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Old 08-19-2018, 12:27 PM
 
234 posts, read 212,141 times
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The problem began roughly 1.5 years ago after these people moved into a rental duplex several doors down from our house. It began with what appeared to be an abandoned cat and since then has morphed into a parking nuisance and harassment. This is a long story, so thank you in advance for reading and offering any advice you may have that could help.

The problem began with a cat that had begun to climb over our fence, defecate on the lawn and behind the shrubs, and spray the house. The cat was skinny and appeared to be living out of doors. Sometimes it spent hours and hours in our yard lounging around our porch and sleeping on the outdoor furniture. Anytime I tried to approach it, it would run to the fence, climb over, and disappear. This went on for a few months, during which time I slowly began to make friends with it. It wore a badly tattered, sun bleached collar with an attached disk. I wanted to see the disk so that I could contact the animal's owner. Finally, one day the cat allowed me to pick it up and hold it in my lap. The only information listed on the disk was a phone number.

I belled the number, but it had been disconnected. An on-line search showed that the number had apparently belonged to someone somewhere in Cleburne, which is a town a few miles up the road from Fort Worth. My best guess was that this poor cat had either been dumped in our neighbourhood, or someone from the apartments on the street behind us had moved away and left him behind. That sort of thing happens all of the time in neighbourhoods all over. They often leave animals on the street and sometimes locked inside of the apartment/house as they move away. Frustrated apartment managers and landlords are left to deal with the poor animals, some of which are found in very bad shape. It breaks my heart that anyone would do such a thing.

Anyway, next I contacted the Animal Control officer I knew. He also belled the number and confirmed that it was disconnected. He said he no longer worked for animal control, but he advised me to contact animal control to come get the cat. Whoever I spoke to at animal control at this point refused to come get the cat on the grounds that they no longer collected feral cats. I explained that the cat was not feral. It allowed me to hold it, and once it even slipped into my house on its own volition. It wore a collar with a disk, too, so it definitely belonged to someone who must have abandoned it. He still refused any assistance.

With no help from animal control, I eventually found a rescue group that collected the cat from me and took it in for a vet check so that it could receive needed medical attention and then be adopted out. Well, guess what? The cat turned out to be microchipped. Knowing full well the cat's story, instead of contacting Animal Control so that the irresponsible owners could be fined, the vet's office contacted the owners who then collected the cat. I found out about all of this after the fact, and I was not best pleased.

As it turned out, the cat belonged to the people down the block who had been allowing it to live on the street, and who claimed that they operated a "pet service" in the area wherein they would come to your house to feed, water, walk, administer medicine, etc. to your pet whilst you were at work or on vacation. How ironic is that? They claim to offer a "pet service" yet they were allowing their own cat to live on the street in horrible heat and humidity. They also have at least two dogs down there that are left in a paved, fenced driveway in the back of the house and bark their heads off for hours at a time. I have said nothing about the dogs because most of the time I cannot hear them whilst I am indoors, but I am surprised no one else has complained.

Well, the vet's office informed these people that it was against city ordinance to allow a cat to roam the neighbourhood, and I reported them to Animal Control myself. I thought, not only is it against ordinance, it is very dangerous for the cat! Animal Control merely belled them to ask about the cat, but they swore blind they did not have any animals and did not want any. The matter was dropped. Well, since then the cat seems to stay close to their house, thankfully. I have seen it on their porch a few times, but it has not wandered down to our house again. I hoped that would be the end of any problems with these people, but it was not. The next problem that soon arose was the number of automobiles connected to their house.

At the time they first moved in down there, they had perhaps three automobiles which they parked in front of their house. Over the last several months, however, the number has grown and grown. By early last Spring, there were so many automobiles attached to that one house that I sent a letter to the owner about it asking just how many people lived in that house. Sometimes the cars ran almost the entire length of the block!

More and more, one of their cars was parked in front of my house both day and night. Often I would come outside in the morning and find small empty bottles of booze on my lawn along with other pieces of trash which I had to clean up. Also, with their vehicles parked in front of our house constantly, we could not park in front of our own house, and neither could guests or tradesmen. I had enough of it. One day, I saw one of the people parking in front of the house, and I called out to her and very nicely asked her to please choose another place to park---the other side of the street directly opposite their house, or the reserved parking area behind their house. She replied "sure, we can consider that." Then, she walked off and left her car parked in front of our house 24/7 for the next three days. Afterward, it continued to remain parked in front of our house with only short periods of time away some days. Here is the kicker, though. I noticed that even if some of their vehicles were gone so that there was space in front of their house to park, they STILL parked in front of our house. This is the case again today for example.

Anyway, I contacted police, but they told me that so long as the vehicles were parked in the right direction for the side of the street on which they were parked, they could not do anything about it. Police advised me to contact Code, which I have done twice in the last two weeks. I have been waiting for our code officer to bell me back for more than two weeks now. I expect if he ever contacts me, he is going to tell me there is nothing he can do to help. Last week I sent another letter to the owner, who lives in Arlington, and explained that the problem had only worsened over the months these people had been there. I asked her to please ask her tenants not to park in front of our house. I said if the problem continued, legal action would have to be taken for nuisance and harassment (I presume she knows this means legal action against the property owner). I was very polite and thanked her for her kind cooperation in the matter. I hope I will not have to go as far as to file a suit against her with the JP court, but I am afraid that is what I am facing as the problem has not improved since I posted the letter last Thursday.

We do not bother anyone in this neighbourhood. We do not leave animals to roam the street, and we do not keep 6+ automobiles lining the street day and night. We want these people to stay away from our house. Is there anything else we can do aside from filing a nuisance complaint against the property owner?

In all the years I have lived here, I noticed two things about the two duplexes she owns on this block. They turned over a few times over the last 4-5 years. Sometimes, a really nice tenant will move in, but they do not seem to stay more than one year. One tenant, a very nice young nurse, moved out after only 6 months. Another tenant, a very nice single older man who took excellent care of the property even paying to keep the grass, shrubs, and trees watered all Spring and Summer long, lasted only one year. Yet other tenants, two nice young ladies who shared a unit, stayed for perhaps two years and then moved away.

The good tenants do not stay (I wonder why....). The ones who stay are the ones who are problem neighbours. She had one such tenant in the house next door who let her little dog come onto our lawn daily to defecate. I complained to code about it (that was perhaps two years ago now), so what do you think the woman did? She began letting the dog wander over into our back yard/drive area. The amount of dog poop that piled up back there was unbelievable! The dog was even defecating in our flower beds along the back of the house. I told her, look, I love animals, and I will not complain if your dog wanders over here and poops so long as you come clean up behind him. She would not do it, but after a second complaint and under threat of a ticket from Code, I noticed she began taking the dog for walks around the neighbourhood to let it defecate wherever it may, and she NEVER picked up behind it. I watched her do this day after day. I felt sorry for the dog that she kept the poor animal but did not care enough about him to pick up behind him, and I wondered if she was providing for his other needs, such as shots and heart worm preventative. Anyway, I ignored her walking the dog around the neighbourhood but not picking up after it so long as she stayed away from our house. They finally moved.

Anyway, these are bad tenants to be sure, but I feel the landlord is as much to blame as the tenant if not more so. If she is notified of a problem and asked to resolve it, she should do so. No neighbourhood is designed to accommodate 6+ automobiles to one house. What else can I do at this point to keep these people away from our house? I have already contacted police and code. I want to avoid going to court, but I know not of any other option at this point. If I am overlooking something, please let me know! Thanks.

Last edited by the_little_truth_writer; 08-19-2018 at 12:59 PM..
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Old 08-19-2018, 12:51 PM
 
1,053 posts, read 1,419,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_little_truth_writer View Post
The problem began roughly 1.5 years ago after these people moved into a rental duplex several doors down from our house. It began with what appeared to be an abandoned cat and since then has morphed into a parking nuisance and harassment. This is a long story, so thank you in advance for reading and offering any advice you may have that could help.

The problem began with a cat that had begun to climb over our fence, defecate on the lawn and behind the shrubs, and spray the house. The cat was skinny and appeared to be living out of doors. Sometimes it spent hours and hours in our yard lounging around our porch and sleeping on the outdoor furniture. Anytime I tried to approach it, it would run to the fence, climb over, and disappear. This went on for a few months, during which time I slowly began to make friends with it. It wore a badly tattered, sun bleached collar with an attached disk. I wanted to see the disk so that I could contact the animal's owner. Finally, one day the cat allowed me to pick it up and hold it in my lap. The only information listed on the disk was a phone number.

I belled the number, but it had been disconnected. An on-line search showed that the number had apparently belonged to someone somewhere in Cleburne, which is a town a few miles up the road from Fort Worth. My best guess was that this poor cat had either been dumped in our neighbourhood, or someone from the apartments on the street behind us had moved away and left him behind. That sort of thing happens all of the time in neighbourhoods all over. They often leave animals on the street and sometimes locked inside of the apartment/house as they move away. Frustrated apartment managers and landlords are left to deal with the poor animals, some of which are found in very bad shape. It breaks my heart that anyone would do such a thing.

Anyway, next I contacted the Animal Control officer I knew. He also belled the number and confirmed that it was disconnected. He said he no longer worked for animal control, but he advised me to contact animal control to come get the cat. Whoever I spoke to at animal control at this point refused to come get the cat on the grounds that they no longer collected feral cats. I explained that the cat was not feral. It allowed me to hold it, and once it even slipped into my house on its own volition. It wore a collar with a disk, too, so it definitely belonged to someone who must have abandoned it. He still refused any assistance.

With no help from animal control, I eventually found a rescue group that collected the cat from me and took it in for a vet check so that it could receive needed medical attention and then be adopted out. Well, guess what? The cat turned out to be microchipped. Knowing full well the cat's story, instead of contacting Animal Control so that the irresponsible owners could be fined, the vet's office contacted the owners who then collected the cat. I found out about all of this after the fact, and I was not best pleased.

As it turned out, the cat belonged to the people down the block who had been allowing it to live on the street, and who claimed that they operated a "pet service" in the area wherein they would come to your house to feed, water, walk, administer medicine, etc. to your pet whilst you were at work or on vacation. How ironic is that? They claim to offer a "pet service" yet they were allowing their own cat to live on the street in horrible heat and humidity. They also have at least two dogs down there that are left in a paved, fenced driveway in the back of the house and bark their heads off for hours at a time. I have said nothing about the dogs because most of the time I cannot hear them whilst I am indoors, but I am surprised no one else has complained.

Well, the vet's office informed these people that it was against city ordinance to allow a cat to roam the neighbourhood, and I reported them to Animal Control myself. I thought, not only is it against ordinance, it is very dangerous for the cat! Animal Control merely belled them to ask about the cat, but they swore blind they did not have any animals and did not want any. The matter was dropped. Well, since then the cat seems to stay close to their house, thankfully. I have seen it on their porch a few times, but it has not wandered down to our house again. I hoped that would be the end of any problems with these people, but it was not. The next problem that soon arose was the number of automobiles connected to their house.
At the time they first moved in down there, they had perhaps three automobiles which they parked in front of their house. Over the last several months, however, the number has grown and grown. By early last Spring, there were so many automobiles attached to that one house that I sent a letter to the owner about it asking just how many people lived in that house. Sometimes the cars ran almost the entire length of the block!

More and more, one of their cars was parked in front of my house both day and night. Often I would come outside in the morning and find small empty bottles of booze on my lawn along with other pieces of trash which I had to clean up. Also, with their vehicles parked in front of our house constantly, we could not park in front of our own house, and neither could guests or tradesmen. I had enough of it. One day, I saw one of the people parking in front of the house, and I called out to her and very nicely asked her to please choose another place to park---the other side of the street directly opposite their house, or the reserved parking area behind their house. She replied "sure, we can consider that." Then, she walked off and left her car parked in front of our house 24/7 for the next three days. Afterward, it continued to remain parked in front of our house with only short periods of time away some days. Here is the kicker, though. I noticed that even if some of their vehicles were gone so that there was space in front of their house to park, they STILL parked in front of our house. This is the case again today for example.

Anyway, I contacted police, but they told me that so long as the vehicles were parked in the right direction for the side of the street on which they were parked, they could not do anything about it. Police advised me to contact Code, which I have done twice in the last two weeks. I have been waiting for our code officer to bell me back for more than two weeks now. I expect if he ever contacts me, he is going to tell me there is nothing he can do to help. Last week I sent another letter to the owner, who lives in Arlington, and explained that the problem had only worsened over the months these people had been there. I asked her to please ask her tenants not to park in front of our house. I said if the problem continued, legal action would have to be taken for nuisance and harassment (I presume she knows this means legal action against the property owner). I was very polite and thanked her for her kind cooperation in the matter. I hope I will not have to go as far as to file a suit against her with the JP court, but I am afraid that is what I am facing as the problem has not improved since I posted the letter last Thursday.

We do not bother anyone in this neighbourhood. We do not leave animals to roam the street, and we do not keep 6+ automobiles lining the street day and night. We want these people to stay away from our house. Is there anything else we can do aside from filing a nuisance complaint against the property owner?

In all the years I have lived here, I noticed two things about the two duplexes she owns on this block. They turned over a few times over the last 4-5 years. Sometimes, a really nice tenant will move in, but they do not seem to stay more than one year. One tenant, a very nice young nurse, moved out after only 6 months.
Another tenant, a very nice single older man who took excellent care of the property even paying to keep the grass, shrubs, and trees watered all Spring and Summer long, lasted only one year. The good ones do not stay. The ones who stay are the ones who are problem neighbours. She had one such tenant in the house next door who let her little dog come onto our lawn daily to defecate. I complained to code about it (that was perhaps two years ago now), and so what do you think the woman did? She began letting the dog wander over into our back yard/drive area. The amount of dog poop that piled up back there was unbelievable! The dog was even defecating in our flower beds along the back of the house. I told her, look, I love animals, and I will not complain if your dog wanders over here and poops so long as you come clean up behind him. She would not do it, but after a second complaint and under threat of a ticket from Code, I noticed she began taking the dog for walks around the neighbourhood to let it defecate wherever it may, and she NEVER picked up behind it. I ignored that until they finally moved.

Anyway, these are bad tenants to be sure, but I feel the landlord is as much to blame as the tenant if not more so. If she is notified of a problem and asked to resolve it, she should do so. No neighbourhood is designed to accommodate 6+ automobiles to one house. What else can I do at this point to keep these people away from our house? I want to avoid going to court, but I know not of any other option at this point. If I am overlooking something, please let me know! Thanks.
I feel your pain. Why can't people be considerate? How is the golden rule so lacking in a place so ostensibly religious?

In areas that have a combination of rentals and owner-occupied homes, these kinds of issues seem to flourish due to different expectations and customs. The heart of the issue, in my opinion, is the negligence of the landlord. At a police/ city code level, your grievances are likely perceived to be minor and at a low level on the hierarchy of what to address. That reflects how understaffed the city is.

A few thoughts come to mind: you might contact your Neighborhood Police Officer and discuss the matter with him/her. They can be quite helpful and part of their job is to help negotiate these types of issues in order to keep a sense of community. Secondly, you might look into contacting your city representative if you feel like city codes need to be changed or enforced better. Lastly, are you part of the neighborhood association? Often there are well-informed folks who can help you there. I don't know how likely it is to flush a negligent landlord out, but getting the house on record for violations with the city would likely help your cause, it seems to me.
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Old 08-19-2018, 01:20 PM
 
234 posts, read 212,141 times
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Campeador, I did speak to our NPO. He said he could not do anything about it since the vehicles were parked the right way on the street. I feel he should have been willing to speak to them and ask them not to park here anymore, but my best guess is since he feels the vehicles are not illegally parked, if they ignore him, there is nothing more he can do, so I understand his reluctance to say anything to them. He asked me if I thought about putting up orange cones on the street in front of our house. I said, no, that was something I had not considered because not only would it be costly to purchase orange cones, also they could just move them or even steal them. He agreed that they could be moved without violating any law. He was the one who suggested I contact Code, which as I explained I have done. We question how many people are living out of that unit, but in similar circumstances years ago, Code told me that all they can do is to ask someone living there how many people live there. So long as deny more that more than the number allowed by city ordinance lives there, Code can do nothing more, so I do not expect much help from Code.

Our NPO also gave me the email address of the neighbourhood association president. I contacted the person weeks ago, but there has been no reply. Not really sure what they could do anyway. They have no real power compared to police and Code Compliance. Contacting the city representative for this area is not likely to help in the long run much less the short run. Many years ago I lived in an apartment complex where there were far more people living in a one and two bedroom units than was allowed by law. Landlord denied it. Finally, I took photos of one unit where it was plain that the tiny one bedroom unit had two adults and several children. The landlord STILL denied it. I went in person to speak with someone at the mayor's office with a ton of photos from the property to show what was happening. She was sympathetic, but nothing was done. I ended up moving, and finally, a couple of years later, the old, badly maintained complex was sold and knocked down, and a large, up market complex built in its place. In other words, it was gentrified. I could not afford an apartment there if I wanted one as it is so close to the university, but it just goes to show how good people get pushed out of a neighbourhood because bad landlords do not properly maintain their properties.

I am afraid going to court is going to be my only other option. I am so disgusted. I take very good care of this property. I even pay for a company to treat the lawn year round to keep the grass healthy and flourishing. I am one of the few non-owners who pays to keep the property watered. I am about to pay to have two gates installed at either end of our alley to keep out trespassers from the apartment complex on the street behind us. I have a good landlord who has not increased my rent in four years because he know what care I provide this property whilst most tenants would not spend a penny toward upkeep, but what I see happening over and over again is good tenants like me being forced out by bad tenants who are installed by bad landlords. I agree with you 100%, Campeador, that the biggest blame lies with the landlord who is allowing this to happen even after she is notified of the problem. What does she care? She lives in Arlington and does not have to put up with it.
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Old 08-19-2018, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,154 posts, read 2,437,376 times
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Move. Get out of that neighborhood.

When we moved to our development off Old Decatur Road, it was a nice place, lawns tended, etc. They development has since changed quite a bit.

Last night someone missed their turn and drove over some grass we tend. Few if any loose dogs but lots of neighbors parking all over the place. We have a HOA but their hands are tied and violation notices do no good. People can park on any street here whether they live near the house or not as long as they are legally parked. Has been a major neighborhood issue. It is a mixed neighborhood of rentals and owners. Some renters actually take better care of their yards. Trash cans left in the street for days, Star-Telegram advertiser paper not picked up but rolled over with their cars for weeks. Just plain trashy.

We are planning to finish our renovation and relocate in the next two years, probably to a home and five or so acres in CO, MT or WA.

We are better than this.
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Old 08-19-2018, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
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The reality is that you do not own the street or sidewalk in front of your house. The only time a vehicle will be ticketed for street parking is when that car hasn’t been moved every 24-72 hours (depending on local ordinances). It will not be ticketed or towed for parking on a residential street that’s not a private (HOA controlled) street if its regularly moved and not abandoned.

I know how annoying this is. I had a neighbor across the street who always parked in front of my house while both his own driveway and the street in front of his house were clear of any cars. I resolved this by watering my lawn quite frequently when he parked there (opps, the water liberally splashed his car, too). I also would park my car right in front of his house when he parked in front of my place (even though I liked to park in my garage, I would do this). Eventually he must have decided he’d rather have his car clean — without water drops from my lawn sprinkler — or he’d rather I don’t park in front of his house. He started parking in front of another home a few doors down, but I was freed of him.
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Old 08-19-2018, 04:06 PM
 
234 posts, read 212,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mschrief View Post
Move. Get out of that neighborhood.

When we moved to our development off Old Decatur Road, it was a nice place, lawns tended, etc. They development has since changed quite a bit.

Last night someone missed their turn and drove over some grass we tend. Few if any loose dogs but lots of neighbors parking all over the place. We have a HOA but their hands are tied and violation notices do no good. People can park on any street here whether they live near the house or not as long as they are legally parked. Has been a major neighborhood issue. It is a mixed neighborhood of rentals and owners. Some renters actually take better care of their yards. Trash cans left in the street for days, Star-Telegram advertiser paper not picked up but rolled over with their cars for weeks. Just plain trashy.

We are planning to finish our renovation and relocate in the next two years, probably to a home and five or so acres in CO, MT or WA.

We are better than this.
I am very sorry to hear it. I see similar things around here, too. If I see neighbours leaving their bins out the next day after collection, or putting them out too early, or worse, many landlords and some owners putting out bulk trash a month before the once a month pick-up, I report it. Reporting to Code has been hit or miss. The last time I spoke to a Code officer in person, I was told that each officer has far more territory to cover than they can handle well. The city needs to hire more people, but they apparently are not going to do it. I notice the Code officers turn over pretty quickly, too, but heck, I can say that about the postal carriers, too! Last week, I saw another new face that delivered the post at 6 p.m. Never saw this one before, but he makes number 30 in only five years, which seems incredible to me.

Relocating maybe a good option for you, but it is not a good option for me. I have watched this pattern of good people abandoning neighbourhoods for at almost 60 years. It is not a long term solution to these problems, and it is often not even a short term solution.

I do not want to move. I have probably the best landlord that I have ever had in my life. He responds to repair requests promptly, and he only sends out professional tradesmen, unlike my last landlord who sent out any warm body he could find who usually had no idea what they were doing and often showed up without even basic tools! I am in an excellent location for those few things around which my life revolve, and at my age, just the physical work necessary to move is more than I ever want to do again. I hope this is going to be my last home. I do not want to move, and I certainly do not believe that inconsiderate, low-rent neighbours from low-rent landlords should force me out of the home I love. (By low-rent, I am not referring to actual rental rates but to the quality of the people involved.) Why should people like us constantly bear the financial loss of moving and moving because of bad landlords and their rotten tenants? Why should not the people who are BENEFITING FINANCIALLY be held responsible, i.e. the landlords?

Over the course of my lifetime, I have moved probably 40 or more times. We moved many times over the years for my spouse's career. I have moved in the past over bad tenants/bad landlords, too. I am sick of it. Aside from the enormous physical labour involved, there are the costs to pay movers (a few hundred dollars), transfer utilities, adjust a new home, e.g. putting up new curtains and curtain rods if the old ones no longer work, etc., etc., and you have no way of knowing if you will not end up encountering the same or similar problems in the next house. This is true whether you own or lease. No, I do not think moving is the solution if you love your home. I think the solution is for good tenants, good landlords, and good owner occupied people to stand together and try to get something done about the bad landlords and their bad tenants. I know I have been trying for years to thwart some of the problems.

For example, there is a man in my neighbourhood who has been parking an 18 wheeler around the neighbourhood and in his drive for a minimum of 5 years that I am aware. I learnt that by not parking at a commercial lot as he is supposed to do, he has pocketed roughly $200 per month or $12K over the course of the last five years---and, I am sure he has probably been around here longer than that, too. Meanwhilst, the weight of the vehicle alone keeps opening pot holes in the streets around here. Police have ticketed him and even went so far as to ticket the property owner, yet this man keeps parking here. He now parks the tractor portion of the rig in the driveway because police cannot come onto the property to remove it from the driveway. It has been very frustrating, but at least police have been trying to get him out of here.

Low-rent, yes, that is exactly what is that behaviour---very, very low rent, i.e. trashy, slummy, uncouth, uncivilised. It is ruining our neighbourhoods. What were reasonably affordable homes for relatively poor people are being ruined by this element. Once the neighbourhood suffers enough, it will become gentrified, and people like myself and my next door neighbour will be pushed out. It is happening around here already.

In the last 3 years, for example, I have seen at least 5-6 old, small homes sold, knocked down, and much nicer new homes built in their stead. What happened to the decent people who used to live there? Where did they go? Could I afford to buy one of those homes, or even to lease one? No, and nor could a lot of people around here. This is one reason why I fight. I fight for decent people like myself who take care of their homes and are considerate, law abiding neighbours who want to see this stopped. We need city government behind us.

For one thing, we need city government to have zero tolerance for residences were there are 3 or more people living to a room. Why is the city not ending this? That is what I want to know. Is it because preventing this in our neighbourhoods means the city will have to come up with more housing solutions for these people and do not want the burden of doing so, so they let them come in and destroy decent neighbourhoods?

It is time for a change! Change is long overdue.
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Old 08-19-2018, 04:23 PM
 
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I am with you on the cat situation, too bad the rescue folks didn't find a new home for the neglected cat.

But, You will never be able to bring a civil suit against someone for parking on a public street.

You really should find something to take the focus off of your neighbors. it is unhealthy to let yourself be constantly aggravated.

Also, it may simply get worse now that you've contacted them and their LL....Sometimes people like this get worse just to p'i's's you off.

Keep us posted on the LL response.
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Old 08-19-2018, 04:32 PM
 
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Watch an episode of Fear Thy Neighbor. Sometimes the best thing you can do is just ignore bad behavior. The Court system will not solve a neighbor problem. If it is that bad MOVE.

I own my home and my neighbors have 5 cars that are always parked in front of MY house. Their garage is so full if crap they can't park any of their cars in it..This seems to be a Texas thing. It's irritating, but I am not going to start a problem with my neighbor. Good luck!
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Old 08-19-2018, 04:41 PM
 
234 posts, read 212,141 times
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Originally Posted by JanND View Post
I am with you on the cat situation, too bad the rescue folks didn't find a new home for the neglected cat.

But, You will never be able to bring a civil suit against someone for parking on a public street.

You really should find something to take the focus off of your neighbors. it is unhealthy to let yourself be constantly aggravated.

Also, it may simply get worse now that you've contacted them and their LL....Sometimes people like this get worse just to p'i's's you off.

Keep us posted on the LL response.
No rescue group is going to keep an animal once an owner is identified, unless the owner cannot be reached.

I agree with you about it getting worse, but that may be in my favour. The more obviously harassing it is, the more of a case I have against them for harassment and nuisance. There are reported cases where landlords have been sued for nuisance. A landlord cannot ignore what s/he is allowing to happen at his/her property.
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Old 08-19-2018, 04:53 PM
 
234 posts, read 212,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldKlas View Post
The reality is that you do not own the street or sidewalk in front of your house. The only time a vehicle will be ticketed for street parking is when that car hasn’t been moved every 24-72 hours (depending on local ordinances). It will not be ticketed or towed for parking on a residential street that’s not a private (HOA controlled) street if its regularly moved and not abandoned.

I know how annoying this is. I had a neighbor across the street who always parked in front of my house while both his own driveway and the street in front of his house were clear of any cars. I resolved this by watering my lawn quite frequently when he parked there (opps, the water liberally splashed his car, too). I also would park my car right in front of his house when he parked in front of my place (even though I liked to park in my garage, I would do this). Eventually he must have decided he’d rather have his car clean — without water drops from my lawn sprinkler — or he’d rather I don’t park in front of his house. He started parking in front of another home a few doors down, but I was freed of him.
WorldKlas, thank you for relating this experience and how you handled it. Your neighbour sounds despicable!

In fact, I was considering doing the same thing, i.e. parking my vehicle in front of their house. The only reason I have not done it is because their house is too far down the block for me to be able to see my vehicle unless I leave my yard and walk out to the street. However, that fact only goes to point up how mush street space they are taking up. They live in a small, two bedroom unit. No one would expect a small two bedroom unit to have 6+ vehicles attached to it. Even if it were a larger 3 bedroom house, who expects to have a house with 6+ vehicles attached to it? I see the same thing one block over. There is a house there that regularly has 4 vehicles in their drive, plus a couple parked in front of the house, plus another one or two parked across the street in a private parking lot. They get away with parking in that lot because the owners simply have not tried to stop it for some reason. They are not bothering my house directly, but it pains me to see this. In their favour, however, I will say that they take excellent care of their house. What makes them less than desirable neighbours is the number of vehicles attached to the house. I wish I had more than one vehicle, though, because I would park one in front of the house of the tenants down my block and leave it parked there for a few days at a time. They have one pick up truck that has been parked in the same spot now for at least two weeks. Police have not bothered it. I have not said anything about it in particular because it is parked in front of the house next door to me. Why the people there have not complained is beyond me, or maybe they feel helpless to get it removed.

I am not sure this area has a privately controlled HOA. Police told me about a group that is supposedly covering this area, but I do not know how official it is, and I have not been able to contact the person whom he named. I am sick of this element in our neighbourhoods, though.

Last edited by the_little_truth_writer; 08-19-2018 at 05:13 PM..
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