries. On one trip to Starbucks, I vividly remember a Central American(CA) country that I am/was intimately familiar (I consumed pounds of their coffee products). I was excited to buy a bag. On the first sip, I could taste that I was duped..."Why this stuff's made in New York City!"
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Old 01-26-2023, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Miami (prev. NY, Atlanta, SF, OC and San Diego)
7,451 posts, read 6,613,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elchevere View Post
Glad to see Intelligentsia up there.

A couple of brands I prefer to any listed are Cubita and Serrano from Cuba and Tonino Lamborghini from Italy.
Need to add Kimbo Italian Roast coffee to my list…..breakfast place I frequent serves it and it has a nice rich bold flavor.

https://www.kimbo.coffee/eu_en/
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Old 01-27-2023, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
20,988 posts, read 28,533,373 times
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Thankfully mine is not on the list. Growing up we had Maxwell house, Folgers, chock full O nuts, and Martinsen's. I drink Newman's own extra bold or I buy the Store brand Extra bold which tastes just as good.
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Old 02-19-2023, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Declezville, CA
16,806 posts, read 40,021,595 times
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Flavor is so subjective. The lowest-rated brand from this article happens to make one of my favorites to use in the Keurig, their Upper West Side dark roast. My daily driver is Caribou Mahogany. My favorite seasonal is the Sbux Holiday Blend, closely followed by the Fall Blend.

My favorite bean to grind for pourovers won't be mentioned here as it's hard enough to find in stock as it is. The estate is limited to only 5000 bags a year for export.
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Old 02-19-2023, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Sector 001
15,949 posts, read 12,336,506 times
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I buy freshly roasted coffee from the local coffee shop that they roast on site. I also bought an inexpensive roaster and some inexpensive green beans on eBay to give my luck at roasting myself but don't want to roast until temps get into the 50s outside.

I drink decaf which is harder to find good beans but it can be done. the nice thing about roasting decaf is you don't get a lot of the chaf because it's removed during the decaf process. This makes it easier to use cheaper roasters.

Good roasts need the proper temperature that rises at a fast enough rate to hit first crack within a specified time period but without overheating the coffee. If it takes too long to hit first crack the coffee will taste burnt. Some people will actually use temperature probes and software to perfect their roasts. Given enough trial and error though that's not necessary. Of course all the commercial roasters have it down to a science.

There's nothing particularly special about a roaster besides the beans they use and how long the coffee sits around on store shelves after roast. The actual roasting process should be the same between roasters it's just a matter of what kind of roast they produce. Some roasters do like to over roast their beans though and have a preference for really dark brews which is not my preference. It should have a roasted date and not an expiration date but most box store beans use expiration dates. It should also be ground right before use.

I prefer light to medium roasts brewed at higher temps...light roast 210 degrees, medium roasts 200 degrees, dark roasts 190 degrees. Most drip Brewers are best for darker roasts because they don't get the coffee warm enough to do lighter roasts. For best results you really do need different temperatures for different roast profiles. I really don't like the taste of dark roasts brewed with boiling water.

The next step is learning more about the beans themselves and finding my favorites and learning about roasting altitudes and origins and stuff like that. Then having different roast profiles with the same beans for example roasting a light roast and then a dark roast from beans of different origins and comparing the end results.

I bought some Hy-Vee decaffeinated ground coffee to try to make cold brew and it tasted like chemicals I could not use the stuff. Cold brew is a different beast and you don't need to use expensive beans for it but they can't taste like chemicals either.

Last edited by sholomar; 02-19-2023 at 08:14 AM..
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Old 02-19-2023, 08:02 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
4,623 posts, read 3,329,794 times
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I understand the removal process to make decaf uses some sort of acid. I didn't like the sound of that. Maybe someone else knows more about that.
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Old 02-19-2023, 03:19 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 1,751,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H8t3rs View Post
I stopped drinking coffee a few years ago. Back then Starbucks showcased coffees from other countries. On one trip to Starbucks, I vividly remember a Central American(CA) country that I am/was intimately familiar (I consumed pounds of their coffee products). I was excited to buy a bag. On the first sip, I could taste that I was duped..."Why this stuff's made in New York City!"
It doesn't matter if the Coffee was made in LA or NYC, raw coffee beans aren't grown in the US. Majority came from South America. What that coffee says is that it's ROASTED in NYC that is not made in NYC. Roasting can be done anywhere. Coffee beans is shipped raw from all countries and they are then roasted locally for freshness.

You need to watch some youtube videos and learn how coffee was made.
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Old 02-25-2023, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Vermont
9,516 posts, read 5,305,192 times
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My daily is Costco Kirkland Columbian although that is often more expensive than Starbucks French Roast (whole bean, also at Costco). If I find it on sale I prefer Peets Major Dickason's. very yummy. dark.
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