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Old 02-14-2021, 07:35 AM
 
66 posts, read 26,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProtege View Post
Yeah is nice to see some developments south of I-20. There are a few larger residential developments and some warehouse/manufacturing facilities being built, but not much in the way of larger commercial / office developments. Of course the money goes where the money is at and there's just more money in those suburbs that you mentioned. I had figured that at some point developers would have gone for the cheaper land in the southern metroplex, but it seems to just keep heading further north every year.
At some point people will start looking south because of outrageous prices in the North because they will get more bang for their buck and with it developers will head south too. There’s only so much land up north before they hit Oklahoma and commute times from north to airport etc will be outrageous. M3 is a great start that new fancy things will come south and Viridian was a great start too and is pretty safe. New home communities look the same anyway and not all northern school zones are great (for example Little Elm ISD). Mansfield ISD is much better. You are right about demand and supply for north. Fingers crossed the South will boom too especially with more jobs settling in between the Texas Triangle (DFW, Austin/San Antonio, Houston) and the South of DFW would be so much closer to that.
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Old 02-17-2021, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Addison, TX
7,422 posts, read 3,006,740 times
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There are 3 main reasons why areas south of DFW aren't growing nearly as fast as areas north of DFW:

1. Schools. Mansfield ISD overall is good, but it is the exception to the rule. The other districts range from average to mediocre. If people are going to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a house, they want to maximize the return on their investment and that means living in a school district where they can command a highest price possible for their home when it's time to sell.

2. Lack of commercial amenities. Yes, the southern suburbs have places like The Parks at Arlington, that Outlet Mall in Grand Prairie and Hillside Village. But the stores at all of these places are pretty run-of-the-mill. If you want to shop at specialty stores or upscale shops like Nordstrom's or Neiman's, you're out of luck. Same goes for the restaurant choices too. The makeup of food establishments are generally fast food and generic chain restaurants like Red Robin and Olive Garden. A lot of people would rather live near Legacy/Stonebriar, The Galleria or Northpark where they don't have to plan a day trip for high-end / high-quality stores & restaurants.

3. Poor proximity to white collar jobs. Maybe not so much a big deal if you're a blue collar laborer or WFH, but for folks who work in office jobs, being as close to as many potential job opportunities as possible is critical. By living south of DFW, they essentially limit themselves to downtown Dallas (and to a lesser extent, Bell Helicopter & American Airlines) as their only option within a reasonable commuting distance for future job opportunities. This would be an issue if they have a desire to job hop or unexpectedly lose their job, because they'd be too far from the other major job hubs north of downtown Dallas.

That said, let's make no mistake about it. The areas south of DFW are still seeing tremendous growth. Because the price of land is cheaper, this area has become very attractive to homebuilders who want to bring desperately needed starter homes online for DFW buyers. A developers plans to break ground on a 10K home development in Waxahachie (Emory Lakes), and there are a pair of 4,000 to 4,500 home developments that will soon break ground in both Midlothian and Ferris. Plus, with the expansion of I-35E, this part of the Metroplex will continue to become even more attractive to developers for logistic parks. And eventually, at some point in the future when the population density is sufficient, more retailers will hopefully open in these communities south of DFW.
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Old Yesterday, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Dallas,TX
297 posts, read 353,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post

2. Lack of commercial amenities. Yes, the southern suburbs have places like The Parks at Arlington, that Outlet Mall in Grand Prairie and Hillside Village. But the stores at all of these places are pretty run-of-the-mill. If you want to shop at specialty stores or upscale shops like Nordstrom's or Neiman's, you're out of luck. Same goes for the restaurant choices too. The makeup of food establishments are generally fast food and generic chain restaurants like Red Robin and Olive Garden. A lot of people would rather live near Legacy/Stonebriar, The Galleria or Northpark where they don't have to plan a day trip for high-end / high-quality stores & restaurants.

3. Poor proximity to white collar jobs. Maybe not so much a big deal if you're a blue collar laborer or WFH, but for folks who work in office jobs, being as close to as many potential job opportunities as possible is critical. By living south of DFW, they essentially limit themselves to downtown Dallas (and to a lesser extent, Bell Helicopter & American Airlines) as their only option within a reasonable commuting distance for future job opportunities. This would be an issue if they have a desire to job hop or unexpectedly lose their job, because they'd be too far from the other major job hubs north of downtown Dallas.

This would probably be the case for the southwestern suburbs of Dallas but no really for Mansfield. Luxury retail, quality restaurants, and white-collar jobs are not that far in Fort Worth and to a lesser extent, Arlington. Plus, most of the people there will most likely end up commuting to other parts of Tarrant County rather than Dallas.
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