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Old 05-10-2019, 03:23 PM
 
4,618 posts, read 7,746,939 times
Reputation: 2852

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Quote:
Originally Posted by naterator View Post
Fort Worth would be another Amarillo if it weren't for Dallas. Or perhaps Abilene, or even Tyler, once the growth from WWII died off and oil peaked in the 1980s.

Fort Worth actually did experience a population decline between 1970 and 1980 and didn't grow in a meaningful way in the 1990s.

I can't envision a scenario in which Fort Worth would be its current size without Dallas.
Your post really doesn’t make much sense considering Fort Worth was its own distinct town from the start. And for the majority of its history has been one of largest cities in the state. You lost any type of credibility when you stated it would be another Amarillo without Dallas. A little research would show you the two towns grew into one another.
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Old 05-10-2019, 03:29 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,836 posts, read 2,060,576 times
Reputation: 4317
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Yes. "Screwed over." Part of that killed a lot of chances for business on this side of The Metroplex.

And your belief that Fort worth had NO chance at Amazon is exactly what I'm talking about.
Fort Worth absolutely had no chance at Amazon. You can hate it, but it is true.
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Old 05-10-2019, 03:55 PM
 
4,618 posts, read 7,746,939 times
Reputation: 2852
I personally don’t believe Dallas is screwing over Fort Worth. Fort Worth is screwing over itself because of continuing to elect non progressive leadership. I would best describe Fort Worth as being stuck. Fort Worth needs to rise up and meet the challenge that is being presented. This town needs to reinvent itself.
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Old 05-10-2019, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Arlington
242 posts, read 222,455 times
Reputation: 443
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Your post really doesn’t make much sense considering Fort Worth was its own distinct town from the start. And for the majority of its history has been one of largest cities in the state. You lost any type of credibility when you stated it would be another Amarillo without Dallas. A little research would show you the two towns grew into one another.
Ummm....how does my post not make sense?

If I have "lost all credibility" - you don't have to believe me, just look at the census data for 1970 and again for 1980. You'll see a population decline for Fort Worth.

If there was just Fort Worth and no Dallas, it is highly unlikely it would be the city of 900,000 that it is today. It would be much, much smaller. Like Amarillo. Or Abilene. Or Tyler. These are single towns that didn't have the benefit of a larger, economically powerful neighbor. And Fort Worth would probably have followed a similar pattern.

I agree with you on many things, but your defensiveness here is really off-putting.
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:07 PM
 
4,618 posts, read 7,746,939 times
Reputation: 2852
Quote:
Originally Posted by naterator View Post
Ummm....how does my post not make sense?

If I have "lost all credibility" - you don't have to believe me, just look at the census data for 1970 and again for 1980. You'll see a population decline for Fort Worth.

If there was just Fort Worth and no Dallas, it is highly unlikely it would be the city of 900,000 that it is today. It would be much, much smaller. Like Amarillo. Or Abilene. Or Tyler. These are single towns that didn't have the benefit of a larger, economically powerful neighbor. And Fort Worth would probably have followed a similar pattern.

I agree with you on many things, but your defensiveness here is really off-putting.
Cities go through growth spurts and declines all the time. That’s nothing new. Fort Worth has always been a major city in this state since it’s existence. Why would you even compare it to Tyler, Abilene, or Amarillo that have never been remotely Fort Worth size or big cities in this state. Your logic to me doesn’t make much sense. Cities just don’t pop up for no reason you no and for that matter the areas between Dallas and Fort Worth were once undeveloped praires you know. Fort Worth does not owe its existence to Dallas and nor was Dallas remotely responsible for much of its growth throughout its history. I am for the most part a very reasonable poster and very critical of Fort Worth but I think your view on this particular subject is extremely shortsighted.
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:59 PM
 
21 posts, read 9,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Cities go through growth spurts and declines all the time. That’s nothing new. Fort Worth has always been a major city in this state since it’s existence. Why would you even compare it to Tyler, Abilene, or Amarillo that have never been remotely Fort Worth size or big cities in this state. Your logic to me doesn’t make much sense. Cities just don’t pop up for no reason you no and for that matter the areas between Dallas and Fort Worth were once undeveloped praires you know. Fort Worth does not owe its existence to Dallas and nor was Dallas remotely responsible for much of its growth throughout its history. I am for the most part a very reasonable poster and very critical of Fort Worth but I think your view on this particular subject is extremely shortsighted.
+1

We moved from West Texas to Irving in 1965 so I'm familiar with Fort Worth and Dallas both very well. Fort Worth has a GREAT and unique history, culture, amenities, neighborhoods, food.......... It would be the same wonderful first class city with or without Dallas. I would NOT want it to be just like Dallas. I like Dallas fine - no knock on Big D from me.
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Old 05-10-2019, 11:31 PM
JJG
Status: "100%" (set 16 minutes ago)
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,566 posts, read 20,383,706 times
Reputation: 7469
Quote:
Originally Posted by naterator View Post
Fort Worth would be another Amarillo if it weren't for Dallas. Or perhaps Abilene, or even Tyler, once the growth from WWII died off and oil peaked in the 1980s.

Fort Worth actually did experience a population decline between 1970 and 1980 and didn't grow in a meaningful way in the 1990s.

I can't envision a scenario in which Fort Worth would be its current size without Dallas.
Everything you said was pretty much a slap in the face to this city and based completely in ignorant assumptions.
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Old 05-11-2019, 12:18 AM
JJG
Status: "100%" (set 16 minutes ago)
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,566 posts, read 20,383,706 times
Reputation: 7469
Oh, and Fort Worth experienced that population decline because of the sharp increase of crime as well as the lack of jobs... the 80s was a horrible time for the entire state of Texas. Some cities were just hit a little harder than others.

Nothing at all to do with proximity to Dallas.
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Old 05-11-2019, 08:36 AM
 
1,053 posts, read 1,409,086 times
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Things I love about Fort Worth:
* The Trinity River trails. I wish the river were clean enough to safely navigate, fish, and swim in, but as a cyclist I absolutely LOVE these trails and how they have gotten better over the past decade, adding numerous pedestrian bridges, and better connectivity overall.

* The museums. I love the Kimbell, the Modern, and Amon Carter in particular. FW Community Art Center is great too. This area makes me feel like I'm in a bigger, more sophisticated city.

*Sundance Square. Converting this from a car-centric space to a person-oriented one was a huge improvement.

* Eclectic mix of people. I like the sunny disposition of folks here. There is a very agreeable quality to locals who have deep roots here. Many of us transplants manage to become integrated into the fabric of the community rather easily. In certain pockets of the city the population has become quite worldly and cosmopolitan. We have friends from over 20 countries.

* Music. I wish we could land more concerts for bands that I like (most stop in Dallas instead), but the locally grown music scene here is quite strong.


Things I dislike about Fort Worth:

* Shady politics and good old boy modus operandi. It feels like an antiquated power structure with several oligarchs wielding way too much power, which leads to boondoggles that make the rich richer and does not benefit the majority. Exhibit A: https://trinityrivervision.org. As an active citizen, I've been to numerous city council meetings and the impression I get is that many city council members are in the pockets of developers. Too often they vote in ways that hurts their constituents.

* Huge income inequality, which is connected to access to education, and socio-economic mobility. This leads to crime and an overall feeling of extremes (extreme wealth and extreme poverty).

* In line with point one above, our downtown is quasi-privately owned and run by the Bass family. This has some benefits, to be fair, like the ability to carry out a vision like the Sundance Square renovations, which are wonderful, but also some negatives, which include a hyper-sanitized ambience. FW's downtown lacks an edge. I sense that it's been controlled with such a tight grip that it has pushed the true innovators of our community away to other parts (mostly to the Near Southside).

* Sprawl and major lack of public transportation. The city's comprehensive plan (worth a read: 2019 Comprehensive Plan | City of Fort Worth, Texas) gives evidence of a nascent awareness that this needs to be addressed, but in my ten years here I have only heard a lot of talk and seen very little action. Given the area's history with petroleum, folks' love for the automobile is understandable, but I find it provincial and short sighted. It works for small towns and ranch-based areas, but we're becoming an urbanized (in parts) area, and we need to develop other transit options. We have a freeway system worthy of a much larger city, but we have a dearth of urban amenities for a city of this size.

* Edit to add: lack of access to outdoor recreation. Yes, the Trinity Trails are great, but FW suffers from very few outdoor recreational areas. Part of the problem is state-wide; TX has very little public land, so only the rich have access to, say, the nearby Brazos River or the Palo Pinto "Mountains" (small hills). We are a long ways away from a national park. As much as I love Big Bend, the 8 hour drive there is brutally ugly and boring and not feasible for a weekend trip. Texas State Parks has acquired land for a park in the Palo Pintos, but is so underfunded that they cannot even open it to the public and who knows if they ever will.

Last edited by Campeador; 05-11-2019 at 09:09 AM.. Reason: Poor memory!
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
1,995 posts, read 1,236,209 times
Reputation: 2962
I would add to the negative list the city's park's system. Too many of the parks are in disrepair or have inadequate parking but no safe way to reach them by foot or bicycle.
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