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Old 03-04-2011, 09:58 AM
 
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I've heard of this thing called a clothesline that can save a lot in the summer time months.
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Old 03-04-2011, 02:42 PM
 
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^what about during spring and fall?
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Old 03-04-2011, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Torrance, CA
95 posts, read 225,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccornewell View Post
^what about during spring and fall?
depends on where you are located. in SoCal you're not gonna put that thing off the lawn during winter i guess.
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Old 03-05-2011, 03:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by sean98125 View Post
I've heard of this thing called a clothesline that can save a lot in the summer time months.
And your homeowners association allows that? Of course if you are really frugal you don't live in that kind of neighborhood.
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Old 03-05-2011, 07:59 PM
 
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I live in an HOA community with a draconian set of bylaws, but I've never any problems with my clothesline. It helps that it's mostly obscured by a privacy fence. I also live in Denver, and I use my retractable clothesline year-round.
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Old 04-25-2011, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Potato masher. Save one of those cans with a ring-pull top, like refried beans or pineapple. When the cap pulls off, there is a little wide ridge left around the inside of the top of the can. Punch a few big holes in the bottom of the can, and use it as a potato masher, top side down. Any regular can will do, but it will take a little longer because of the rather sharp top edge.
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Old 04-27-2011, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
468 posts, read 1,541,421 times
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Personally I have made these changes at my humble homestead:

1. Installed a programmable thermostat.

2. Installed a clothesline in the backyard, and I use it in the Spring, Summer, and Fall (weather permitting).

3. Switched to CFL's throughout the house. I bought them (60, 75, and 100 watt
equivalent) when they were on sale at my local Ace Hardware for $1.00 each. That was a couple of years ago. I think Home Depot, and Lowe's, now sell multipacks for less than $10.

4. Evaluated how much empty space I have in my refridgerator/freezer. I bought appropriately sized plastic containers, with lids, at my local dollar store. I filled them with water, and placed them in my fridge and freezer compartments (make sure to get freezer safe plastic containers). The fridge/freezer will cool/freeze the water in the containers. As a result I am no longer cooling/freezing "empty" space. And the cooled/frozen water will, in turn, keep the fridge/freezer from operating nearly as often.

Now, my fridge functions as an ice chest. Coming on less often because of the cooled/frozen water. If I need extra space for whatever reason then I will remove as many containers as needed. I can use the water for my plants, or refill my dogs water dish, or simply set the container on the counter and put it back when needed.
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Old 04-27-2011, 10:22 AM
 
Location: NJ
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we are trying to utilize windows as much as possible to keep from using the A/C
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Right on. Fully solar-powered clothes dryer, holds a full load of wash, only $2.98.
It's pretty amazing how much clothing a collapsible drying rack will hold. First time I bought one, I figure I'd throw on the things that can't be dried. Ended up putting the whole load on it.
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Old 04-27-2011, 03:29 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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For those who use a clothesline, do your clothes smell weird when you bring them inside? I've tried using one, but I end up having to wash everything again when I bring it in because it smells bad.
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