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Old 06-01-2018, 03:28 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,977 times
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After having my interest sparked in the redevelopment and gentrification of neighborhoods surrounding Downtown, I decided to a bit of research. One area in particular-- Berry / Hemphill-- caught my eye. It seems the city already recognized the potential for development at the intersection of the two major streets in 2007, drafting the Berry / Hemphill Village plans which have unfortunately yet to come into fruition. To the immediate west of Hemphill lies Hemphill Heights, which extends both north and south of Berry, containing American Craftsman style homes similar and cheaper than Fairmount. It would seem that this area would be incredibly lucrative to develop sometimes soon, being able to take advantage of the historic architecture of the surrounding neighborhood and create a new mixed used residential and commercial center that, if developed fully, could serve as the link between TCU Area development and that of Magnolia

When I first did my research on the Urban Village concept, I found that the Walmart was not originally included and was ardently fought by residents of Hemphill Heights who yearned for the Village to be constructed as intended. It would seem that Walmart took a significant portion of precious land that could've been used for a mixed used development or town homes. Regardless, despite the commercial clout of the company, Walmart locations have closed in areas where they don't fit in with either the existing neighborhood or the redeveloped neighborhood, such as in Southlake or along Greenville Avenue in Dallas

Furthermore, in my research, I found two articles from what seems to be a fairly well respected real estate blog, "Candy's Dirt", which twice mentioned the neighborhood as up-and-coming very soon. It's clear that realtors see the great potential in the neighborhoods for residential development, likening it to Fairmount. It seems that most residents of the neighbor seem to be blue collar, with a small handful of middle, upper middle residents. The area is also lucky to be within the bounds of the 76110 ZIP Code, which the Fort Worth Magazine recently noted experienced an almost 18% jump in average home value and was extraordinarily popular. Likewise, Envision Hemphill, a group that is devoted to the development of a park and northern part of the street has mentioned extending development all the way to I-20.

From what I gather, Fort Worth merely ambles towards redevelopment in comparison to both other cities in Texas, and ones similar throughout the country such as Denver. This, I would assume, can be blamed on poor policy and a lack of a strong business core.

Recognizing that Berry-Hemphill development and gentrification has at least been a thing of conversation and minor planning for about the last two years or so, and with the village plan already existing, I'm assuming that hope for development is more or less a shared sentiment among many in Fort Worth. In what time frame could this probably happen? Is it likely to happen? HI searched around the Development Thread and didn't discover much, but perhaps others know some things? I feel like it would be a magnificently ideal place for Fort Worth to next aim at drastically improving.
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Old 06-01-2018, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Bedford
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For the most part, I believe the neighborhood would have been just fine with the Walmart Neighborhood Market had the city made them conform to the design standards of the urban village. It makes no sense to put standards in place and then set the precedent of granting variances when the developer threatens to walk away. That said, it's a nicer looking WNM than most.


Development in that area seems likely, but the timing is anyone's guess. The rampant development on the south side is creeping steadily toward the east - there are 3 potential projects in the works for the corner of South Main and Vickery, there's an apartment project going up on Magnolia just west of South Main, and there's an apartment development and adaptive reuse of some industrial buildings happening east of TCU at the corner of Berry and 8th Ave. It seems inevitable that the revival of Berry Street will make its way to Hemphill at some point.
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Old 06-01-2018, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
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While I would like for that area to be cleaned up and for the Arts and Crafts homes to be restored I am concerned about what will happen to the current residents of that area.
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Old 06-01-2018, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
192 posts, read 154,828 times
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In recent years I have noticed an improvement of the look of this area (with details such as streetlights), particularly from the perspective of Berry Street. Capps Park in particular looks very picturesque in my opinion.


The look of the area makes it appear as if it is ripe for gentrification, though I haven't heard too much movement on anything happening lately development-wise. I would say that the local schools aside from Paschal are an issue (in terms of getting families to move here), but that isn't an issue for everybody. Improving the local schools in terms of academics, including the development of special programs at Clarke, Daggett, and DeZavala elementaries, and Daggett and Rosemont middle schools, would definitely help make the south side an even more desirable area. That said, being adjacent to Ryan Place and close to Fairmount only serves to help this area.


All of the redevelopment along South Main makes me think that the demand to redevelop in Fort Worth's south side will spread elsewhere; Berry-Hemphill is an ideal area for this in my opinion as it is close to TCU and other redeveloping areas.
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Old 06-02-2018, 02:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmlx View Post
In recent years I have noticed an improvement of the look of this area (with details such as streetlights), particularly from the perspective of Berry Street. Capps Park in particular looks very picturesque in my opinion.


The look of the area makes it appear as if it is ripe for gentrification, though I haven't heard too much movement on anything happening lately development-wise. I would say that the local schools aside from Paschal are an issue (in terms of getting families to move here), but that isn't an issue for everybody. Improving the local schools in terms of academics, including the development of special programs at Clarke, Daggett, and DeZavala elementaries, and Daggett and Rosemont middle schools, would definitely help make the south side an even more desirable area. That said, being adjacent to Ryan Place and close to Fairmount only serves to help this area.


All of the redevelopment along South Main makes me think that the demand to redevelop in Fort Worth's south side will spread elsewhere; Berry-Hemphill is an ideal area for this in my opinion as it is close to TCU and other redeveloping areas.

Yes, I would agree in regards to Capps Park. Last I heard there are talks of re-landscaping and reconstruction of the park's green spaces and facilities.

I took it upon myself to drive through the neighborhood again, and I would like to say that are some very early signs of redevelopment are showing up-- two new, and quality looking homes were built, two were renovated, and a few along Capps Park look very presentable. Nothing major, but it seems to be the beginning of progress.

I agree that the neighborhoods proximity to Ryan Place and Fairmount are great advantages, almost ensuring (I would hope) that development would spill over as those neighborhoods get too expensive for the young families who seem to be most interested in taking up renovation projects.
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