U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Fort Myers - Cape Coral area
 [Register]
Fort Myers - Cape Coral area Lee County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2013, 02:02 PM
 
199 posts, read 463,702 times
Reputation: 228

Advertisements

Sunbabe, it's not impossible. I moved down here last May without ever having set foot in the area and I could not be happier. HOWEVER, I have a job that allows me to work remotely from anywhere in the world where I have access to the Internet, and this was a huge advantage. As for the rest, I did a ton of online research, found a reputable realtor to work with and found a great house to rent. I would tend to agree with the rest on this thread that having employment lined up before you move should be paramount, but your dream is not an impossible one - don't give up on it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-15-2013, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
374 posts, read 698,427 times
Reputation: 365
I didn't mean to be a Debbie Downer... I LOVE Florida as much as the next and wish I could live there...

What is your budget for a place? Do you want to buy or lease? What does your husband do for a living (now in PA) How about your dream job?

I guess if you are going to do it... start looking at job possibilities for the 2 of you, then decide where you will live. When you do decide to move, you can probably bet on a decent rental in a nice area for about 800.00 to 1000.00.

Good luck!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2013, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral, FL
154 posts, read 317,213 times
Reputation: 132
The problem is that no matter what your experience or willingness to take a job, there are very few possibilities here. One of my neighbors who is a college graduate with several years experience cannot even get a job at Publix or Lowes. You would think that anyone could get a minimum wage job but that isn't necessarily the case in this area.

What happens if you move here and are lucky enough to get a job, sell your house, and your husband quits his good job but can't get work here? I don't know your overall situation but I wouldn't even consider leaving everything to chance unless you are willing to accept the fact that this might end in total disaster.

I would spend a bit more time trying to land a job here before moving down; or find a way to make a living on your own, perhaps on the Internet, before even thinking about making the move.

Good luck...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2013, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral, Florida
693 posts, read 1,775,985 times
Reputation: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by xoomer View Post
The problem is that no matter what your experience or willingness to take a job, there are very few possibilities here. One of my neighbors who is a college graduate with several years experience cannot even get a job at Publix or Lowes. You would think that anyone could get a minimum wage job but that isn't necessarily the case in this area.

What happens if you move here and are lucky enough to get a job, sell your house, and your husband quits his good job but can't get work here? I don't know your overall situation but I wouldn't even consider leaving everything to chance unless you are willing to accept the fact that this might end in total disaster.

I would spend a bit more time trying to land a job here before moving down; or find a way to make a living on your own, perhaps on the Internet, before even thinking about making the move.

Good luck...
The reason your neighbor can't get a minimum wage job is precisely because they are a college grad and have experience. Publix and Lowes aren't going to hire someone that is severely overqualified. They aren't billion dollar conglomerates by accident. They hire 20 year olds that will learn it their way, who may be looking for a potential career in the company, not someone who has tons of experience doing it their own way and is looking to make 9 bucks an hour until they find something they really should be doing.

With that said, there are not many jobs, but the ones here are at places like Home Depot, Lowes, Publix, Walmart, some restaurants. It is a service related economy and you should expect to make minimum wage, perhaps a couple cents more or tips unless you are in healthcare or retail/service management.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2013, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral, FL
154 posts, read 317,213 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billythepokerkid View Post
The reason your neighbor can't get a minimum wage job is precisely because they are a college grad and have experience. Publix and Lowes aren't going to hire someone that is severely overqualified. They aren't billion dollar conglomerates by accident. They hire 20 year olds that will learn it their way, who may be looking for a potential career in the company, not someone who has tons of experience doing it their own way and is looking to make 9 bucks an hour until they find something they really should be doing.

With that said, there are not many jobs, but the ones here are at places like Home Depot, Lowes, Publix, Walmart, some restaurants. It is a service related economy and you should expect to make minimum wage, perhaps a couple cents more or tips unless you are in healthcare or retail/service management.
I don't know what the official policy of Lowes or Publix is but when I worked in the financial industry we always tried to hire more qualified people even for the minimum wage jobs. Most people are always looking for a better job but we tried to train and keep them in our system. However, there were two problems with hiring older, more experienced people--they often were harder to train since they had an attitude that they knew everything, and the medical insurance we provided for them cost us a lot more than for an "18 year old". In any case, if you are right about these types of jobs then the OP will definitely have a problem since she is apparently an engineer.

Even in the medical profession it can be hard to get a full time job here. We recently had a physical therapist and an RN come to the house for outpatient treatment and both of them had lost their full time jobs due to the downturn and were now working as independent contractors on a part time basis.

This definitely isn't the place to be looking for work...if you want a job and the beach go to Houston and get a job the same day and visit Galveston beach on the weekends.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2013, 10:19 AM
 
1,299 posts, read 2,010,245 times
Reputation: 245
The upside of hiring older workers is that they are a lot more reliable when it comes to showing up for work and in most cases are more motivated to do a good job.
As far as "knowing everything" I'm sure there are some smart asses out there, on the other hand you could learn something from their expierience.
A very easy way to find good workers of any age is by checking how long they have had previous jobs. Some one that changes jobs every six months is probably not as good a candidate as somebody that had only three jobs in the last twenty years. and simply got laid off because they are old now (this is actually illegal but very hard to prove)]and the cost the company more.

I think many companies make a big mistake when they have those policies, and are Penny wise and Dollar foolish.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral, FL
154 posts, read 317,213 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by equalrightsforeveryone View Post
The upside of hiring older workers is that they are a lot more reliable when it comes to showing up for work and in most cases are more motivated to do a good job.
As far as "knowing everything" I'm sure there are some smart asses out there, on the other hand you could learn something from their expierience.
A very easy way to find good workers of any age is by checking how long they have had previous jobs. Some one that changes jobs every six months is probably not as good a candidate as somebody that had only three jobs in the last twenty years. and simply got laid off because they are old now (this is actually illegal but very hard to prove)]and the cost the company more.

I think many companies make a big mistake when they have those policies, and are Penny wise and Dollar foolish.
You are right about older employees generally being more reliable. One problem with hiring younger, single women, was that they often got married in a year or two and had a baby so they needed time off when the baby was born. Also, every time the kid got sick they had to be off work. Then, if the husband got a better job somewhere else they moved away. (I'm not trying to start a war, I'm just stating the facts as I saw them). Overall, though, younger employees were generally more willing to be taught "our way" of doing things.

There are several considerations and tradeoffs when hiring anyone, young or old.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2013, 06:06 PM
 
1,299 posts, read 2,010,245 times
Reputation: 245
I agree there are many problems.
The biggest is that there no longer exists any Employer-employee or Employee-employer Loyalty.
And I don't think it will change soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 01:21 PM
 
5 posts, read 32,447 times
Reputation: 12
Oh my... what did I start here? I'm not sure what to say now that this has turned into a war about the economy. All the issues with job security are very real and definitely stink, but that conversation wasn't really what I was trying to achieve. I was simply looking for advice on the local area that were things maybe I couldn't find on the internet with my research pertaining to housing places to target for a job search. I'm sorry this went in such a direction of the bad economy. I mentioned all my various background (engineering, medical, etc.) to allow people to think of more than one area of employment to give me clues. Times constantly change and I have been fortunate enough to change careers and have some great long lasting jobs over the years. I'm afraid to see where this comment will lead the conversation now, so I will close for now.

I would like to thank Hemidancer and Florida Paradise for some positive info. And also to xoomer- never been to Texas, might have to plan a vacation and check it out.

Thank you to everyone for their comments, all are appreciated because it does help give insight (even if it isn't what I want to hear.) My love of Florida may be the ruin of me- haha!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Florida Space Coast
2,333 posts, read 4,364,771 times
Reputation: 1514
I know we say a lot of times whatever job you get probably won't pay as much as you would make elsewhere. Well here is a perfect example. I was thinking about changing the floor tile in the kitchen and entryway and ripping up carpet in the great room and putting carpet there as well. So I was in a home depot this evening in Massachusetts to get a rough idea of the price. The cost per labor they were advertising was $5.37 per sq ft. That seemed a little high so I called the home depot in Cape Coral, expecting it would be around $4.00 per sq ft. I am shocked it was only $1.97 per sq ft. Not even half the labor cost as up here. For $5.37 I would've done it myself but at $1.97 I'd be stupid not to pay someone to do it. But that is a low labor wage for a tough physical job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Fort Myers - Cape Coral area
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top