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Old 03-02-2024, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Dessert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
I don't understand the love of chicken wings. Putting a bunch of little, gristly bones on the table with a shred of meat on each one, often covered in sticky sauces has no appeal to me. Unlike the OP, boneless wings actually seem worth the effort to me.
I finally figured that out. Wings are for people who like skin and sauce. Definitely not health food.

Ironically, wings used to be cheap because they're all skin and bones. But some culinary entrepreneur figured out how to make them popular, and the price zoomed.
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Old 03-02-2024, 12:03 PM
 
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I have never heard of fried fish stuffed with cheese. That's popular?? Where??

At any rate, that would be a hard pass for me.
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Old 03-02-2024, 01:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
I finally figured that out. Wings are for people who like skin and sauce. Definitely not health food.

Ironically, wings used to be cheap because they're all skin and bones. But some culinary entrepreneur figured out how to make them popular, and the price zoomed.
Are you talking about wing tips?
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Old 03-02-2024, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
So many regional specialties that are considered "popular" in America. Some I have never heard of or wouldn't consider popular at all (split pea soup?).

Anyone who has visited or lives in New Mexico has encountered the question "red or green?" at a restaurant. It refers to red or green chile sauce on your dish, and you can order "Christmas" if you want both. People that choose no sauce because it's "too spicy" will probably get laughed at. It's all about chile in New Mexico.
Hmm, maybe that is regional. Split pea soup is fairly popular, both in vegan form or made with ham. In fact, people who eat Easter hams often use the bone to make soup later that week. It's healthier vegan, though.
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Old 03-02-2024, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by springfieldva View Post
I have never heard of fried fish stuffed with cheese. That's popular?? Where??

At any rate, that would be a hard pass for me.
Same here. I have never figured out the appeal of tuna melts or mac n cheese with tuna added. It just sounds like a clash.
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Old 03-02-2024, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
Funny how regional things are. Growing up ketchup was a child’s condiment. Sugary for little sweet tooth’s. When I was a teen I pretty much stopped using ketchup and went to spicy mustard or fry sauce or chili sauce.

And in WV chow-chow was the relish for hamburgers and hotdogs- made with peppers and you guessed it/ dried mustard, turmeric and vinegar.
Mustard on your burger (beef), though? Again, I can't digest mustard or something, but it doesn't seem as if it "goes with" the taste of beef.

Don't know what "fry sauce" is.
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Old 03-02-2024, 06:32 PM
 
2,041 posts, read 990,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Hmm, maybe that is regional. Split pea soup is fairly popular, both in vegan form or made with ham. In fact, people who eat Easter hams often use the bone to make soup later that week. It's healthier vegan, though.
I personally love split pea soup, but I don't consider it especially popular. Maybe it's regional, as I mentioned. Can't say I've ever been to a restaurant that has split pea soup on the permanent menu. Maybe as a 'soup of the day" special.

When I first saw this thread I interpreted "popular American foods" as stereotypical foods that are found as typical fare from coast to coast: hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza, chicken wings, ice cream, soda, etc. Interesting how it's migrated to regional popular foods, some of which I've never heard of or tried.
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Old 03-02-2024, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
I personally love split pea soup, but I don't consider it especially popular. Maybe it's regional, as I mentioned. Can't say I've ever been to a restaurant that has split pea soup on the permanent menu. Maybe as a 'soup of the day" special.

When I first saw this thread I interpreted "popular American foods" as stereotypical foods that are found as typical fare from coast to coast: hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza, chicken wings, ice cream, soda, etc. Interesting how it's migrated to regional popular foods, some of which I've never heard of or tried.
OK. I do see split pea soup regularly on diner menus (diners are ubiquitous here, and they usually have a "soup of the day" in addition to something standard like chicken noodle). The diner nearest to me has a good lentil soup every Wednesday. Pretty sure split pea is a standard on a different day.

Also, in NYC, in the places that do lunch buffets that include soups, split pea is almost always one of the choices. So yes, maybe it's regional.

But people do think of things as "American" that I wouldn't think of. I once dated a guy who said he was going to make me dinner. He lived here in NJ, but he had grown up in Texas.

Dinner was burritos. I can take or leave Mexican (or Tex-Mex or whatever people like to call it) and it was good enough, but I was startled when he said, "I just had to make this. It's real comfort food to me, the kind of thing my mother would make for us regularly for dinner."

To ME, comfort food was something like a roast beef or meat loaf and mashed potatoes. Not an ethnic food that I never even heard of as a child.

It doesn't even have to be regional. Many years ago, one of my sisters was dating an Italian guy who made spaghetti and meatballs in homemade tomato sauce for the family one day. He had the pot bubbling on the stove, and he grinned and said, "This is what my house smelled like growing up on Sundays." For a moment, I felt sorry for him that he had to eat spaghetti on Sundays instead of a good dinner with meat and potatoes, and then I realized this was a happy memory for him. We ate spaghetti (with sauce from a jar) near the end of the month when the budget was low before Dad got paid again and my mother needed something cheap and filling to feed ten people.
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Old 03-03-2024, 11:05 AM
 
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Seems like everyone is naming foods that are popular in the U.S. but aren't necessarily American dishes.

I can't think of any uniquely American food that I don't like at all, but one very popular thing that everyone but me seems to like is pretzels. Just dry, flavorless bread and I've never understood the appeal. Won't buy them and I would have to be starving to even eat them.
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Old 03-03-2024, 11:18 AM
 
27,169 posts, read 43,857,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
Funny how regional things are. Growing up ketchup was a child’s condiment. Sugary for little sweet tooth’s. When I was a teen I pretty much stopped using ketchup and went to spicy mustard or fry sauce or chili sauce.

And in WV chow-chow was the relish for hamburgers and hotdogs- made with peppers and you guessed it/ dried mustard, turmeric and vinegar.
Ketchup is frowned upon in big cities like NYC or Chicago when talking hot dogs especially and seen as ruination of a perfectly good hot dog. Personally I can't stand its cloying sweetness on an otherwise savory food item.
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