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Old 01-27-2020, 09:41 AM
 
1,050 posts, read 1,340,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmlx View Post
Foster Park is assigned to Tanglewood, though it will most likely be re-assigned to the under-construction Overton Park Elementary (the Tanglewood "reliever school") once it is completed in August. I would expect Overton Park ES to have the same issues with an affluence bubble as Tanglewood has, since its attendance zone is being entirely carved out from a part of Tanglewood's zone.

Alice Carlson is harder to get selected for, compared to Daggett Montessori, as there is no local preference. In fact they prioritize the children of district employees (who live in-district, that is) the highest. Too much of their student body is, in my opinion, the children of district employees. The FWISD board could easily fix this, and give more deserving children district-wide a chance, by making staff preference only applicable for staff placed at the school where the parent is requesting preference (such that only a parent actually working at Alice Carlson could get staff preference for their child at Alice Carlson).
I don't think reality lines up with your opinion about the student body of AC. I'd love to see the numbers to be sure, but my estimate would be that fewer than 10% and possibly fewer than 5% of AC students have a parent working in FWISD. BTW, I do think that AC should give a preference to folks in the neighborhood.

Even if this percentage were higher, I wouldn't see that as a negative thing. As a society, we do a horrible job of supporting teachers and education in general. It is a a hugely important job for our community's well-being, and teachers put in 50-60 work weeks all the time. Some are not only teachers, but also social workers, essentially, helping disadvantaged youth and families get an education and try to improve their lives. As a community we should give them more support and be more thankful of them.

One other discrepancy:
Foster park NEIGHBORHOOD, which is composed of homes quite a ways west of the actual park, is zoned for the new Overton Park Elementary, but the majority of homes near Foster Park (the park itself) are zoned for Westcliff.
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Old 01-29-2020, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
149 posts, read 115,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Campeador View Post

One other discrepancy:
Foster park NEIGHBORHOOD, which is composed of homes quite a ways west of the actual park, is zoned for the new Overton Park Elementary, but the majority of homes near Foster Park (the park itself) are zoned for Westcliff.
Only the southeastern part of the Foster Park neighborhood is zoned to Westcliff; most is zoned to Overton Park (Tanglewood until August), as per the FWISD school locator. This southeastern area generally follows (and includes homes along) South Drive on the north, Inwood Road on the west, and Selkirk Drive on the southeast. Once you get north and west of this area then you are in the Overton Park zone. Even a few homes right next to Foster Park itself on its west side, along Rainer Court, are actually assigned to Overton Park despite being within walking distance of Westcliff.
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Old 02-03-2020, 09:19 PM
 
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We drove around some today, and it helped us answer some questions yet raised more. We still aren't certain whether we are moving back, though.

- The Clearfork development is extremely boujee, and it seems like it's designed for pretentious assh*les. Definitely not our scene.

- Tanglewood has great housing stock, and we liked the Overton Park area south of Tanglewood. I just wonder if this is where those pretentious assh*les live. Nevertheless, it seemed very family-oriented, and the mature trees and 1/3 acre lots are great. I'm a sucker for custom houses built in the '60s, and there are plenty of them here.

- Berkeley Place is still as charming as ever.

- The area by the Colonial Country Club....holy crap. That's not really our scene, but it was very, very beautiful. If I wanted to play Gatsby, that's where I'd go.

- Fairmount is still surprisingly street-by-street and even house-by-house. It was like that back when we lived in Ryan Place, and I expected to find that all of the houses had been renovated by now. That definitely was not the case.


I'm still not sure where we'd choose if we decided to move tomorrow. Maybe Berkeley. Maybe Tanglewood. Maybe we'd do something different and look at Ridglea Hills and do private school. When the real estate developers start targeting the pretentious assh*les, it's the beginning of the end for me.
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Old 02-04-2020, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
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If you’re wanting an older ranch style home with character, did you look at Overton Ridge or the Far East area of Benbrook off of 183? I’m not sure how good the schools are, but you can sometimes find some lovely homes there more affordably than some of the areas you mentioned. As for Clearfork, it does have one of my favorite restaurants, Malai Kitchen.
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Old 02-05-2020, 11:19 AM
 
55 posts, read 55,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wittgenstein's Ghost View Post
- The area by the Colonial Country Club....holy crap. That's not really our scene, but it was very, very beautiful. If I wanted to play Gatsby, that's where I'd go.
We lived across the street from Colonial because we wanted an older home, pretty trees and a convenient location. Raised our kids there, both graduated from Paschal. Never joined the club and ignored the pretentious people. There were definitely Obama signs around during the election, so we weren’t alone!

Don’t be too quick to discount an area if its aesthetics appeal to you.

Agree with you about Berkeley. It would be a strong contender if we ever moved back.
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Old 02-05-2020, 12:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcualum View Post
If you’re wanting an older ranch style home with character, did you look at Overton Ridge or the Far East area of Benbrook off of 183? I’m not sure how good the schools are, but you can sometimes find some lovely homes there more affordably than some of the areas you mentioned. As for Clearfork, it does have one of my favorite restaurants, Malai Kitchen.
Thanks for a great post -- as always.


Quote:
Originally Posted by justtryharder View Post
We lived across the street from Colonial because we wanted an older home, pretty trees and a convenient location. Raised our kids there, both graduated from Paschal. Never joined the club and ignored the pretentious people. There were definitely Obama signs around during the election, so we weren’t alone!

Don’t be too quick to discount an area if its aesthetics appeal to you.

Agree with you about Berkeley. It would be a strong contender if we ever moved back.
Good to know. It really did look like a special place. One thing I've found useful is the NYT 2016 voting map. It allows you to view how very small areas voted in 2016, and it's helpful for me to see that, even in some otherwise red areas, there still might be 35-40% of people who lean left. "Red" is not a great descriptor sometimes, particularly when looking in the city. People who lean left I think tend to gravitate toward the city rather than the suburbs, and some of this trend probably holds even in wealthy areas.

Thanks for your insight. One question, though: Were there a lot of other young kids in the area? One thing we are aware of is that we are probably wealthier than most people with their first baby, and it's important to us that we live in a neighborhood that has some other families that are in the same life stage we are. We want our kids to have other kids to play with, not a bunch of 55 year old executives and retirees (some of that is fine, but a mix would be nice). I'm concerned that really wealthy areas may not have that.
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Old 02-05-2020, 12:30 PM
 
1,050 posts, read 1,340,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wittgenstein's Ghost View Post
Thanks for a great post -- as always.




Good to know. It really did look like a special place. One thing I've found useful is the NYT 2016 voting map. It allows you to view how very small areas voted in 2016, and it's helpful for me to see that, even in some otherwise red areas, there still might be 35-40% of people who lean left. "Red" is not a great descriptor sometimes, particularly when looking in the city. People who lean left I think tend to gravitate toward the city rather than the suburbs, and some of this trend probably holds even in wealthy areas.

Thanks for your insight. One question, though: Were there a lot of other young kids in the area? One thing we are aware of is that we are probably wealthier than most people with their first baby, and it's important to us that we live in a neighborhood that has some other families that are in the same life stage we are. We want our kids to have other kids to play with, not a bunch of 55 year old executives and retirees (some of that is fine, but a mix would be nice). I'm concerned that really wealthy areas may not have that.
Lots of kids in the area. Surprisingly good mix too.
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Old 02-05-2020, 12:45 PM
 
55 posts, read 55,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wittgenstein's Ghost View Post
Thanks for a great post -- as always.




Good to know. It really did look like a special place. One thing I've found useful is the NYT 2016 voting map. It allows you to view how very small areas voted in 2016, and it's helpful for me to see that, even in some otherwise red areas, there still might be 35-40% of people who lean left. "Red" is not a great descriptor sometimes, particularly when looking in the city. People who lean left I think tend to gravitate toward the city rather than the suburbs, and some of this trend probably holds even in wealthy areas.

Thanks for your insight. One question, though: Were there a lot of other young kids in the area? One thing we are aware of is that we are probably wealthier than most people with their first baby, and it's important to us that we live in a neighborhood that has some other families that are in the same life stage we are. We want our kids to have other kids to play with, not a bunch of 55 year old executives and retirees (some of that is fine, but a mix would be nice). I'm concerned that really wealthy areas may not have that.
I wouldn’t qualify it as “a lot of other young kids” but they were around. It was nothing like when we lived in one of the new master planned subdivisions in the ‘burbs, for example, but we were willing to make the trade off.

I’m wondering if Berkeley or Mistletoe Heights might be a better fit, based on your price point and interest in younger families. Lily B Clayton is a lovely neighborhood elementary school that feeds into Paschal. So many nice families in that area, from my recollection.
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
127 posts, read 60,882 times
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You can find everything you want in Keller ISD, come here and enjoy diversity
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asiatrails View Post
You can find everything you want in Keller ISD, come here and enjoy diversity
Thanks for your suggestion.

I'm not sure Keller really fits any of our criteria, though. It's the suburbs rather than the city, it's very conservative (70% for Trump in 2016) and religious, it's 94% white, it's far from the mountain bike trails I like to ride, and it's generally pretty vanilla and economically homogeneous and is kind of hard to get to from most places we frequent. That last point might be changing as the construction on 35 wraps (has wrapped?) up. I spend a lot of time in Southlake (and was in Keller last week), and those sorts of burbs just aren't what we're looking for. If we were going to go that route, we'd probably look at Grapevine to be near the lake.
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